Brooklyn Flea

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The Brooklyn Flea in Fort Greene.

Brooklyn Flea is a company based in Brooklyn, New York. Founded in 2008 by Jonathan Butler, creator of Brownstoner.com, and Eric Demby, the former communications director for Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, Brooklyn Flea runs several of the largest flea markets on the East Coast of the United States.[1] Featuring hundreds of vendors of antique and repurposed furniture, vintage clothing, collectibles and antiques, the flea also offers new jewelry, art, crafts, and apparel by local artisans and designers, as well as local food. From early April until late November, the flea markets are located at Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School in Fort Greene on Saturdays and at the Williamsburg waterfront on Sundays. During the winter months, the Flea moves indoors to Skylight One Hanson inside the Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower in Fort Greene for both Saturday and Sunday. Average daily attendance for each market is four to five thousand people.[2] Brooklyn Flea also operates and curates the food and beverage concessions at Central Park SummerStage.[3]

Brooklyn Flea has been mentioned by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal,[4] Martha Stewart,[5] and Travel + Leisure.[6]

In 2009, the Flea received a Certificate of Merit from the Municipal Art Society for making an “exceptional contribution to the life of New York City,” and for “providing an alternative to big-box retail that embodies a private sector spirit while yielding generous public benefits." [7]

In 2010, the Citizens Union honored the Flea with its Community Leadership Award for “creativity in building forums for exchange—both physical and virtual—that are strengthening New Yorkers’ spirit of community."[8]

In 2011, Brooklyn Flea opened "Smorgasburg," an all-food market on Saturdays at their Williamsburg waterfront location focusing on local and artisanal fare.[9] Smorgasburg features around seventy vendors of locally produced food and cooking accessories. [10] It is now also held in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Dumbo on Sundays.

In March 2014, an estimated 20 longtime vendors, many of whom were regulars since the beginning in 2008, were purged from the Fort Greene market. Citing a "move back toward a more traditional flea market, with vintage/antiques, furniture and collectibles at its core," the vendors, who had been contractually restricted by Brooklyn Flea from participating in other markets, were notified less than three weeks before start of the 2014 season.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trebay, Guy. "Scavengers on the Urban Savannah". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  2. ^ Linder, Joselin. "A Flea Grows in Brooklyn". AOL Real Estate. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  3. ^ Wells, Pete (24 March 2010). "Brooklyn Flea Curates Central Park Food Vendors". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  4. ^ WSJ Staff (20 December 2010). "Walkabout: Holiday Shopping With a Brooklyn Twist". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  5. ^ "Brooklyn Flea". www.marthastewart.com. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  6. ^ Clark, Colleen. "Visiting Brooklyn Flea’s Top Stands". Travel + Leisure. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  7. ^ "MAS Announces Winners of 2009 Awards at Annual Meeting". Municipal Art Society of New York. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  8. ^ "Spring for Reform 2010". Citizens Union of the city of New York. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  9. ^ Collins, Glen (17 May 2011). "A Food Flea Market Sets Up in Brooklyn". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  10. ^ Strand, Oliver (5 July 2011). "Brooklyn Market: Woodstock of Eating". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 

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