Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District

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Brunswick (Brittonkill)
Central School District
Brunswick logo.svg
Quality life, quality education
Location
3992 NY Route 2
Troy, NY 12180
USA

Information
Type Public central school district
Established 1956[1]
Superintendent Louis C. McIntosh, Jr.
Staff 53[2]
Faculty 100.7 (on FTE basis)[3]
Grades Pre-K12
Number of students 1363[2]
Student to teacher ratio 13.7[3]
Color(s) Red and white          
Athletics conference Wasaren League[4]
Mascot Bengal tiger
Yearbook Triumph (High School),
Reflections (Middle School)
Budget $21,283,515[5]
Website

Coordinates: 42°45′2.5″N 73°34′1.7″W / 42.750694°N 73.567139°W / 42.750694; -73.567139

Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District (BCSD) is a rural fringe[3] central school district located east of the city of Troy whose main campus resides in the town of Brunswick in Rensselaer County, New York, United States. The district has two operating school buildings: Tamarac Elementary School (Pre-K through 5) and Tamarac Secondary School (6 through 12). The district is a member of the Rensselaer-Columbia-Greene Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), known as Questar III.

The district was created upon the centralization (consolidation) of fourteen smaller districts in Brunswick, Pittstown, Grafton, and Poestenkill in 1956[1] and the high school opened in 1958.[6] The first class graduated in 1960.[7] The district had a combined student body of 1363 during the 2007-2008 school year.[2]

History[edit]

The district was created upon the centralization (consolidation) of local schools in 1956.[1] Previously, Brunswick was serviced by twelve smaller districts, each usually made up of one single-room schoolhouse. Of those previous districts, only two of the original buildings exist in their original state.[8][9]

Pre-centralization[edit]

Map of Brunswick featuring school district boundaries in 1876

Upon the creation of the government of the Town of Brunswick in April 1807, three commissioners of schools were appointed. Their tasks were to develop schools within the town and offer funding using the Common School Fund, which the New York Legislature had set up in 1805 to help cover the costs of public education. In 1812, the Legislature developed a school district system in which each district was self-governing. These districts were typically small by necessity, so that students could walk or ride to school in a reasonable time period each day.[8]

At the time, public schools were funded by a combination of population-based state reimbursement, taxes, and tuition paid by parents. In 1867, tuition was abolished, making public education free to all. At that time, attending school was voluntary, but by 1874, it became mandatory for students aged 8 to 14. Enforcement was sometimes difficult though, especially considering the agricultural economy that the area depended upon at the time.[8]

By 1945, ten districts in Brunswick had a student population of 313 between first and ninth grades. Due to the added expenses of small districts (in an era becoming increasingly dominated by the automobile) and sometimes crumbling school facilities, the idea of consolidating smaller districts into one larger district (centralization) became a legitimate issue. By 1953, fourteen districts in Brunswick, Grafton, Pittstown, and Poestenkill were proposed for centralization. Eight of the districts were serviced by one-room schoolhouses with no running water.[1][8]

Districts preceding centralization[edit]

At the time just preceding centralization, Brunswick was served by twelve districts.[1][10][11]

District #1 is located at the corner of Menemsha and Lansing Lanes[12] and was commonly known as the Paul Springer School. The original schoolhouse was built in 1885 but burned down in 1970. The district became known as Brunswick Common School District after the Brunswick Central School District centralization. In the 1960s, students from the elementary school (the only building in the district) voted to name the school George Washington School. The district remained independent until merging into Averill Park Central School District in 1995.[13]

District #2, known as the Garfield School, is located at the corner of Moonlawn Road and New York State Route 2 (Brunswick Road).[14] The school was originally named for President James A. Garfield, who occasionally taught nearby.[15] It was owned by BCSD until the mid-1980s when it was transferred to the Town of Brunswick. It currently houses the Brunswick Community Library and Brunswick Historical Society and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.[16]

District #3 was known as the White Church School or the Horace Mann School. Little more information is easily found about the school.

