Budd Hopkins

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Budd Hopkins
Born (1931-06-15)June 15, 1931
Wheeling, West Virginia, U.S.
Died August 21, 2011(2011-08-21) (aged 80)
New York, New York, U.S.
Occupation Artist
Ufologist
Organization Intruders Foundation
Website
http://www.intrudersfoundation.org

Budd Hopkins (June 15, 1931 – August 21, 2011 Manhattan)[1] was an American painter, sculptor, and prominent figure in alien abduction phenomena and related UFO research. Before his death he was romantically involved with fellow UFO and alien activist Leslie Kean.[2]

Life[edit]

Born in 1931 and raised in Wheeling, West Virginia. He graduated from Oberlin College in 1953, that same year moving to New York City, where he lived until his death in 2011.[3]

Hopkins' art is in the permanent collections in the Whitney Museum, the Guggenheim Museum, Hirshhorn Museum, and at the Museum of Modern Art; he received grants or endowments from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. His articles on art appeared in magazines and journals, and he lectured at many art schools, including Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill. In 1993 he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member and became a full Academician in 1994.

Interest in UFOs[edit]

In 1964, Hopkins and two others reported seeing a UFO in daylight for several minutes.[4] Fascinated, Hopkins joined the now-defunct UFO research group National Investigations Committee On Aerial Phenomena (NICAP) and began reading many UFO books and articles.

In 1975, Hopkins and Ted Bloecher studied a multiple-witness UFO report, the North Hudson Park UFO sightings, or the Stonehenge incident, which occurred in North Bergen, New Jersey.[5] In 1976, the Village Voice printed Hopkins' account of the investigation.

Hopkins began receiving regular letters from other UFO witnesses, including a few cases of what would later be called "missing time" — inexplicable gaps in one's memory, associated with UFO encounters.

Alien abduction[edit]

With Ted Bloecher and psychologist Aphrodite Clamar, Hopkins began investigating the missing time experiences, and eventually came to conclude that the missing time cases were due to alien abduction.

By the late 1980s, Hopkins was one of the most prominent people in ufology, earning a level of mainstream attention that was nearly unprecedented for the field.

Hopkins wrote several popular books about abductees, notably Missing Time (1981), and the best seller, Intruders: The Incredible Visitations at Copley Woods (1987), and in 1989 founded the Intruders Foundation, a non-profit organization created to document and research alien abductions, and to provide support to abductees. The organization became inactive following Hopkins' death in 2011.

For roughly the first seven years of his investigation of the abduction phenomenon, Hopkins himself conducted no hypnosis sessions. Rather, he secured the aid of licensed professionals. He noted that three of these therapists (Drs. Robert Naiman, Aphrodite Clamar and Girard Franklin) were quite skeptical of the reality of abduction claims, yet all "uncovered" detailed abduction scenarios from their patients.[6]

He is sometimes credited as having discovered the reproductive aspects of the alien encounter phenomenon, documenting reports of the creation of hybrid (later called transgenic) offspring from abductees and their alien abductors.

The 1992 made-for-television film Intruders was based on Hopkins' research, and portrayed abduction scenes. Additionally, Hopkins' 1996 book, Witnessed, portrays a classic abduction case that was alleged to have occurred in late 1989 near the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City. This case is unique in that it is one of the first publicized episodes that involved multiple abductees (who did not previously know each other) that come to know each other in the "real" world through a variety of circumstances connected to their abductions. Additionally, this case involved inter-generational abductions within the same family.

Criticism[edit]

Controversy was a persistent feature of Hopkins' career in alien abduction and UFO studies. While few seemed to doubt Hopkin's motives or sincerity, critics charged that Hopkins was out of his element when he used hypnosis, thereby aiding his subjects in confabulation — the blending of fact and fantasy. However, Hopkins insisted such criticism is specious. He wrote, "I have often frequently invited interested therapists, journalists and academics to observe hypnosis sessions. Theoretical psychologist Nicholas Humphrey, who has held teaching positions at both Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and psychiatrist Donald. F. Klein, director of research at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and professor of psychiatry at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, are but two of those who have observed my work firsthand. None of these visitors ... have reported anything that suggested I was attempting to lead the subjects." (Hopkins, 238-239)[7][8]

Carol Rainey, Hopkins' ex-wife of 10 years, who was present at the time in which he investigated the Brooklyn Bridge abduction incident, deconstructed the testimony of the primary witness of that case in a controversial article titled The Priests of High Strangeness. Rainey suggested that the primary witness was unreliable, and that other, less-sensational alien encounters were more typical of the phenomenon.[9]

