Bleecker Street / Broadway – Lafayette Street (New York City Subway)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bleecker Street / Broadway – Lafayette Street
NYCS 4 NYCS 6 NYCS 6d NYCS B NYCS D NYCS F NYCS M
New York City Subway rapid transit station complex
Bway Lafayette Bleecker.JPG
One of the two street stairs along the south side of East Houston Street between Broadway and Crosby Street
Station statistics
Address Bleecker Street & Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10012
Borough Manhattan
Locale NoHo, SoHo
Coordinates 40°43′33″N 73°59′41″W / 40.72583°N 73.99472°W / 40.72583; -73.99472Coordinates: 40°43′33″N 73°59′41″W / 40.72583°N 73.99472°W / 40.72583; -73.99472
Division A (IRT), B (IND)
Line       IND Sixth Avenue Line
      IRT Lexington Avenue Line
Services       4 late nights (late nights)
      6 all times (all times) <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction)
      B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
      D all times (all times)
      F all times (all times)
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
Connection NYCT Bus: M5 (SB), M21, X1, X7, X9, X10, X12, X17
Other information
Opened May 19, 1957; 57 years ago (1957-05-19)[note 1]
September 25, 2012; 2 years ago (2012-09-25)[note 2]
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Traffic
Passengers (2013) 12,560,629 (station complex)[1] Increase 6.6%
Rank 24 out of 421

Bleecker Street / Broadway – Lafayette Street is a New York City Subway station complex in the NoHo district of Manhattan on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line and the IND Sixth Avenue Line. It is served by the:

  • 6, D, and F trains at all times
  • B and M trains on weekdays
  • <6> train during rush hours in the peak direction
  • 4 train during late nights

The complex comprises two stations, Bleecker Street (IRT) and Broadway – Lafayette Street (IND). A free transfer passageway from the downtown IRT platform to the IND platform opened on May 19, 1957 after the IRT station's platforms were lengthened.[2] This "one-way" transfer existed for about 50 years, as the connection from the IND platforms to the downtown IRT platform was purely coincidental, and was not originally intended when first built.[2] On March 26, 2012, the uptown platform was shifted 300 feet south to the newly constructed extension and the 1950s northern extension closed at the same time. The connection from the uptown IRT platform to the IND station opened on September 25, 2012.[3][4] The transfer boasted new elevators and escalators to the IND station below. Prior to 2012, transfer to the northbound platform from the IND station required a brief walk on surface streets and payment of an additional fare (except for unlimited-ride MetroCard holders). The entire project cost $135 million.[5]

Station layout[edit]

G Street Level Exit/Entrance
Handicapped/disabled access (Elevator at NW corner of Lafayette and Houston Streets)
B1 East Mezzanine Fare control, exits to east side of Lafayette Street
Side platform, doors will open on the right Handicapped/disabled access
Northbound local NYCS 6 NYCS 6d toward Pelham Bay Park (NYCS 6 toward Parkchester PM rush hours and middays) (Astor Place)
NYCS 4 toward Woodlawn late nights (Astor Place)
Northbound express NYCS 4 NYCS 5 do not stop here
Southbound express NYCS 4 NYCS 5 do not stop here →
Southbound local NYCS 6 NYCS 6d toward Brooklyn Bridge – City Hall (NYCS 4 toward New Lots Avenue late nights) (Spring Street)
Side platform, doors will open on the right Handicapped/disabled access
West Mezzanine Fare control, station agent, exits to west side of Lafayette Street and to Houston Street
B2 Mezzanine Transfer between platforms
B3 Northbound local NYCS F toward Jamaica – 179th Street (West Fourth Street – Washington Square)
NYCS M toward Forest Hills – 71st Avenue (West Fourth Street – Washington Square)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Northbound express NYCS B toward Bedford Park Boulevard rush hours, 145th Street middays and evenings (West Fourth Street – Washington Square)
NYCS D toward Norwood – 205th Street (West Fourth Street – Washington Square)
Southbound express NYCS B toward Brighton Beach weekdays (Grand Street)
NYCS D toward Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue via West End (Grand Street)
Island platform, doors will open on the left, right Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound local NYCS F toward Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue via Culver (Second Avenue)
NYCS M toward Middle Village – Metropolitan Avenue (Essex Street)