District #4, known as the Pleasant Valley School, Rock Hollow School, or Cropseyville School, was located in the Pleasant Valley sector of Cropseyville on Brunswick Rd. This school was built in 1889 as a replacement for two nearby schools: one near the site of this school, and one on South Road. Today the building is a private residence.

District #5 was originally serviced by the McKinley School, located on New York State Route 7 (Hoosick Road), east of New York State Route 142 (Grange Road), and west of Town Office Road.[17] The building was built around 1872 and the building still stands, housing a local business. The replacement schoolhouse, known as the Lee School, was located at Keyes Lane and Merrill Avenue.[18] It was constructed in 1953 but soon closed due to centralization. It was then sold to the Brunswick Center Fire Department and used as a banquet hall until it was demolished in 1997 to be replaced by a new town community center.

District #6, most commonly known as the Little Red Schoolhouse, but also sometimes known as the Lincoln School, Brick School, or Rocky Road School, is located at the corner of Buck Road and New York State Route 278 (Brick Church Road).[19] Built around 1830, the building is the oldest standing schoolhouse in Brunswick and is still owned by BCSD. It underwent renovations in the 1970s and received additional refurbishments in the latter half of the 2000s (decade). It was added to National Register of Historic Places in 2008.[20]

District #7, known as the VanArnum School, was located on Grange Road north of Calhoun Drive. The school was closed and sold at public auction in 1953. District #7 was centralized into Lansingburgh Central School District.

District #8, located on Hoosick Road across from Mickle Hill Road, was known as the Haynerville School, most likely named for the hamlet. District #9, known as the Moody School, was located on Dater Hill Road. District #10, located on Brunswick Road, east of St. Mary's Cemetery entrance,[21] was centralized into the Enlarged City School District of Troy. District #11, called the Sycaway School, was located on the corner of Hoosick Street and Lee Avenue. This district was consolidated into the Enlarged City School District of Troy and is the current site of School 18, one of that district's elementary schools. District #12 was known as the Tamarac School, which is the namesake of the current schools on the main campus. It was located on Camel Hill Road, off Tamarac Road. The school was built in 1864, but collapsed under the weight of snow during the winter of 1994-95.

Centralization[edit]

In January 1945, the Town of Brunswick Trustees created a committee charged with gathering facts about school district centralization and reporting back to the community. In late 1945, the committee proposed a plan to the New York State Education Department, which was approved. Unfortunately the plan was out of the scope of a reasonable budget. By late 1950, town residents began commenting on the inadequacies of the then current infrastructure, equipment, and services within their schools. In early 1952, the district superintendent created a committee made up of one member from each school district to reevaluate centralization. By July 1953, the committee was formed and a chairman elected. That August, committee members met with members of the Education Department to discuss school programs and expected expenditures. It is estimated that an average teacher's salary would be $3,750 in 1956. In March 1954, the Centralization Committee produced a pamphlet entitled Digest of Facts to inform the community of the project. In April 1954, a citizens' advisory committee was created, made up of 48 individuals, representing all districts involved in centralization. By August, the committee produced A Partnership in Education pamphlet to be distributed in the area. On October 8, 1956, the citizens' committee voted to centralize and the first Board of Education was elected.[22]

"Brittonkill"[edit]

Map of BCSD[23]

While the official name of the district is that of the encompassing town,[3][2][24] the name Brittonkill has been in use since 1956.[25] The name is a combination of the names of the four main towns served by the district: Brunswick, Pittstown, Grafton, and Poestenkill. The district held a competition in late 1955 to replace its name "Central School District No. 2 of the Towns of Brunswick, Grafton, Pittstown and Poestenkill". First prize was Brittonkill, submitted by Charles Meeson (also the district treasurer at the time); second prize was "Pittwick", a combination of Brunswick and Pittstown, submitted by Sally Parker; and third prize was "Rock Hollow", the name of a hamlet just east of Cropseyville, submitted (coincidentally) by both Cynthia Pope and Susan Kehn.[26] The Board of Education did not adopt "Brittonkill" on the first attempt, voting four to four on January 12, 1956,[25] and the naming issue was tabled indefinitely on February 9, 1956.[27]

The name can be found in use throughout the district. For example, the school's website uses the name Brittonkill rather than Brunswick <http://brittonkill.k12.ny.us>, the district seal (see above) uses Brittonkill, and all district buses are labeled "Brittonkill Central Schools". In addition, the Brittonkill Teachers' Association, Brittonkill PTSA, Brittonkill Educational Enrichment Program, and Brittonkill Education Foundation all make use of the name.

