Broadview, Saskatchewan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Broadview
Town
Broadview is located in Saskatchewan
Broadview
Broadview
Location of Broadview in Saskatchewan
Coordinates: 50°22′34″N 102°34′44″W / 50.376°N 102.579°W / 50.376; -102.579
Country Canada
Province Saskatchewan
Region Saskatchewan
Census division No. 5
Post office Founded 1882-11-01
Incorporated (Village) 1898
Government
 • Mayor Sidney Criddle
 • Member of legislative assembly Don Toth
 • Member of Parliament Ed Komarnicki
Area
 • Total 2.45 km2 (0.95 sq mi)
Population (2006)
 • Total 611
 • Density 248.9/km2 (645/sq mi)
Time zone CST
Postal code S0G 0K0
Area code(s) 306
Highways Trans Canada Highway
Highway 13
Highway 18
Highway 201
[1][2]

Broadview (Assiniboine: wádapá obásmiyaya [3]) is a community in Saskatchewan along the #1 highway, the Trans Canada Highway, 155 kilometres (96 mi) east of Regina. The local economy is based mainly on agriculture. It is also the administrative office of the Kahkewistahaw First Nation reserve.

History[edit]

CPR railway station facing north

The North-West Mounted Police (NWMP) set up a divisional post in Broadview in 1885.[4] Sergeant Bill, a goat from Broadview served as the mascot for the 5th Battalion, CEF, during World War I. The goat received a decoration, and after its passing resides now in the Broadview Museum.[5] The Broadview railway station was designated a historic railway station in 1992. [6]

Geography[edit]

Broadview is located in the Indian Head Plain of the Aspen Parkland ecoregion.[7] The physiographic region is the Qu'Appelle plains in the Saskatchewan Plains physiographic region.[8] Broadview is within the topographical area of Weed Hills. The bedrock geology belongs to that of the Mannville Group, a stratigraphical unit of Cretaceous age in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin formed during the lower Cretaceous period.[7] The area is characterised by lush rolling grasslands, interspersed with poplar bluffs (in prairie Canadian terminology poplar groves surrounding sloughs) and open sloughs.[8] The Cowessess, Kahkewistahaw, Ochapowace Indian reserves are within 20 kilometres (12 mi) of Broadview.[9] Highway 201 provides access to Bird's Point Resort (Saskatchewan) located at Round Lake (Saskatchewan) in the Qu'Appelle Valley.

Climate[edit]

Broadview has a humid continental climate, with extreme seasonal temperatures. It has hot summers and cold winters, with the average daily temperatures ranging from −16.4 °C (2.5 °F) in January to 18 °C (64.4 °F) in July. Annually, temperatures exceed 30 °C (86 °F) on an average in late July Typically, summer lasts from late June until late August, and the humidity is seldom uncomfortably high. Winter lasts from November to March, and varies greatly in length and severity. Spring and autumn are both short and highly variable.

On February 1, 1996, a record windchill of −60.7 °C (−77.3 °F) was recorded around 11:00 in the morning. Creating the windchill were northwesterly winds blowing at 44 kilometres per hour (27 mph) combined with a temperature of −39.3 °C (−38.7 °F).[7][10]

