Bruno Labbadia

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Bruno Labbadia
Bruno labbadia.jpg
Personal information
Full name Bruno Labbadia
Date of birth (1966-02-08) 8 February 1966 (age 48)
Place of birth Darmstadt, West Germany
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Striker
Youth career
1972–1976 FSV Schneppenhausen
1977–1983 SV Weiterstadt
1983–1984 SV Darmstadt 98
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1984–1987 SV Darmstadt 98 105 (44)
1987–1988 Hamburger SV 41 (11)
1988–1991 1. FC Kaiserslautern 67 (20)
1991–1994 Bayern Munich 82 (28)
1994–1995 1. FC Köln 41 (15)
1995–1998 Werder Bremen 63 (18)
1998–2001 Arminia Bielefeld 98 (50)
2001–2003 Karlsruher SC 60 (18)
Total 557 (204)
National team
1987 West Germany U-21 6 (3)
1992–1995 Germany 2 (0)
Teams managed
2003–2006 SV Darmstadt 98
2007–2008 SpVgg Greuther Fürth
2008–2009 Bayer Leverkusen
2009–2010 Hamburger SV
2010–2013 VfB Stuttgart
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Bruno Labbadia (born 8 February 1966 in Darmstadt) is a former German footballer of Italian heritage. He has been the manager of several German clubs since 2003. His last post was the head coach of Bundesliga club VfB Stuttgart.

Playing career[edit]

Bruno Labbadia

In an illustrious career, Labbadia recorded 103 goals in 328 league games having played for some of Germany's top Bundesliga clubs. He had two caps for the Germany national football team.[1]

Managerial career[edit]

SV Darmstadt 98[edit]

Labbadia was hired as the manager of SV Darmstadt 98 on 8 May 2003 with a start date.[2] Labbadia left on 30 June 2006.[3]

Greuther Fürth[edit]

Labbadia was hired as Greuther Fürth's manager on 19 March 2007.[4] Labbadia officially took over on 1 July 2007 when pre-season officially started.[5] He left the club on 26 May 2008 when he officially joined Bayer Leverkusen.[6]

Bayer Leverkusen[edit]

Labbadia was hired by Bayer Leverkusen on 26 May 2008.[6]

Hamburger SV[edit]

Labaddia took over as Hamburger SV manager on 1 July 2009.[7] Labbadia was dismissed on 26 April 2010.[8][9][10]

VfB Stuttgart[edit]

On 12 December 2010 Labbadia became the new head coach of VfB Stuttgart.[11] In his first season with the club, he managed to save the club that was staring relegation in the face after the disastrous reigns of his two predecessors, Christian Gross and Jens Keller, ended in the last quarter of 2010. VfB Stuttgart finished in 12th place in the 2010–11 Bundesliga, and would then qualify for the 2012–13 UEFA Europa League by virtue of its sixth position in the 2011–12 Bundesliga.[12]

On 30 January 2013, Labbadia signed a contract extension with Stuttgart, keeping him at the club until the summer of 2015.[13] VfB Stuttgart lost the 2012–13 DFB-Pokal final to FC Bayern Munich, but qualified for the 2013–14 UEFA Europa League by virtue of the fact that Bayern Munich had also won the 2012–13 Bundesliga title.

In the morning of 26 August 2013, Labbadia was relieved of his duties with immediate effect. His club had lost the opening three Bundesliga matches of the 2013–14 season and was in the second last position in the league table. During the press conference held in the afternoon on the same day, club president Bernd Wahler said, "Bruno Labbadia has done good work at VfB over the past three years but we want to provide fresh impetus with this change."[14][15]

Personal life[edit]

Labbadia is of Italian ancestry.[16] His family roots go to Lenola, a town in the province of Latina, in Lazio region.[17]

Career statistics[edit]

Club career statistics[edit]