Media and official references to the district typically use the name Brunswick[28] (as with budget votes and school closings) and sometimes "Brunswick (Brittonkill)", although many times the district is referred to (incorrectly) as Brittonkill Central School District.[3] Sports reports will usually reference the Tamarac Bengals. On rare occasions, the school buildings may incorrectly be referred to as Brittonkill High/Middle/Elementary School.

Geography[edit]

The district is bordered by Hoosic Valley Central School District and Hoosick Falls Central School District to the north; Berlin Central School District to the east; Averill Park Central School District to the south; and Enlarged City School District of Troy and Lansingburgh Central School District to the west.[29]

Administration[edit]

Board of Education[edit]

The Board of Education (BOE) is the authoritative legislative body of the school district. It approves policy and funding; sets committees and district priorities; and approves employment (including the Superintendent) within the district, among other things. The president of the BOE is the de facto Chief Financial Officer of the district and the spokesperson of the Board.[30] According to official policy:

The Board of Education is a legislative body responsible for the governance of the Brunswick School District in a manner consistent with the laws, rules and regulations of the State of New York and the United States of America... and as a body, is the unit of authority for the School District[31]

Members are elected by district residents that are registered to vote. The election takes place on the third Tuesday in May annually.[32] This is the same day as the budget vote. Each year, three board seats are up for election. Board members are not paid for their services to the district.

The BOE is made up of nine members, each serving a three-year term; there are no term limits.[33] The current members are Matt Wade (President), Mike Fortun (Vice President), Robert Fitzgerald, Anthony Grab, Jacklyn Lindemann, Margaret McCarthy, Jack Roddey, Leah Wertz, and Judy Wienman.[34]

Superintendent of Schools[edit]

The Superintendent of Schools is Dr. Angelina Bergin,[36] who began her tenure on July 1, 2013.[37] The Superintendent is the Chief Executive and Administrative Officer of the district,[38] is the official district spokesperson,[39] and has ex officio membership to all district committees.[40] The Superintendent is responsible for the day to day operations of the district in addition to administering policies of the Board.

Below is an incomplete list of past superintendents (incomplete in that it only spans back to 1984):

  • Lou McIntosh:2010-2013
  • John Yagielski: 2007[41] until 2008[37] (Interim)
  • David T. Burnham: 2006[42] until 2007[43]
  • Teresa Thayer Snyder, PhD: 2003[44] until 2006[45]
  • Patrick DiCaprio: 2002 until 2003[44] (Interim)
  • John R. Gratto, PhD: 1998[46] until 2002[44]
  • William H. Heath, III, PhD: 1998 (Interim)[47]
  • Barbara Nagler, PhD: 1990[48] until 1998[46]
  • Jerome Ochs: 1984[49] until 1990[48]

Schools[edit]

Tamarac Secondary School (then Tamarac High School) opened in 1958[6] and the first class graduated in 1960.[7] The building serves grades 6 through 12, has a total staffing of 81.3 (on FTE basis),[50] 685 students,[2] and has kept average class sizes below 25 pupils from 2004 to 2007.[2] There is one building principal and one building assistant principal.[51]

Tamarac Secondary School

The district auditorium is located within the Secondary School. This is where graduations, school plays, concerts, and some BOE meetings take place. The auditorium lobby is also a polling place during general elections and budget votes.[52]

The Secondary School hosts a state of the art video production studio, allowing students to take part in all aspects of the media production process.[53] Morning announcements are produced live in the studio, hosted by a teacher and student.

