Broadcast band

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This article is about radio frequencies. For the band, see Broadcast (band).

A broadcast band is a segment of the radio spectrum used for broadcasting.

Common name Frequencies Modulation Frequency range Notes
Longwave 148.5 and 283.5 kHz Amplitude Modulation (AM) Low frequency (LF) Mostly used by Europe, North Africa and Asia
AM radio 535 to 1700 kHz Amplitude Modulation (AM) Medium Frequency (MF) Usually speech and news, where a lower bandwidth will suffice; long range at night due to the ionosphere increasing in altitude
Shortwave 5.9 to 26.1 MHz Mostly AM and single-sideband (SSB) modes. High Frequency (HF) Very long range through "skipping". Standard time frequencies can be heard here.
VHF low (TV) 54 to 88 MHz vestigial sideband modulation for analog video, and FM for analog audio; 8-VSB or OFDM for digital broadcast Very High Frequency (VHF) band I Channels 2 through 6 are from 54 to 88 MHz (except 72–76 MHz).
FM radio 87.5 to 108 MHz, 76 to 90 in Japan Frequency Modulation (FM) VHF band II Usually music, due to the clarity and high bandwidth of FM. Relatively short range
VHF high (TV) 174 to 216 MHz vestigial sideband modulation for analog video, and FM for analog audio; 8-VSB or OFDM for digital broadcast VHF band III Channels 7 through 13 are from 174 to 216 MHz.
UHF (TV) 470 to 806 MHz vestigial sideband modulation for analog video, and FM for analog audio; 8-VSB or OFDM for digital broadcast Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Channels 14 through 69 are from 470 to 806 MHz, except 608 to 614 (radio astronomy in place of channel 37).

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