List of named devils in Dungeons & Dragons

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This article is about devils in the Dungeons & Dragons game world. For devils in world folklore, see Devil. For for other uses, see Devil (disambiguation).

Within the Dungeons & Dragons role playing game materials, a number of devils are given characteristics or roles within the story lines. This is a list of the devils that have appeared in the various materials as characters that are specifically named.

Some of the characters are based on devils in folklore traditions, while some were created specifically for the game.

Contents

Abigor[edit]

Abigor
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Baalzebul
Design details

Abigor is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Abigor appears as a large hairless humanoid with small horns, black hooves, a forked tail and ochre skin. He has large crimson bat wings and a loud, bellowing voice. Abigor is a vassal of Baalzebul, commanding 60 companies of cornugons (horned devils). He was nearly slain by Nisroch, for which Nisroch was sentenced to become one of the Rabble of Devilkin.

Abigor first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Abigor was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Abigor was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Adonides[edit]

Adonides
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Mephistopheles
Design details

Adonides is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Adonides appears as a young, long-haired, darkly handsome man of giant stature. He has unusual glittering black eyes and a fanged grin. The hair hides two small horns; Adonides wears robes to hide his short forked tail and scarlet torso. Adonides is a vassal of Mephistopheles, serving as Mephistopheles's steward.

Adonides first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Adonides was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Adramalech[edit]

Adramalech
Game background
Title(s) Chancellor
Keeper of Records
Home plane Baator
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful evil
Portfolio Record-keeping, child sacrifice
Domains Evil, Knowledge, Law
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Adramalech is a powerful Duke of Hell, serving Asmodeus as his chancellor, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Adramalech somewhat resembles an elderly human man with a gray beard. His eyes are cold and wet, changing in hue according to his mood and only his small, crimson horns and forked tail mark him obviously as a devil. His loose, flowing, green, purple, russet, or black robes conceal his crimson, scaly back and his slimy, yellow-green belly. Adramalech is the chancellor of Asmodeus and a rival of Asmodeus's inquisitor, Phongor.

Adramalech first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Adramalech was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] Adramalech was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[5]

Agares[edit]

Agares
Game background
Title(s) Duke of Hell
Home plane Baator
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful evil
Portfolio "Immoral expressions"
Domains n/a
Superior Levistus
Design details

Agares is a Duke of Hell in the service of Levistus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. There is also a vestige available to members of the Binder class in third edition named Agares, but it represents a different individual. Agares takes a form resembling that of an ancient, human man, his voice shaky and frail. His feet are reptilian and covered in gray scales, and his gray-bearded face is a ruddy human tone that deepens to a deep scarlet on his deformed, knotted torso (although this isn't normally evident, as his robes reach to his neck). His tail is stumpy, and covered in the same gray scales as his feet. His horns are gray, too. He has watery red eyes and red, clawlike nails. He leans on a staff shod with iron. Agares commands 31 companies of bone devils. Each company includes 333 soldiers.

Agares first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Agares was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3] Agares was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[5]

Alastor the Grim[edit]

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, Alastor (/əˈlæstɔr/ ə-LAS-tor)[7] is a pit fiend, a devil in the service of Asmodeus. He is known by the epithet the Grim and his titles include Executioner of Hell. Alastor is said to be the greatest pit fiend of them all. His wings are broken and his body is covered in scars. His strength is like a storm giant's. Alastor is a vassal of Asmodeus. There are those who claim that if Asmodeus could choose only one companion, it would be Alastor the Grim. Alastor first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Amduscias[edit]

Amduscias
Game background
Title(s) Reconciliator of Foes
Home plane Baator
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful evil
Portfolio n/a
Domains n/a
Superior Tiamat
Design details

Amduscias is a duke in the service of Tiamat, and leads 29 companies of abishai. He lives on Avernus, the first layer of Baator. He is famous for his long memory, and almost as well known for his cunning strategies. He has also earned the moniker “Reconciliator of Foes,” by being a skillful actor and negotiator. Tiamat often employs him to mediate disputes between devils and dragons. Amduscias is also tasked with keeping the Rabble of Devilkin in line. Amduscias is inspired by the real-life Amdusias.

Amduscias usually appears as a 9-foot-tall (2.7 m) hawk-headed man wearing dark red or black robes, and never wears armor. He can also change into two distinct forms. He can resemble a dirty-yellow unicorn with eyes of flame, and a purple horn that causes terrible bleeding wounds. He can bolt from a standing start, and some say that whenever horses spook or gallop uncontrollably, Amduscias has affected them. He also likes to take the form of a dire wolf with a prehensile tail like that of a serpent.

Amduscias prefers to fight in his wolf form. He can use all of his attacks on as many targets as he wishes. One favorite tactic is to constrict a foe with his tail and immerse the victim in water to drown, batter the victim against a rock, or use whatever advantage he can gain with the tail. In human form, he dual-wields two small weapons of his choice (such as daggers or darts), and likes to point at a victim to affect with his fear ability. Amduscias can speak with any creature that has a language. Amduscias is a servant of Tiamat, for whom he leads 29 companies of abishai. Each company contains 333 abishai each. Amduscias originally served Zariel, the previous lord of Avernus, but was granted into the service of Tiamat in exchange for her aid in guarding the entrance to the second layer of Hell. This arrangement continued unchanged with the reign of Bel.