Tamarac Elementary School

The red "TAMARAC" letters found on the front façade of the building (see image at left) were the class gift of the Class of 2003[54]

Tamarac Elementary School opened in 1965.[55] It currently serves grades Pre-K through 5. The building has a total staffing of 55.92 (on FTE basis),[56] 668 students,[57] and has kept average class sizes at or below 22 pupils from 2004 to 2007.[57] There is one building principal.[57]

While the latest school report card[58] and NCES records[3] do not mention a Pre-K program, one has been initiated during the 2008-2009 school year on a limited basis.[59]

Student body[edit]

Testing scores[edit]

Data of passing rates (≥ 65%) for students taking Regents exams in the 2006-2007 school year:[24]

  • Comprehensive English: 82%
  • Math A: 96%
  • Math B: 93%
  • Global History and Geography: 68%
  • US History and Government: 87%
  • Living Environment: 91%
  • Earth Science: 82%
  • Chemistry: 75%
  • Physics: 76%
  • Comprehensive French: 100%
  • Comprehensive Russian: Not listed by NYS
  • Comprehensive Spanish: 98%

Other statistics[edit]

According to reports, more than 90% of the class of 2007 intended on attending either a two-year or four-year college after graduating high school, almost half of which planned on attending a four-year institution.[24] The following is additional data for the 2006-2007 school year:[24]

Curriculum[edit]

The district follows the general curriculum set forth by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York, under the direction of the Commissioner of Education and the New York State Education Department. To graduate, a student must have at least four credits each of English and social studies; three credits each of math and science; two credits each of gym class and foreign language classes; one credit of fine art; and one-half credit of health class. The student must also have at least 22 credits overall and pass a prescribed amount of state tests to receive a Regents diploma. For all subjects except gym and health, a full-year course is equal to one credit. Each year of gym class is equal to one-half credit and one-half year of health class is equal to the required amount of health credit.[60]

In addition, the secondary school offers many electives such as digital photography, media production, studio in art, drawing, painting, band, chorus, choralaires, Latin roots, public speaking, fundamentals of Microsoft Office Suite, in addition to many others. The secondary school offers two AP classes: AP US History and AP Physics (B and C).[60] The district's foreign language options include Spanish, French, and Russian.[60] Most of this information can be found in the High School Curriculum Guide, which is published by the high school Counseling Center.[60]

Students have the opportunity to take part in a number of New Visions programs offered by Questar III and Capital Region BOCES. New Visions programs are higher-level and hands-on learning programs offered to students that apply to take it their senior years and take place at different locations around the capital district. Choices include the New Visions: Math, Engineering, Science, and Technology program, the New Visions: Medicine and Allied Health[dead link] program, New Visions: Scientific Research and World Health[dead link] program, the New Visions: Visual and Performing Arts[dead link] program, New Visions: Health Career Exploration program, the New Visions: Health Services and Special Education program, the New Visions: Law and Government program, and the New Visions: Journalism and Media Studies program.[60]

Dependent upon funding, students also have the opportunity to attend the new four-year Tech Valley High School. Even if a student attends Tech Valley High School, the student still receives their diploma from their home school district.[61]

Athletics[edit]

Tamarac Bengals mascot

All of the athletic teams are known as the Tamarac Bengals. Football offers varsity, junior varsity (JV), and modified teams. The varsity team is in Class C and in 2008 had its first winning season in over a decade. Soccer offers varsity, JV, and modified teams for both boys and girls. The boys' varsity team is in Class B of the Wasaren League and won the sectionals game against Cohoes in 2008,[62] but lost the regionals game to Plattsburgh.[63][64] Basketball offers varsity, JV, and modified for both boys and girls. For the school's fiftieth anniversary, the athletic department released a list of the top 50 boys' varsity players of all time.[65] Cheerleading is offered both for football and basketball seasons. Baseball[dead link] and girls' softball[dead link] both offer varsity and JV teams. Wrestling offers varsity, JV, and modified teams. Volleyball is only offered to girls and has varsity, JV, and modified teams. Cross country offers varsity and modified teams and includes many athletes from the track and field team. Recently added was a golf team.[66][67]

Student organizations[edit]

The high school offers a significant number of extracurricular student organizations. One of the major events is the school play. The high school and middle school each have a play on opposite years. In 2008, the high school presented their adaptation of Beauty and the Beast.

