Buckaroo Bugs

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Buckaroo Bugs
Looney Tunes (Bugs Bunny) series
Buckaroo Bugs title card.png
Title Card
Directed by Robert Clampett
Produced by Leon Schlesinger
Story by Lou Lilly
Voices by Mel Blanc
Robert C. Bruce (uncredited)
Music by Carl W. Stalling
Animation by M. Gould
Robert McKimson (uncredited)
Rod Scribner (uncredited)
Studio Leon Schlesinger Productions
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release date(s) August 26, 1944 (USA)
Color process Technicolor
Running time 9 minutes
Language English

Buckaroo Bugs is a Warner Bros. Looney Tunes theatrical cartoon short released in August 1944, introducing Bugs Bunny to Looney Tunes and directed by Robert Clampett.

Plot[edit]

The film is set in a small town of the "San Fernando Alley" (San Fernando Valley).[1][2] According to the narration, "Our story begins when the West was young, and early pioneers settled down to never more roam, and made the San Fernando Alley their home." [3] Despite its Western setting, the short makes references to World War II rationing. A pretend train robbery, lists as "valuable cargo": butter, gasoline, sugar, shoes, and tires – all of them items for which there was a shortage in the War due to rationing.[1] The short also has Bugs stealing all the carrots from a victory garden, which is another World War II reference.[2]

Unlike in most shorts, Bugs Bunny serves as an antagonist. In the cartoon, he plays a carrot thief called the Masked Marauder, whom Brooklyn's "Red Hot Ryder" (a parody of Red Ryder) must bring to justice. The cartoon portrays Red Hot Ryder as a dimwit who cannot distinguish Bugs Bunny from the Masked Marauder, and his good-natured slowness is consistently mocked: When Bugs Bunny as the Masked Marauder threatens to shoot Red Hot Ryder, saying, "Stick 'em up, or I'll blow your brains out," the latter treats it like a choice, replying, "Well, now, that's mighty neighborly of you." In the end, Red Hot Ryder catches on, but is unable to catch the Masked Marauder. Bugs tricks him into jumping into the Grand Canyon, and when underground Red Hot Ryder finally figures out that Bugs is the Masked Marauder. Bugs pops up from beneath the ground with a lit candle and says "That's right! That's right! You win the $64 question!" (a reference to the "big prize" on the famous radio quiz show Take It or Leave It). He then kisses him and blows out the candle.

Availability[edit]

The cartoon has been released on VHS in anonymous 'Bugs Bunny' collections, and is also featured on the fifth volume of the Looney Tunes Golden Collection DVD set, released on October 30, 2007 and the Looney Tunes Platinum Collection Volume Two DVD.

Production details[edit]

  • This was the last time the cartoon release bore Leon Schlesinger's name, as he sold his cartoon studio to Warner Bros. around the time of its release.[4]
  • While only Manny Gould was credited as an animator, Robert McKimson and Rod Scribner also aided in the process.
  • The older version of Bugs Bunny would be used again in the next Bugs short, The Old Grey Hare.

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Shull, Wilt (2004), p. 165
  2. ^ a b Young, Young (2010), p. 746
  3. ^ "Buckaroo Bugs". imdb.com. Retrieved 1 November 2013. 
  4. ^ Warner Bros. Cartoon Releases - 1944
Preceded by
Hare Force
Bugs Bunny Cartoons
1944
Succeeded by
The Old Grey Hare