British Universities and Colleges Sport

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"BUCS" redirects here. For other uses, see Bucs (disambiguation).
British Universities & Colleges Sport
BUCS
British Universities and Colleges Sport logo.png
Sport University Sport in the United Kingdom
Founded 2008
Location 20–24 King's Bench Street
London
SE1 0QX
United Kingdom
President John Inverdale
Chairman Ed Smith
Chief Exec Karen Rothery
Replaced
  • British Universities Sports Association (BUSA)
  • University College Sport (UCS)
Official website
www.bucs.org.uk
United Kingdom

British Universities & Colleges Sport (BUCS) is the governing body for university sport in the United Kingdom. BUCS was formed in June 2008 following a merger of the British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) and University College Sport (UCS) organisations.[1] BUCS is responsible for organising 50 inter-university sports within the UK and representative teams for the World University Championships and the World University Games.

BUCS is a membership organisation for 162 universities and colleges in the UK. It coordinates competitions and leagues for the 2.3 million students attending university. In the 2012/13 season over 5000 teams will compete in 16 league sports. University sports clubs can affiliate to BUCS through their athletic union or students' union when no separate AU exists. BUCS has the biggest domestic sporting programme in Europe.

BUCS organises a national championships event called the BUCS Gatorade Nationals. This was new in 2013, after replacing the previously named BUCS Championships. The event is hosted by Sheffield, as it has been since March 2010. Another major event run by BUCS is the newly formed BUCS Big Wednesday, which sees the Championship finals of 14 sports all take place at Leeds Met Campus over one day.

BUSA, one of BUCS's predecessor organisations, was founded in 1994, one of its co-founders was Alun Evans.

BUCS sports[edit]

Sponsors[edit]

BUCS currently has various sponsors across the organisation; Kukri Sports is the Official Teamwear Supplier to BUCS. PricewaterhouseCoopers has sponsored BUCS since 1999. BUCS also has other sponsorship deals with Mars, Red Bull, Gatorade, Barefoot Wine, Star Trac, Life Fitness, Endsleigh and Molten Sport.

BUCS Overall Championship[edit]

BUCS awards points in all its competitions towards the 'BUCS Overall Championship' - a ranking of member universities' sporting achievements. Loughborough has won every championship since 2002-03, with Birmingham, Durham, Bath and Leeds Met Carnegie all achieving multiple top 3 finishes.

2013-14 (BUCS)[2]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Durham
  3. Birmingham
  4. Bath
  5. Edinburgh
  6. Exeter
  7. Nottingham
  8. Northumbria
  9. Leeds Met Carnegie
  10. Manchester
2012-13 (BUCS)[3]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Durham
  3. Birmingham
  4. Bath
  5. Exeter
  6. Edinburgh
  7. Nottingham
  8. Leeds Met Carnegie
  9. Manchester
  10. Newcastle
2011-12 (BUCS)[4]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Durham
  3. Birmingham
  4. Bath
  5. Leeds Met Carnegie
  6. Edinburgh
  7. Exeter
  8. Manchester
  9. Nottingham
  10. Newcastle
2010-11 (BUCS)[5]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Birmingham
  3. Leeds Met Carnegie
  4. Durham
  5. Bath
  6. Edinburgh
  7. Nottingham
  8. Exeter
  9. Manchester
  10. Oxford
2009-10 (BUCS)[6]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Leeds Met Carnegie
  3. Birmingham
  4. Bath
  5. Edinburgh
  6. Durham
  7. Nottingham
  8. Oxford
  9. Manchester
  10. Exeter
2008-9 (BUCS)[7]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Bath
  3. Leeds Met Carnegie
  4. Birmingham
  5. Edinburgh
  6. Durham
  7. Nottingham
  8. Oxford
  9. Cambridge
  10. Newcastle
2007-8 (BUSA)[8]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Bath
  3. Birmingham
  4. Durham
  5. Edinburgh
  6. Nottingham
  7. Leeds Met Carnegie
  8. Manchester
  9. Oxford
  10. Newcastle
2006-7 (BUSA)[9]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Bath
  3. Birmingham
  4. Edinburgh
  5. Nottingham
  6. Durham
  7. UWIC
  8. Oxford
  9. Newcastle
  10. Exeter
2005-6 (BUSA)[10]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Bath
  3. Birmingham
  4. Oxford
  5. Edinburgh
  6. UWIC
  7. Nottingham
  8. Durham
  9. Cambridge
  10. Manchester
2004-5 (BUSA)[11]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Bath
  3. Birmingham
  4. UWIC
  5. Durham
  6. Cambridge
  7. Nottingham
  8. Oxford
  9. Edinburgh
  10. Northumbria
2003-4 (BUSA)[12]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Bath
  3. Birmingham
  4. Nottingham
  5. Cambridge
  6. Exeter
  7. UWIC
  8. Edinburgh
  9. Oxford
  10. Durham
2002-3 (BUSA)[13]
  1. Loughborough
  2. Bath
  3. Birmingham
  4. UWIC
  5. Durham
  6. Nottingham
  7. Cambridge
  8. Edinburgh
  9. Oxford
  10. Exeter