In addition, the school offers these student organizations:[68]

  • Best Buddies Club
  • Biology Club
  • Book Club
  • Bowling Club (Middle School)
  • Class Council, Freshman
  • Class Council, Sophomore
  • Class Council, Junior
  • Class Council, Senior
  • Drama Club
  • Jazz Ensemble
  • Kids Care Community
  • Key Club
  • Masterminds Team
  • National Honor Society (grade 12 only)
  • National Junior Honor Society (both grades 8 and 9)
  • School Play
  • Ski Club
  • Student Senate
  • Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD)
  • Table-top Gamers Club
  • Yearbook (Triumph)

Infrastructure[edit]

The former Parker School

Besides the two school buildings on the main campus, the district also owns another school building, Parker School, in Pittstown.

The campus has one main sports field, complete with bleachers, a reporters' box, concession stand, and newly installed storage building. The track that surrounds the main field underwent a significant upgrade in the late 1990s from a small dirt track to a professional running track. The field is used for both football and soccer. The area is also used for track and field events such as high jump, long jump, and pole vault. Elsewhere on campus there are three soccer fields, one baseball diamond, two softball diamonds, one outdoor basketball court, and two tennis courts.[citation needed]

The district owns and runs its own bussing service. The bus garage is located on Tamarac Road, about one half mile from the main campus.[69]

The main campus is serviced by a trickling filter type wastewater treatment plant, which replaced a large septic tank and leach field in the early 2000s (decade).[citation needed]

See also[edit]

Education-related[edit]

Geographical[edit]

Printed works[edit]

  • Zankel, Sharon Martin. Images of America: Brunswick. 1st. Great Britain: Arcadia Publishing/Brunswick Historical Society, 1998. pp 69–80. ISBN 0-7524-1306-6.