Sean F. Meers, an independent researcher of the Linda Cortile Case, subsequently investigated and refuted Carol Rainey's allegations against Budd Hopkins and Linda Cortile in a comprehensive, fully referenced rebuttal to her article titled "Free-For-All: The Assassination of Budd Hopkins and Linda Cortile". Rainey's claims against Hopkins' and Cortile were proven to be inaccurate, unfounded, and originating from a biased and subjective source.[10] [11] [12] [13] [14]

Budd Hopkins, in ill health and just months before his death, managed to construct and publish two rebuttals to Carol Rainey's allegations against him and his work. The first rebuttal, released in February 2011, was titled "Deconstructing the Debunkers". The second rebuttal, released in March 2011, was titled "Comparison of Handwriting and Drawing Samples by Two Different Witnesses in the Linda Case".[15][16][17][18]

Tributes to Budd Hopkins[edit]

A collection of living and posthumous tributes to Budd Hopkins.[19] [20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Budd Hopkins - June 15, 1931 – August 21, 2011". Intruders Foundation. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "Intruders Foundation: Budd Hopkins UFO Abduction Research Foundation". Retrieved 2008-02-10. 
  3. ^ Margalit Fox (August 24, 2011). "Budd Hopkins, Abstract Expressionist and U.F.O. Author, Dies at 80". The New York Times. 
  4. ^ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/aliens/buddhopkins.html, Kidnapped by UFOs? Interview with Budd Hopkins. NOVA Online.
  5. ^ Hague, Jim (2005-08-20). "North Bergen: UFO hotspot! Thirty years after initial case, town lays claim to American's most sightings". http://hudsonreporter.com. Hudson Reporter. Retrieved 2014-02-05. 
  6. ^ Hopkins, 218, Hopkins, Budd, "Hypnosis and the Investigation of UFO Abduction Accounts"; pages 215–240 in UFOs and Abductions: Challenging the Borders of Knowledge, David M. Jacobs, editor; University Press of Kansas, 2000; ISBN 0-7006-1032-4)
  7. ^ Hopkins, Budd (September 2000), ""Hypnosis and the Investigation of UFO Abduction Accounts"", UFOs and Abductions: Challenging the Borders of Knowledge: 238–239 
  8. ^ Hopkins, Budd (September 2000), ""Hypnosis and the Investigation of UFO Abduction Accounts"", UFOs and Abductions: Challenging the Borders of Knowledge: 238–239 
  9. ^ Rainey, Carol (January 2011), "The Priests of High Strangeness", Paratopia 1 (1): 1–11 
  10. ^ Meers, Sean (April 2011), Free-For-All: The Assassination of Budd Hopkins and Linda Cortile 
  11. ^ Meers, Sean (April 2011), Free-For-All: The Assassination of Budd Hopkins and Linda Cortile webpage 
  12. ^ Meers, Sean (April 2013), [Linda Cortile] Case Related Hate Mail 
  13. ^ Meers, Sean (April 2013), [Linda Cortile] Case Related Hate Mail webpage 
  14. ^ Meers, Sean (2013), Abusive Email from Carol Rainey to Linda Cortile and Sean F. Meers 
  15. ^ Hopkins, Budd (2011), Deconstructing the Debunkers webpage 
  16. ^ Hopkins, Budd (2011), Deconstructing the Debunkers 
  17. ^ Hopkins, Budd (2011), Comparison of Handwriting and Drawing Samples by Two Different Witnesses in the Linda Case webpage 
  18. ^ Hopkins, Budd (2011), Comparison of Handwriting and Drawing Samples by Two Different Witnesses in the Linda Case 
  19. ^ Tributes to UFO Abduction Researcher Budd Hopkins webpage, 2011 
  20. ^ Tributes to UFO Abduction Researcher Budd Hopkins pdf, 2011 
  • Clark, Jerome, The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, Volume 1, A-K Detroit: Omnigraphics, 1998 (2nd edition, 2005), ISBN 0-7808-0097-4
  • Clark, Jerome, The UFO Encyclopedia: The Phenomenon from the Beginning, Volume 2, L-Z Detroit: Omnigraphics, 1998 (2nd edition, 2005), ISBN 0-7808-0097-4
  • Hopkins, Budd, Art, Life and UFOs, New York/San Antonio: Anomalist Books, 2009, ISBN 978-1-933665-41-2
  • Hopkins, Budd, "Hypnosis and the Investigation of UFO Abduction Accounts"; pages 215–240 in UFOs and Abductions: Challenging the Borders of Knowledge, David M. Jacobs, editor; University Press of Kansas, 2000; ISBN 0-7006-1032-4)
  • Klass, Philip, UFO Abductions: A Dangerous Game

External links[edit]