Buddhism in Iran

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Buddhism in Iran refers to the history of Buddhism in Iran.

From the 2nd century Parthians such as An Shigao, were active in spreading Buddhism in China. Many of the earliest translators of Buddhist literature into Chinese were from Parthia and other kingdoms linked with present-day Iran.[1]

At the time of the Arab conquests in the mid-7th century, much of the eastern Iranian world was mainly Buddhist. Afghanistan is rich in Buddhist sites; others have been found in Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and within Iran itself.[2] The Arab conquests brought the final demise of Buddhism in Eastern Iran.[3]

In recent years, Buddhism has experienced an upsurge of interest among Iranians, other particular West Asians, and also Europeans. Some of the poetry of Sohrab Sepehri shows Buddhist influence, and another major contemporary poet, Ahmad Shamlou, translated a book of Japanese haiku poetry into Persian.[4]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Willemen, Charles; Dessein, Bart; Cox, Collett; Gonda, Jan; Bronkhorst, Johannes; Spuler, Bertold; Altenmüller, Hartwig, Handbuch der Orientalistik: Sarvāstivāda Buddhist Scholasticism, Brill, pp. 128–130, ISBN 978-90-04-10231-6 
  2. ^ Richard Foltz, "Buddhism in the Iranian World," The Muslim World 100/2-3, 2010, pp. 204-214
  3. ^ Yarshater (1993). The Cambridge History of Iran. Cambridge University Press. pp. 956–7. ISBN 978-0-521-24693-4. 
  4. ^ Foltz, pp. 212-213