Notable documents[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Zankel, Sharon Martin (1998). Images of America: Brunswick. Arcadia Publishing/Brunswick Historical Society. pp. 69–80. ISBN 0-7524-1306-6. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "The New York State District Report Card: Accountability and Overview Report 2007—08" (PDF). State of New York Education Department Office of Information and Reporting Services. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-25. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "District Detail for Brunswick Central School District (Brittonkill) (2005-2006 School Year)". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 2008-09-29. 
  4. ^ "Athletic Handbook" (PDF). p. 9. Retrieved 2008-09-29. [dead link]
  5. ^ "Brittonkill Central School District 2008—2009 Budget Article". Retrieved 2008-09-29. [dead link]
  6. ^ a b "The Tamarac School: Erected 1958 (Commemorative Plaque) (see image)". Main Entrance: Brunswick Central School District. 
  7. ^ a b "1972 Graduation Exercises Program". Brunswick Central School District. Retrieved 2008-10-02. 
  8. ^ a b c d Waite, Diana S. (1988-04-29). "National Register of Historic Places Registration nomination, Garfield School (Javascript)". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2009-06-12. 
  9. ^ Zankel, Sharon (2008-04-22). "National Register of Historic Places nomination, District 6 Schoolhouse (Javascript)". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2009-06-12. 
  10. ^ Photographic Files Binder Schools I-I. Title Page. Key to School Districts in File I I Schools. Brunswick Historical Society. 
  11. ^ Photographic Files Binder Schools II-I. Title Page. Key to School Districts in File II I Schools. Brunswick Historical Society. 
  12. ^ 42°42′46.5″N 73°38′20.7″W / 42.712917°N 73.639083°W / 42.712917; -73.639083
  13. ^ Picchi, Joe (1995-01-17). "District Merger Expected July 1". Times Union (Albany). pp. B4. Retrieved 2008-10-01. [dead link]
  14. ^ 42°43′49.5″N 73°35′51.9″W / 42.730417°N 73.597750°W / 42.730417; -73.597750
  15. ^ Leith, Liz (c. 1996). "Garfield Library's History". Brunswick Library. Retrieved 2008-12-10. [dead link]
  16. ^ "About Us §Garfield School". Brunswick Historical Society. Retrieved 2008-10-23. 
  17. ^ 42°45′26″N 73°36′50″W / 42.75722°N 73.61389°W / 42.75722; -73.61389
  18. ^ 42°45′12″N 73°37′12″W / 42.75333°N 73.62000°W / 42.75333; -73.62000
  19. ^ 42°45′04.25″N 73°34′28.78″W / 42.7511806°N 73.5746611°W / 42.7511806; -73.5746611
  20. ^ "Weekly List of Actions Taken on Priorities: 8/18/08 through 8/22/08 (August 29, 2008)". National Park Service: National Register of Historic Places. 2008-07-03. Retrieved 2009-01-20. 
  21. ^ 42°43′27″N 73°39′36.5″W / 42.72417°N 73.660139°W / 42.72417; -73.660139
  22. ^ Brunswick and School Centralization: Photographic Files Binder Schools II-I. Brunswick Historical Society. 
  23. ^ "American Fact Finder Reference Maps (Make Your Own)". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-10-23. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f "The New York State District Report Card: Comprehensive Information Report 2006—07" (PDF). State of New York Education Department Office of Information and Reporting Services. 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  25. ^ a b Minutes of Central School District No. 2 of the Towns of Brunswick, Grafton, Pittstown and Poestenkill. January 12, 1956. Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District Archives
  26. ^ Minutes of Central School District No. 2 of the Towns of Brunswick, Grafton, Pittstown and Poestenkill. December 8, 1955. Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District Archives
  27. ^ Minutes of Central School District No. 2 of the Towns of Brunswick, Grafton, Pittstown and Poestenkill. February 9, 1956. Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District Archives
  28. ^ "Rensselaer County School Budget and Board of Education Election Results". Times Union (Albany). 2008-05-21. Retrieved 2008-09-30. [dead link]
  29. ^ "Rensselaer County School Districts (Map)". Capital District Regional Planning Commission. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  30. ^ "District Policy Handbook, Article VI, §6.120-01R". Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District. Retrieved 2008-09-29. 
  31. ^ "District Policy Handbook, Article I, §1.110-00". Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District. Retrieved 2008-09-29. 
  32. ^ "New York State School Finance Reform: New York State School Aid Budget Process §Local School Funding: May". The Gottesman Libraries at Teachers College. Retrieved 2008-10-11. 
  33. ^ "District Policy Handbook, Article II, §2.110-00". Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District. Retrieved 2008-09-29. 
  34. ^ "Board of Education Members". Brunswick (Brittonkill) Central School District. Retrieved 2012-02-17. [dead link]