Climate data for Broadview
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 8.2
(46.8)
12.5
(54.5)
19.5
(67.1)
31.5
(88.7)
37.4
(99.3)
37
(99)
38.7
(101.7)
38
(100)
36.1
(97)
31.7
(89.1)
22.2
(72)
16.7
(62.1)
38.7
(101.7)
Average high °C (°F) −10.8
(12.6)
−7.8
(18)
−0.3
(31.5)
10
(50)
18.1
(64.6)
22.2
(72)
24.8
(76.6)
24
(75)
17.5
(63.5)
10.6
(51.1)
−0.8
(30.6)
−8.8
(16.2)
8.2
(46.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) −16.4
(2.5)
−13.2
(8.2)
−5.6
(21.9)
3.6
(38.5)
11.1
(52)
15.5
(59.9)
17.7
(63.9)
16.7
(62.1)
10.7
(51.3)
4.4
(39.9)
−5.7
(21.7)
−14
(7)
2.1
(35.8)
Average low °C (°F) −21.9
(−7.4)
−18.6
(−1.5)
−10.9
(12.4)
−2.7
(27.1)
4.1
(39.4)
8.7
(47.7)
10.6
(51.1)
9.4
(48.9)
3.9
(39)
−1.9
(28.6)
−10.6
(12.9)
−19.2
(−2.6)
−4.1
(24.6)
Record low °C (°F) −45
(−49)
−40.2
(−40.4)
−40.6
(−41.1)
−24.7
(−12.5)
−11.6
(11.1)
−6.2
(20.8)
0.6
(33.1)
−4.8
(23.4)
−9.4
(15.1)
−23
(−9)
−35.2
(−31.4)
−41.7
(−43.1)
−45
(−49)
Precipitation mm (inches) 15.2
(0.598)
11.3
(0.445)
21.2
(0.835)
23.8
(0.937)
49.9
(1.965)
68
(2.68)
58.8
(2.315)
59.3
(2.335)
50
(1.97)
21.1
(0.831)
14.1
(0.555)
19.9
(0.783)
412.6
(16.244)
Rainfall mm (inches) 0.3
(0.012)
0.5
(0.02)
4.2
(0.165)
14.1
(0.555)
44.1
(1.736)
67.9
(2.673)
58.8
(2.315)
59.3
(2.335)
47.5
(1.87)
13.8
(0.543)
2
(0.08)
0.7
(0.028)
313
(12.32)
Snowfall cm (inches) 19.8
(7.8)
14.6
(5.75)
20.1
(7.91)
11
(4.3)
6.3
(2.48)
0.1
(0.04)
0
(0)
0
(0)
2.9
(1.14)
7.9
(3.11)
15.5
(6.1)
24.8
(9.76)
122.9
(48.39)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 116.4 140.4 174.9 233.5 268 287.3 326.5 283.3 196 167.9 106.4 95.2 2,395.8
Source: Environment Canada[10]

Demographics[edit]

Government[edit]

The town of Broadview has a mayor as the highest ranking government official. The town also elects aldermen or councillors to form the municipal council. Currently the mayor is Sidney Criddle, and is serving with councillors Lori Stephan, Esther Bonk, Brent Bagshaw, Terry Fitzgerald, Tracy Strachan. The town administrator is Mervin Schmidt.[12]

Provincially Broadview is within the constituency of Moosomin served by their Member of legislative assembly, the honourable Don Toth.[13]

Federally the Souris--Moose Mountain riding is represented by their Member of Parliament, Ed Komarnicki.[14]

Economy[edit]

The Mainline Regional Economic Development Authority provides assistance and business advice for Broadview and the rural municipality of Elcapo NO. 154.[15] Highway 201 provides access to the Qu'Appelle Valley, 19 km (12 mi) north, which contains Crooked Lake Provincial Park at Crooked Lake and Bird's Point Resort at Round Lake.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Broadview is located on the #1 highway, the Trans Canada Highway, 155 kilometres (96 mi) east of the provincial capital city of Regina at the junction with Highway 201 north and Highway 605 south.

Broadview was the western terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1882, and later went on to become a major divisional point for the CPR.[16] Broadview was located on the CPR West line between Regina and Winnipeg, Manitoba. The line ran through Wolseley, Summerberry, Grenfell, Oakshela, Broadview, it continued east through Percival, Whitewood and Burrows. At Broadview in 1925, the time zone changed from Central Standard Time to Mountain Standard Time.[17] The Canadian Pacific Railway station building was declared a historic railway station in 1992 [18]

The original grade which the 1882 rail was built upon was abandoned in favour of a better grade, and an historical marker commemorates the old rail track.[16]

Education[edit]

Currently Broadview school serves an enrolled population of about 150 students between Kindergarten to Grade 12 is a part of Prairie Valley School Division No. 208.[19][20] Broadview school division office is located in Broadview.[19]

Broadview School #5 was established 1885, followed by Meadow Lea #55, Forest Farm #90, Spring Lake #153, Spring Lake #153, Clifton #278, Highland #437, River Ayr 534, Northwood #2988, Elcapo #3013, Kingsley #3916, Weed Creek #4352, Logwood #4924.[21] Historically Cowesses Day School was situated near Broadview.[22] The Highland One Room Schoohouse is preserved in the Broadview museum.[23]

Museums and other points of interest[edit]

The Broadview Recreation Site is located 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) from town. Broadview museum opened July 15, 1972.[24]

Celebration Park comes equipped with baseball diamonds, tennis courts, rodeo ground, horseshoe pits, and a children's playground.[24] Broadview also features a natural ice-skating and hockey rink, Broadview Curling Club and the 9 hole Broadview Golf Club.[24]

Prominent people[edit]