History of student sport administration in the UK[edit]

Diagram of administration history of student sport in the UK

BUCS is the latest manifestation of an association for the promotion of inter-university sport. Competition between various universities had existed for many decades before the twentieth century, notably the rivalries between Oxford and Cambridge, and those between the country's medical schools. However no association existed to oversee or promote more widespread inter-university competition. In February 1918, the Presidents of University Unions conference in Manchester called for the need to establish such an association and the following year the Inter-Varsity Board of England and Wales helds its first inter-varsity meeting, with representatives of nine universities present. In 1922, association football, field hockey, rugby union and swimming were added to the events programme and the following year the Women’s Inter-Varsity Board came into being. In 1930 the Universities Athletic Union (UAU) was established and managed inter-university competition. To manage Britain’s student representation at an international level, the Inter-Varsity Athletic Board was formed in 1953.[14] This was replaced in 1962 by the British Universities Sports Federation (BUSF) with the Scottish Universities Sports Federation, the University of Wales Athletic Union and the Northern Ireland Universities Sports Committee being corporate members. However, colleges and polytechnics were excluded from membership and had their own equivalent bodies, the British Colleges Sports Association and the British Polytechnic Sports Association. Until 1979 men’s and women’s sport were still represented in England and Wales by separate bodies. The Women’s Inter-Varsity Board was then merged into the Universities Athletic Union. In 1992, the divide between universities and polytechnics was removed and a new single organisation was called for to represent them jointly. This led to the UAU and BUSF merging to create British Universities Sports Association (BUSA).[14]

Meanwhile, there had been a development of the representation for staff responsible for sport at university. Thus, in 1960 the Universities Physical Education Association (UPEA) had been formed which in 1972 became the British Universities Physical Education Association. This in turn merged with the Association of Polytechnic Physical Education Lecturers to become British Universities and Colleges Physical Education Association and in 2000 this was renamed as University and College Sport (UCS).[14]

In June 2008 British Universities & Colleges Sport (BUCS) was incorporated as a merger of UCS and BUSA to create one national association for university sport.[14]

  • British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) (1994–2008)
    • British Colleges Sports Association (BCSA) (?-1994)
    • British Polytechnic Sports Association (BPSA) (?-1994)
    • British Universities Sports Federation (BUSF) (1962–1994)
      • Inter-Varsity Athletic Board (1953–1962)
    • The Universities Athletic Union (UAU) (1930–1994)
      • Women's Inter Varsity Athletic Board (WIVAB) (1923–1979)
      • Inter Varsity Athletics Board of England and Wales (1919–1930)
  • University College Sport (UCS) (2000–2008)
    • British Universities and Colleges Physical Education Association (BUCPEA) (1993–2000)
      • British Universities Physical Education Association (BUPEA) (1972–1993)
        • Universities Physical Education Association (UPEA) (1960–1972)
      • Association of Polytechnic Physical Education Lecturers (APPEL) (?-1993)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]