  35. ^ "Brunswick Central School District - Brittonkill: Past Members of the Board of Education (Commemorative Plaque) (see image)". Board of Education Meeting Room, Secondary Library: Brunswick Central School District. 
  36. ^ "District Office Personnel". Brunswick Central School District. Retrieved 2008-09-29. [dead link]
  37. ^ a b "Brittonkill Central School District Names New Superintendent". Brunswick Central School District. Retrieved 2014-01-24. [dead link]
  38. ^ "Employment Agreement between BCSD and Louis McIntosh, Jr.: Article II, §1" (PDF). seethroughny.com, originally Brunswick Central School District. Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  39. ^ "District Policy Handbook, Article VI, §6.120-01R". Brunswick Central School District. Retrieved 2008-09-29. 
  40. ^ "District Policy Handbook, Article VI, §3.100-01". Brunswick Central School District. Retrieved 2008-09-28. 
  41. ^ Crowe (II), Kenneth C. (2007-06-13). "Brunswick superintendent on leave". Times Union (Albany). pp. A6. Retrieved 2008-10-01. [dead link]
  42. ^ O'Brien, Tim (2006-12-13). "Brunswick names superintendent". Times Union (Albany). pp. B3. Retrieved 2008-10-01. [dead link]
  43. ^ Vielkind, Jimmy (2007-09-05). "Panel OKs ouster of school leader". Times Union (Albany). pp. A6. Retrieved 2008-10-01. [dead link]
  44. ^ a b c O'Brien, Tim (2003-02-07). "New Superintendent Right on the Money". Times Union (Albany). pp. F1. Retrieved 2008-10-01. [dead link]
  45. ^ Yusko, Dennis (2006-06-20). "Shen names deputy superintendent". Times Union (Albany). pp. B3. Retrieved 2008-10-01. [dead link]
  46. ^ a b "Government Action". Times Union (Albany). 1998-07-02. pp. F2. Retrieved 2008-10-01.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)[dead link]
  47. ^ Picchi, Joe (1998-05-12). "Students Protest Teacher's Termination". Times Union (Albany). pp. B4. Retrieved 2008-10-05. [dead link]
  48. ^ a b Rinaldi, Ray (1990-11-16). "Brittonkill School Taps Maplewood Educator". Times Union (Albany). pp. B4. Retrieved 2008-10-01. [dead link]
  49. ^ Beidel, Tim (1990-05-11). "Brittonkill's School Chief Resigns Effective July 1". Times Union (Albany). pp. B13. Retrieved 2008-10-0.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)[dead link]
  50. ^ "Brunswick Central School District 2008-2009 Budget § High School § Middle School". Brunswick Central School District. p. 1. 
  51. ^ "Accountability and Overview Report 2006-07" (PDF). State of New York Education Department Office of Information and Reporting Services. 2008. p. 4. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  52. ^ "Elections". Town of Brunswick, New York. Retrieved 2009-12-20. 
  53. ^ Houston, Elaine (2008-01-31). "Educator of the Week: Mark Spitzer, Tamarac High School". Retrieved 2008-10-03. [dead link]
  54. ^ "Gift of the Class of 2003 (Commemorative Plaque) (see image)". Located below the "TAMARAC" sign: Brunswick Central School District. 
  55. ^ Staff writer (1965-01-15). "Select Name Of Tamarac For School". The Times Record (Troy, NY). 
  56. ^ "Brunswick Central School District 2008-2009 Budget §Elementary School §Middle School". Brunswick Central School District. p. 1. 
  57. ^ a b c "The New York State District Report Card: Accountability and Overview Report 2006—07" (PDF). State of New York Education Department Office of Information and Reporting Services. 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  58. ^ "New York State District Report Card: Accountability and Overview Report 2006-2007" (PDF). The University of the State of New York. 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  59. ^ Baker, Barbara. "Pre-K Class: About". Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  60. ^ a b c d e "Tamarac High School Curriculum Guide, 2007-2008" (PDF). Tamarac High School Counseling Center. 2007. Retrieved 2008-09-30. 
  61. ^ "Governor Pataki Signs Legislation Creating Capital Region "Tech Valley High School Program"" (PDF) (Press release). Tech Valley High School. 2005-11-10. Retrieved 2008-12-10. [dead link]
  62. ^ Martin, Sean (2008-11-04). "Sargood's goal wins it for Tamarac". Times Union (Albany). Retrieved 2008-11-09. [dead link]
  63. ^ "High School Boys Soccer: Tamarac Bengals". Times Union (Albany). Retrieved 2008-11-09. [dead link]
  64. ^ Staff Report (2008-11-09). "Maple Hill finds result what matters". Times Union (Albany). Retrieved 2008-11-09. [dead link]
  65. ^ "Tamarac names top 50; Academy rolls". Off the Record: High School Sports in the Capital Region (Troy Record). 2008-11-29. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  66. ^ "Board of Education Meeting Minutes, July 9, 2008". Brunswick Central School District. 2008-07-09. Retrieved 2008-10-02. [dead link]
  67. ^ "Tamarac Bengals' Homepage". Tamarac Booster Club. Retrieved 2008-10-01. 
  68. ^ Triumph 2008. Tamarac High School Yearbook Staff. 2008. pp. 80–83. 
  69. ^ 42°45′23.66″N 73°34′01.64″W / 42.7565722°N 73.5671222°W / 42.7565722; -73.5671222

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