Bruce Jackson (scholar)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Bruce Jackson
Brucejackson.jpg
Born (1936-05-21) May 21, 1936 (age 78)
Brooklyn, New York
Occupation Scholar, photographer, director
Employer University at Buffalo
Website
brucejackson.us

Bruce H. Jackson (born May 21, 1936) is an American folklorist, documentary filmmaker, writer and photographer. He is SUNY Distinguished Professor and the James Agee Professor of American Culture at the University at Buffalo. Jackson has edited or authored 33 books and his articles have appeared in numerous magazines. He has also directed and produced five documentary films.

Biography[edit]

Bruce Jackson was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1936. He served in the United States Marine Corps from 1953–1956, then attended Newark College of Engineering (now New Jersey Institute of Technology) for three years. He received a BA from Rutgers University in 1960 and an MA from Indiana University's School of Letters in 1962. From 1963 through 1967 he was a Junior Fellow in Harvard University's Society of Fellows.

He has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (1971), was nominated for a Grammy (1974), named an Associate Member of the Folklore Fellows by the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters (1995), and Chevalier in l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government (2002). In 2012, the president of France appointed him chevalier in the National Order of Merit. He was president of the American Folklore Society (1984), chairman of the board of trustees of the American Folklore Center in the Library of Congress (1988–89, trustee 1984-89), and director, then trustee of the Newport Folk Foundation (1965—).

In 1968, he signed the "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest" pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.[1]

With Diane Christian, he has directed and produced five documentary films: Death Row (1979), Creeley (1988), Out of Order (1983), Robert Creeley: Willy's Reading (1982), and William August May (1982).

His photographs have been widely published and exhibited. The most recent exhibitions are Being There (Burchfield Penney Art Center, 2012), Portraits from a Prison (Arkansas Studies Institute, 2009), Cummins Wide (Albright-Knox Art Gallery 2009 and Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University, 2008), American Gulag (Lega di Cultura di Piadena and Circolo Gianni Bosio, Rome, 2007), Bridging Buffalo (Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society, 2006–2007), and Mirrors (Nina Freudenheim Gallery, 2004).

His work has been funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, Fund for Investigative Journalism, Playboy Foundation, Levi Strauss Foundation, Polaroid Foundation, New York Council for the Humanities and the American Philosophical Society..

He has spent his entire academic career at the University at Buffalo. He joined it as an assistant professor of English and Comparative Literature in 1967, was promoted to associate professor a year later and to professor in 1971. He became SUNY Distinguished Professor in 1990 and Samuel P. Capen Professor of American Culture in 1997. In 2009 he was appointed James Agee Professor of American Culture. He has been also been adjunct professor in the UB School of Law and Jurisprudence, and the departments of Media Studies and Sociology.

Since 2000, he and Diane Christian have conducted the Buffalo Film Seminars at the Market Arcade Theater in downtown Buffalo—an undergraduate film class that is open to the general public for the price of a movie ticket (about 200 auditors take part each week). On 14 or 15 Tuesday evenings each term, they introduce a classic film, screen it, then conduct an open discussion with the students and any of the auditors who want to take part. They also prepare 8-12 page handouts of notes on each film (nearly all of which are online at the Seminar's web site, as are lists of all films screened thus far, sorted by series, director, title and year of production). The Seminars have now presented over 300 different films.

From 1986-1990 Jackson was editor of the Journal of American Folklore. From 2002-2010, he was editor and publisher of the political web journal Buffalo Report. In the past few years, his articles have appeared frequently in Artvoice and CounterPunch.[2] He has also published articles and photographs in Harper's, The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, Film Comment, Der Spiegel, Le Monde, The Texas Observer, Rolling Stone, Ácoma, The Antioch Review, Sing Out!, The Minnesota Review, The Nation, The New Republic, Criminal Law Bulletin, Latino-America and Senses of Cinema.

Filmography[edit]

  • Death Row (1979)
  • Creeley (1988)
  • Out of Order (1983)
  • Robert Creeley: Willy's Reading (1982)
  • William August May (1982)

Published works[edit]

  • Folklore and Society (ed., Folklore Associates, 1966)
  • The Negro and his Folklore in 19th Century Periodicals (ed., American Folklore Society and University of Texas Press, 1967)
  • A Thief's Primer (Macmillan, 1969)
  • Prison, The Rip Off Review of Western Culture, Edition #1 June/July 1972
  • In the Life: Versions of the Criminal Experience (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1972)
  • Wake Up Dead Man: Afro-American Worksongs from Texas Prisons (Harvard University Press, 1972)
  • "Get Your Ass in the Water and Swim Like Me": Narrative Poetry from Black Oral Tradition (Harvard University Press, 1974)
  • Killing Time: Life in the Arkansas Penitentiary (photographs. Cornell University Press, 1977)
  • The Programmer (novel, Doubleday, 1979)
  • Death Row (with Diane Christian, Beacon Press, 1980)
  • Get the Money and Shoot: The DRI Guide to Funding Documentary Films (Documentary Research, 1981)
  • Your Father's Not Coming Home Any More (ed., Richard Marek/ Putnam's, 1981)
  • Doing Drugs (with Michael Jackson, St. Martin's, 1983)
  • Teaching Folklore (ed., American Folklore Society and Documentary Research, 1984)
  • Law and Disorder: Criminal Justice in America (University of Illinois Press, 1985)
  • Rainbow Freeware (New South Moulton Press, 1986)
  • Feminism and Folklore (ed., Special expanded issue of JAF, American Folklore Society, 1987)
  • Fieldwork (University of Illinois Press, 1987)
  • A User's Guide: Freeware, Shareware, and Public Domain Software (New South Moulton Press, 1988)
  • The Centennial Index: 100 Years of Journal of American Folklore (co-editor, with Michael Taft and Harvey Axlerod, American Folklore Society, 1988)
  • Disorderly Conduct (political and social essays, 1992, University of Illinois Press)
  • The World Observed: Reflections on the Fieldwork Process (co-editor, with Edward D. Ives, University of Illinois Press, 1996)
  • Emile de Antonio in Buffalo (editor, Center Working Papers, 2003)
  • The Peace Bridge Chronicles (Center Working Papers, 2003)
  • Late Friends (Center Working Papers, 2005)
  • The Story is True: The Art and Meaning of Telling Stories (Temple University Press, 2007)
  • Cummins Wide: Photographs from the Arkansas Prison (Center for Documentary Studies/Center Working Papers, 2008)
  • Pictures from a Drawer: Prison and the Art of Portraiture (Temple University Press, 2009)
  • In This Timeless Time: Living and Dying on Death Row in America (University of North Carolina Press, 2012, with Diane Christian)
  • "Inside the Wire: Photographs from Texas and Arkansas Prisons" (University of Texas Press, 2013)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest" January 30, 1968 New York Post
  2. ^ Jackson, Bruce (May 11, 2004). "The Deranged Mind of James Inhofe". CounterPunch. 

External links[edit]