British Geotechnical Association

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British Geotechnical Association
Abbreviation BGA
Formation 1949 (1949)
Type NGO
Legal status Charity
Purpose Professional association
Coordinates 51°30′04″N 0°07′44″W / 51.5011°N 0.1290°W / 51.5011; -0.1290Coordinates: 51°30′04″N 0°07′44″W / 51.5011°N 0.1290°W / 51.5011; -0.1290
Website www.bga.city.ac.uk/cms/
Formerly called British Geotechnical Society

The British Geotechnical Association is a learned 'Associated Society' of the Institution of Civil Engineers,[1] based in London, England, and a registered UK charity (No. 284131).[2] It provides a focal point for organisations and individuals interested in geotechnical engineering.

Activities include annual lectures (notably the Rankine Lecture named after William Rankine, an early contributor to the theory of soil mechanics), monthly meetings, an annual conference, and a magazine: Ground Engineering.

The BGA is the UK member of the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ISSMGE) and the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM).

History[edit]

Before 1948, the ICE had a committee on soil mechanics and foundations and a British national committee of the then International Society of Soil Mechanics & Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE). In October 1948, the ICE's council decided to form a British national society of the ISSMFE. It was established as an unincorporated association, the British Geotechnical Society, in early 1949, and held its first formal meeting, chaired by W.K. Wallace, in October 1949.[3] During 1949 ICE also took on responsibility for publishing the journal Geotechnique.[3] It became a registered charity in 1981, and became the BGA in June 2000.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ICE Associated Societies newsletter, Spring/Summer 2011 (Accessed: 19 July 2013)
  2. ^ British Geotechnical Association, Registered Charity no. 284131 at the Charity Commission
  3. ^ a b Craig, Bill (23 November 1998). "Bill Craig, current British Geotechnical Society chairman, looks at the development of the society as it celebrates its 50th anniversary.". New Civil Engineer. Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  4. ^ BGA Trustees' Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2012 (Retrieved: 19 July 2013)

External links[edit]