This station had a unique feature in the system, in that a transfer to the Lexington Avenue line from the IND platform was only possible in the southbound direction until late September 2012.[6] Prior to September 2012, the Broadway – Lafayette Street station only connected only to the southbound platform of Bleecker Street at the extreme south end. Because a major rehabilitation project did not start until 2009, a large offset of that station's platforms could not permit the construction of a full transfer to both platforms of the Bleecker Street station, when the free transfer was created in 1957. As a result, a free transfer was not available to the northbound platform and access to it required a one-block walk north to Bleecker Street and payment of an additional fare except to Unlimited-Ride MetroCard holders. Interestingly, such a transfer between the IND and the uptown IRT platforms had been planned since 1989.[7]

The new transfer

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority's 2005–2009 capital program allocated $50 million to renovate the complex, which included installation of ADA-accessible elevators and a free transfer to the uptown IRT platform.[6] The MTA had originally stated, on March 26, 2012, that the transfer project to the uptown Bleecker Street platform would be completed at the end of June. However, the uptown transfer did not fully open until September 25, 2012. The overall cost of the rehabilitation project has climbed to US$135 million.[8]

On the same day, an escalator connected the uptown platform of the Broadway-Lafayette Street station with a new transfer mezzanine that connected riders to the uptown platform of the Bleecker Street station. In addition, elevators were installed to connect the various platforms of the IND station, and those of Bleecker Street.


IRT Lexington Avenue Line platforms[edit]

Bleecker Street
NYCS 4 NYCS 6 NYCS 6d
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Bleecker Street platform.JPG
Platform for the uptown local 6 train
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line       IRT Lexington Avenue Line
Services       4 late nights (late nights)
      6 all times (all times) <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction)
Connection
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened October 27, 1904; 109 years ago (1904-10-27)[9]
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Station succession
Next north Astor Place: 4 late nights 6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Next south Spring Street: 4 late nights 6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction


Next Handicapped/disabled access north Grand Central – 42nd Street: 4 late nights 6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Next Handicapped/disabled access south Canal Street: 4 late nights 6 all times <6>weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction

Bleecker Street Subway Station (IRT)
MPS New York City Subway System MPS
NRHP Reference # 04001012[10]
Added to NRHP September 17, 2004

Bleecker Street on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line is a standard local station with four tracks and two side platforms. There are four tracks here, with the two center express tracks used by 4 and 5 trains during the day. Fare control is currently at platform level, with a crossunder via the IND mezzanine. It has two side platforms which were originally 5-cars long. In the 1950s, the southbound platform was extended to the south and the northbound platform was extended to the north for ten car trains.

The station used to have skylights to let in natural light (1905)

The station features two styles of "Bleecker Street" station identifiers made by the Grueby Faience Company in 1904. The large "Bleecker Street" plaques were assembled from 27 pieces of faience ceramic. They depict poppies. The smaller blue "B" cartouches show tulips, probably a reminder of the Dutch origins of the city. Later Vickers' mosaic tablets were installed when the station was extended, and five different colors were used for the mosaics. These mosaics were removed in the 2012 renovation of the station, and replicas of the "B" cartouches were installed throughout the station.

A new MTA's Arts for Transit project was created in 2012, called Hive, by Leo Villareal. It is located at the newest section of the uptown platform in the mezzanine providing the transfer to the IND station.[11] This new art complements the first work, called Signal by Mel Chin, which was added in 1997 to the station complex.

Gallery[edit]


IND Sixth Avenue Line platforms[edit]

Broadway – Lafayette Street
NYCS B NYCS D NYCS F NYCS M
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Broadway - Lafayette Street.JPG
Station statistics
Division B (IND)
Line       IND Sixth Avenue Line
Services       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
      D all times (all times)
      F all times (all times)
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
Connection
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened January 1, 1936; 78 years ago (1936-01-01)
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Station succession
Next north West Fourth Street – Washington Square: B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. D all times F all times M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
Next south Second Avenue (local): F all times
Grand Street (express): B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. D all times
Essex Street (local via Chyrstie St.): M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.


Next Handicapped/disabled access north West Fourth Street – Washington Square: B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. D all times F all times M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
Next Handicapped/disabled access south Jay Street – MetroTech (local): F all times
DeKalb Avenue (express via Chrystie St.): B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. D late nights
Atlantic Avenue – Barclays Center (express via Chrystie St.): D all except late nights
Marcy Avenue (local via Chrystie St.): M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.