Dr. Frederick J. Gathercole B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D. started out teaching in several one-room school houses in Saskatchewan before becoming the Director of Education. Gathercole received the Saskatchewan Order of Merit, and the Saskatoon Board of Education offices were housed in the Dr. F.J. Gathercole Education Centre located in the central business diestrict on June 16, 1972 until the offices moved to the former Eaton's Building.[16] In 1988 the University of Saskatchewan conferred upon him an honorary doctorate of laws for his contributions in community service and education.[25]

John Hall Archer was born 1914 near Broadview, becoming the first president of the University of Regina and provincial archivist. The Order of Canada and the Saskatchewan Order of Merit have been conferred upon him, and the U of R library is named in his honour.[26]

Location[edit]

[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Archives, Archivia Net. "Post Offices and Postmasters". Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  2. ^ "Broadview". MedHunters. Retrieved 2009-05-17. 
  3. ^ "AISRI Dictionary Database Search--prototype version. Assiniboine.". Retrieved 2012-07-07. 
  4. ^ McLennan, David (2006). "Broadview". Encyclopaedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Centre University of Regina. Retrieved 2009-05-18. 
  5. ^ McLennan, David (2006). "Sergeant Bill". Encyclopaedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Centre University of Regina. Retrieved 2009-05-18. 
  6. ^ "Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada - The Directory of Designated Heritage Railway Stations in Saskatchewan". Parks Canada. Retrieved 2011-02-07. 
  7. ^ a b c Thorpe, J. (1999). "Natural Vegetation". In Kai-iu Fung, Bill Barry, Wilson, Michael. Atlas of Saskatchewan Celebrating the Millennium (Millennium ed.) (Saskatchewan: University of Saskatchewan). pp. 46, 63, 76, 91, 160. ISBN 0-88880-387-7. 
  8. ^ a b Coupland, R.T. (1969). "Natural Vegetation of Saskatchewan". In J.H. Richards, K.I. Fung. Atlas of Saskatchewan. J.S. Rowe. Saskatoon, SK, CA: University of Saskatchewan. pp. 72–78. 
  9. ^ "Querying Geographical Names of Canada". Natural Resources Canada. Government of Canada. 2007-12-28. Retrieved 209-05-18. 
  10. ^ a b Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000, accessed 23 July 2010
  11. ^ "2006 Community Profiles". Canada 2006 Census. Statistics Canada. March 30, 2011. Retrieved 2009-02-24. 
  12. ^ Government of Saskatchewan, MRD Home. "Municipal Directory System". Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  13. ^ Canadian Textiles Institute. (2005). "CTI Determine your provincial constituency". Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  14. ^ Commissioner of Canada Elections, Chief Electoral Officer of Canada (2005). "Elections Canada On-line". Retrieved 2009-05-08. 
  15. ^ "Town of Broadview Economic Development". Retrieved 2009-05-17. 
  16. ^ a b c E.T. Russell, ed. (1973). What's In a Name?. Saskatoon: Western Producer Prairie Books. p. 39. ISBN 0-919306-39-X. 
  17. ^ Adamson, Julia (1925). "Canadian Maps: January 1925 Waghorn's Guide. Post Offices in Man. Sask. Alta. and West Ontario." (Published online January 5, 2005). Online Historical Map Digitization Project. Waghorn. Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  18. ^ National Historic Railway Stations
  19. ^ a b http://www.saskschools.ca/~broadiv/index.html, retrieved 2009-05-15  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  20. ^ Hovind, Winona. "Welcome to Broadview School". Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  21. ^ Adamson, Julia (15 Mar 2006). "Saskatchewan One Room School Project". Saskatchewan Gen Web. Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  22. ^ "Cowessess Day School near Broadview, Sask". Saskatchewan One Room School Project. 10 Aug 2008. Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  23. ^ "Town of Broadview - Museum". Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  24. ^ a b c "Broadview Geography What is unique about Broadview aside from its ...". SaskBiz. Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  25. ^ "Honorary degree recipients :: University of Saskatchewan Archives". University of Saskatchewan. 20 Apr 2007. Retrieved 2009-05-17. 
  26. ^ Chaput, John (2006). "Archer, John (1914–2004)". Encyclopaedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Centre University of Regina. Retrieved 2009-05-18. 
  27. ^ Adamson, Julia (1925). "Saskatchewan, Canada, Rand McNally 1924 Indexed Pocket Map Tourists' and Shippers' Guide" (Published online 11-Nov-2003). Online Historical Map Digitization Project. Waghorn. Retrieved 2009-05-15. 

External links[edit]

  • [1] Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan

Coordinates: 50°22′34″N 102°34′44″W / 50.376°N 102.579°W / 50.376; -102.579