As of 27 February 2013
Club performance League Cup Continental Total
Club League Season Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal Europe Total
Darmstadt 98 2. Bundesliga 1984–85 32 9 1 0 33 9
1985–86 38 17 1 1 39 18
1986–87 35 18 4 3 39 21
Total 105 44 6 4 0 0 111 48
Hamburger SV Bundesliga 1987–88 31 11 2 1 4 3 37 15
1988–89 10 0 3 1 13 1
Total 41 11 5 2 4 3 50 16
1. FC Kaiserslautern 1988–89 17 5 1 0 18 5
1989–90 28 6 6 3 34 9
1990–91 22 9 1 0 0 0 23 9
Total 67 20 8 3 0 0 75 23
Bayern Munich 1991–92 30 10 1 0 4 1 35 11
1992–93 32 11 2 3 34 14
1993–94 20 7 2 3 1 0 23 10
Total 82 28 5 6 5 1 92 35
1. FC Köln 1994–95 33 14 5 1 38 15
1995–96 8 1 1 0 9 1
Total 41 15 6 1 0 0 47 16
Werder Bremen 1995–96 13 4 0 0 0 0 13 4
1996–97 23 8 2 1 25 9
1997–98 27 6 1 1 28 7
Total 63 18 3 2 0 0 66 20
Arminia Bielefeld 2. Bundesliga 1998–99 33 28 3 1 36 29
Bundesliga 1999–2000 34 11 3 0 37 11
2. Bundesliga 2000–01 31 11 2 1 33 12
Total 98 50 8 2 0 0 106 52
Karlsruher SC 2001–02 33 6 1 0 34 6
2002–03 27 12 1 1 28 13
Total 60 18 2 1 0 0 62 19
Career totals 557 204 43 21 9 4 609 229

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 25 August 2013.
Team From To Record
G W D L Win % Ref.
Darmstadt 98 1 July 2003[2] 30 June 2006[3] 102 60 16 26 58.82
Greuther Fürth 1 July 2007[5] 26 May 2008[6] 36 15 10 11 41.67
Bayer Leverkusen 26 May 2008[6] 30 June 2009[7] 40 19 7 14 47.50 [18]
Hamburger SV 1 July 2009[7] 26 April 2010[10] 51 22 16 13 43.14 [19]
VfB Stuttgart 13 December 2010[11] 26 August 2013[14] 119 50 24 45 42.02 [20]
Totals 348 166 73 109 47.70

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Labbadia, Bruno" (in German). kicker.de. Retrieved 12 December 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "Labbadia neuer Coach bei den "Lilien"". kicker (in German). 8 May 2003. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Lettieri übernimmt die "Lilien"". kicker (in German). 3 April 2006. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  4. ^ "Labbadia: "Eine Bauchentscheidung"". kicker (in German). 19 March 2007. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "Timms Abschied steht fest". kicker (in German). 28 March 2007. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Labbadia macht das Rennen". kicker (in German). 26 May 2008. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c "Labbadia unterschreibt bis 2012". kicker (in German). 5 June 2009. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  8. ^ "Bruno Labbadia entlassen" (in German). ZDF. 26 April 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
  9. ^ "Der HSV setzt auf Moniz" (in German). kicker.de. 26 April 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
  10. ^ a b "Hamburg axe coach Bruno Labbadia". BBC Sport (BBC). 26 April 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2010. 
  11. ^ a b "Nun soll's Labbadia richten". kicker (in German). 12 December 2010. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  12. ^ "Stuttgart's Bruno Labbadia wins the Bundesliga sack race … in August". The Guardian. 26 August 2013. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  13. ^ "Labbadia signs on at 'growing' Stuttgart". UEFA.com. 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  14. ^ a b "Bruno Labbadia released from duties". VfB Stuttgart. 26 August 2013. Retrieved 26 August 2013. 
  15. ^ "Schneider replaces Labbadia at struggling Stuttgart". UEFA.com. 26 August 2013. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  16. ^ Theweleit, Daniel (24 December 2008). "Wir nehmen den Kindern alles ab" (in German). die Tageszeitung. Retrieved 4 July 2009. 
  17. ^ Màzzaro, Tony (24 December 2008). "Prima soddisfazione di Bruno Labbadia col suo nuovo Amburgo" (in Italian). Südwestrundfunk. Retrieved 8 March 2013. 
  18. ^ "Bayer 04 Leverkusen" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  19. ^ "Hamburger SV" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  20. ^ "VfB Stuttgart" (in German). KICKER. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 

External links[edit]