Broadway – Lafayette Street on the IND Sixth Avenue Line is an express station, located on East Houston Street between Broadway and Lafayette Street in Manhattan. It is served by the D and F trains at all times, and the B and M trains on weekdays.

This section of the station complex, opened on January 1, 1936, has four tracks and two island platforms.[12] B and D trains stop at the inner express tracks while F and M trains stop at the outer local tracks.[12] Both outer track walls have a blue trim line on a black border and small "BROADWAY" signs beneath in white lettering on a black border. Large blue columns run along either side of both platforms at regular intervals with alternating ones having the standard black station name plate and white lettering.

The center of both platforms have three staircases that go up to a mezzanine, where wide staircases on either side go up to the station's three fare control areas. The full-time side is at the west end (railroad north). It has a turnstile bank, token booth, and two staircases going up to either eastern corners of Broadway and East Houston Street. The southeastern one is built inside an alcove of an Adidas Sport Performance Center.[13] The station's other fare control areas lead to exits on either side of East Houston Street. In one fare control area, a set of full height turnstiles lead to two separate entrances leading to East Houston Street between Lafayette and Crosby Streets, on the south side. In the other fare control area, another set of full height turnstiles leads to another entrance on Lafayette Street and Houston Street, on the north side. A passageway connects the Lafayette Street fare control areas with the fare control areas at the Broadway end of the station without going through the lower level mezzanine.

The 1998 artwork here is called Signal by Mel Chin. It features stainless steel and glass sculptures with lights on the mezzanine walls and ceramic tiles on the platform walls.

West (railroad north) of this station, there are crossovers between the two northbound tracks and a single one between the express tracks. The line turns north along Sixth Avenue and goes through a complex set of switches and crossovers with the IND Eighth Avenue Line before arriving at West Fourth Street – Washington Square.

East (railroad south) of this station, there used to be a crossover between the two southbound tracks before they were reconfigured in 1967 by the Chrystie Street Connection. The express tracks turn south down Chrystie Street and the B and D trains stop at Grand Street before crossing the Manhattan Bridge into Brooklyn. The local tracks continue east and F trains stop at Second Avenue. A connection from the local tracks leads to Essex Street on the BMT Nassau Street Line. M trains use this connection before crossing the Williamsburg Bridge into Brooklyn.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ (IND–southbound IRT)
  2. ^ (IND–northbound IRT)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership". New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved 2014-03-25. 
  2. ^ a b Chan, Sewell (2005-05-07). "With Connection on No. 6 Line, a Manhattan Transfer Is Coming". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-04-27. 
  3. ^ Redwine, Tina (September 25, 2012). "Transfers At Bleecker Street Are No Longer A Bleak Situation". NY1. Retrieved 2012-09-26. 
  4. ^ Matt Flegenheimer (September 24, 2012). "A Vexing Flaw in the Subway Is Finally Fixed". New York Times. pp. A18–A19. Retrieved September 28, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Bleecker Street Platform Shifts". MTA.info. March 26, 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  6. ^ a b With connection to No 6 line, a Manhattan transfer is coming New York Times Retrieved 2006-08-02
  7. ^ The New York Transit Authority in the 1980s
  8. ^ "Bleecker Street Platform Shifts". MTA.info. March 26, 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-27. 
  9. ^ New York Times, Our Subway Open: 150,000 Try It, October 28, 1904
  10. ^ "NPS Focus". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved December 24, 2011. 
  11. ^ Redwine, Tina (July 21, 2012). "MTA Unveils Digital Art At Bleecker Street Station". NY1. Retrieved 2012-07-22. 
  12. ^ a b Broadway-Lafayette Street NYCSubway Retrieved 2008-08-28
  13. ^ Downtown Bleecker Street / Broadway – Lafayette Street On NY Turf Retrieved 2008-08-28[dead link]

External links[edit]

External video
Bleecker St Station Expansion, Metropolitan Transportation Authority; February 5, 2010; 1:26 YouTube video clip (construction and rendering phase of the new transfer project between this station and the uptown Bleecker Street platform)
Broadway/Lafayette-Bleecker St Transfer, Metropolitan Transportation Authority; September 28, 2012; 4:04 YouTube video clip (completed project)

Media related to Bleecker Street / Broadway – Lafayette Street (New York City Subway) at Wikimedia Commons