Bu'eine Nujeidat

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Bu'eine Nujeidat
Hebrew transcription(s)
 • Hebrew בועיינה-נוג'ידאת
 • ISO 259 Buˀéine - Nuǧeidaˀt
Arabic transcription(s)
 • Arabic بعينة-نجيدات
Bu'eine Nujeidat is located in Israel
Bu'eine Nujeidat
Bu'eine Nujeidat
Coordinates: 32°48′26.68″N 35°22′2.2″E / 32.8074111°N 35.367278°E / 32.8074111; 35.367278Coordinates: 32°48′26.68″N 35°22′2.2″E / 32.8074111°N 35.367278°E / 32.8074111; 35.367278
Grid position 184/245 PAL
District Northern
Government
 • Type Local council (from 1980)
Area
 • Total 7,058 dunams (7.058 km2 or 2.725 sq mi)
Population (2006)
 • Total 7,900
Name meaning from personal name[1]

Bu'eine Nujeidat is an Arab local council in the North District of Israel. Made up of two villages, Bu'eine and Nujeidat, they merged in 1987 and were recognized as one local council in 1996. According to the Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), the population of 7,900 inhabitants (2006) is majority Muslim with a growth rate of 2.3%.

History[edit]

A possible Roman or Byzantine grave has been found here.[2]

Ottoman era[edit]

Victor Guérin visited in 1875.[3] In the 1881 the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) described El Baineh as "A village built on the hillside, containing 200 Moslem inhabitants. It possesses a spring, and there are olive-groves in the plain to the north."[4]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, Bu’aniyeh had a population of 212, all Muslims,[5] increasing in the 1931 census to 349, of whom 2 were Jews and the rest Muslims, in a total of 67 occupied houses.[6]

In 1945 the population of Bu'eina was 540, all Arabs, while the total land area was 9,214 dunams, according to an official land and population survey.[7] Of this, 782 were allocated for plantations and irrigable land, 13,223 for cereals,[8] while 30 dunams were classified as built-up areas.[9]

1948, and aftermath[edit]

Bu'eine was captured by the Israeli army during the second part of Operation Dekel, 15–18 July 1948.[10] It remained under Martial Law until 1966.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 124
  2. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, pp. 381-382
  3. ^ Guérin, 1880, pp. 363-364
  4. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, pp. 362-363
  5. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Nazareth, p. 38
  6. ^ Mills, 1932, p.73
  7. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 62
  8. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 109
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 159
  10. ^ Morris, 1987, p. 200

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]