Bruno Bianchi (cartoonist)

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Bruno Bianchi (c. 1955 – December 2, 2011) was a French cartoonist and animator. Bianchi worked extensively as an artist, film and television director and screenwriter for animated productions, including the series Inspector Gadget, Rainbow Brite, Heathcliff and its spinoff film, Heathcliff: The Movie in 1986.[1][2]

In 1980, Bianchi directed two series for DiC Audiovisuel, the studio he had been working for since 1977. One of them was Cro et Bronto (Cro and Bronto), a series of 45 episodes á 1 minute and 20 seconds each, about a stone age man trying to catch and eat a brontosaurus. The other series, Archibald le Magichien (Archibald the Magic Dog), was an educational show, running for 46 episodes, about a magic anthropomorphic dog (in reality an old wizard who had lost the magic formula allowing him to become himself again). Archibald befriends a young boy named Pierre and go on many highbrow adventures with him, teaching him important lifestyle lessons along the way. This series was presumably the first major collaboration between Bianchi and Jean Chalopin, who, as the founder and CEO of DiC, developed the show. Both Cro et Bronto and Archibald le Magichien are very hard to find today.

In 1981-82, Bianchi co-created the animated television series Inspector Gadget together with Andy Heyward and DiC's founder Jean Chalopin.[3] Bianchi also served as main character designer and supervising director on the show, which ran for two seasons and became one of the most iconic series created by DiC.

Bianchi worked as a producer, artist, animator, television and film director, and writer for numerous other DiC Entertainment, Saban Entertainment and S.I.P. Animation productions from the 1980s until the early 2000s. His credits include Heathcliff, Jayce and the Wheeled Warriors, M.A.S.K., Rainbow Brite, Iznogoud, W.I.T.C.H., Diplodos, Beverly Hills Teens, Princess Sissi and Gadget and the Gadgetinis (a spinoff of Inspector Gadget).[2]

In 2008, Bianchi founded his own studio, named Ginkgo Animation, following the closure of S.I.P. International.[2]

Biachi died on December 2, 2011, at the age of 56.[2] He was buried in Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris on December 6, 2011.[2][3]

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