British general election, 1727

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Great Britain general election, 1727
Kingdom of Great Britain
1722 ←
14 August to 17 October → 1734

All 558 seats of the House of Commons
280 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Retuched Painting of Robert Walpole.jpg Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke (1678-1751).jpg 1stEarlOfBath.jpg
Leader Robert Walpole Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke William Pulteney
Party Whig Tory Opposition Whig
Leader's seat King's Lynn - Hedon
Seats won 415 128 15
Seat change Increase 26 Decrease 41 Increase 15
Popular vote - - -
Percentage - - -

Prime Minister of Great Britain before election

Robert Walpole
Whig

Prime Minister of Great Britain

Robert Walpole
Whig

The British general election, 1727, returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

Summary of the Constituencies[edit]

See British general election, 1796 for details. The constituencies used were the same throughout the existence of the Parliament of Great Britain.

Dates of Election[edit]

The general election was held between 14 August 1727 and 17 October 1727.

At this period elections did not take place at the same time in every constituency. The returning officer in each county or parliamentary borough fixed the precise date (see hustings for details of the conduct of the elections).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • British Electoral Facts 1832-1999, compiled and edited by Colin Rallings and Michael Thrasher (Ashgate Publishing Ltd 2000). (For dates of elections before 1832, see the footnote to Table 5.02).