Amduscias first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[8] Amduscias was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[9] Amduscias was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Asmodeus[edit]

Asmodeus
Game background
Title(s) King of Hell, Lord of the Ninth, Prince of Nessus
Home plane Baator, the Nine Hells
Power level Greater Deity
Alignment Lawful Evil
Portfolio Sin (all), Tyranny (4th edition)
Superior None
Design details

Asmodeus (/æzmɵˈdəs/ az-mo-DAY-əs or /æzˈmdiəs/ az-MOH-dee-əs)[7] is the Lord of Hell/Baator and the Overlord of the lesser Dukes of Hell. Through all four editions of Dungeons & Dragons, Asmodeus is depicted as the strongest, most cunning, and most handsome of all devils. He is typically described as appearing as a giant human, over 13 feet tall, with dark skin and hair, red eyes, handsome features, and small horns on his forehead. He dresses in regal finery of unimaginable expense; a single article of clothing worn by Asmodeus is worth more money than an average nation will spend on food in a year. Beneath his clothing, Asmodeus' body is covered in bloody wounds which he sustained when he fell from the Upper Planes. His wounds ooze blood daily, and any drop of blood which touches the ground grows into a powerful devil.He is described in the Book of Vile Darkness as a "calm, chillingly reasonable" being with a modest appearance that hides his true power.

According to the Guide to Hell, though he has worshipers and does occasion to grant them clerical powers, his true identity as Ahriman makes him loath to expand his cult. This is because his true motivation is to spread atheism through the multiverse and make all believe that "gods" are not divine at all, but beings who have achieved great power. In his plan, when belief fails, the outer planes will cease to exist. As Ahriman the evil lawmaker of the whole of the cosmos and unfettered by belief himself, he can then remold the multiverse perfectly according to his desires, and this time not having to share in its creation with Jazirian: the good creator of the multiverse's orderly structure. There will be no remnant of chaos as a result, or any missing rules in this future outer ring of planes, which will be the exclusive domain of Asmodeus.[10]

Asmodeus first appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977).[11][12] He has been featured in books into the 4th edition as an evil god in the Dungeon Masters Guide (2008).[13] His backstory for this edition is expanded in the supplements Manual of the Planes, The Plane Above: Secrets of the Astral Sea, and Demonomicon. His origins are explicitly defined as the leader of a rebellion. His fictional biography has been retoconned to justify changes from previous editions' settings.[14] He also appears in Eberron as the undisputed master of the Nine Hells.[15] Asmodeus appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 23.[16]

His appearance in Dungeons & Dragons was cited as evidence for Satanism in the game by Pat Pulling and Kathy Cawthon in their 1989 book The Devil's Web.[17] The inclusion of Asmodeus and other Judeo-Christian devils in Dungeons & Dragons is discussed in the pages of Pegasus magazine as well.[18]

Family[edit]

Asmodeus' chief consort, before her death, was a devil named Bensozia. Together they had a daughter named Glasya, who now rules over the sixth layer of Baator. The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Asmodeus on Nessus. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Adramalech — Chancellor of Hell, Keeper of Records (DR76).
  • Alastor the Grim, pit fiend — Executioner.
  • Baalberith (/ˈblbərɪθ/ BAYL-bər-ith[7]), pit fiend — Major domo.
  • Bensozia — Consort of Asmodeus, Queen of Hell (Deceased) (DR76).
  • Buer — 15 companies of pit fiends (DR76).
  • Bune — 30 companies of cornugons (DR76).
  • Glasya - Daughter of Asmodeus and Bensozia, former Mistress of the Erinyes, now Lord of the Sixth (DR76).
  • Martinet, pit fiend — Constable.
  • Morax — 9 companies of pit fiends (DR76).
  • Phongor — Inquisitor of Hell (DR76).
  • Rimmon — 5 companies of gelugons (DR76).
  • The Spark Hunters - Lord Asmodeus's personal guard of 13 hamatula rangers/mortal hunters who capture and/or slay mortals who draw their master's ire.
  • Zagum — 30 companies of hamatula (DR76).

Baalphegor[edit]

Baalphegor
Game background
Title(s) Arch-Duchess of Cania, Consort to Mephistopheles
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Domains Inventions, arts
Superior Mephistopheles, Asmodeus
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, Baalphegor is the consort of Mephistopheles, the arch-devil currently ruling Cania, the 8th layer of the Nine Hells of Baator.

Creative origins[edit]

Baalphegor is named for a male demon of Christian mythology named Belphegor, who is also concerned with artful inventions and often takes the form of a woman. Ultimately, Baalphegor is derived from the Moabite god Baal-Peor, mentioned in Numbers 25.[citation needed]

Publishing history[edit]

Baalphegor's name first appears in a list of unique devils complied by Gary Gygax in "New denizens of devildom: A partial preview of Monster Manual II" in Dragon #75 (July 1983).[19] Baalphegor was given a detailed treatment in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (August 1983), on pages 28–29.[1] Baalphegor also appeared in the roster of diabolic nobles in the 1st edition Monster Manual II (1983).[20] She appeared as the ultimate villain of the adventure "Caermor" by Nigel Findley in Dungeon #2 (November 1986), on pages 33–44 with her game statistics (adapted from the Dragon #76 article) on page 37.[21] Findley provides a caution about using her in the adventure: "Though extremely powerful, Baalphegor was not included in order to crush the player characters. She should be played with care and cleverness, befitting her extreme intelligence."[21] This adventure was reprinted in the Dungeons of Despair anthology (1999).[22]

Baalphegor has been mentioned briefly on occasion since then in her role as Mephistopheles' consort. Baalphegor was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Physical description[edit]

Baalphegor is described in Dragon #76 as personally attractive, "charming in manner and artful in thought".[1] She is described as a sleek and curvaceous human-appearing she-devil with cinnamon-colored skin, ruby-red eyes, forked tail, as well as slim, delicate leathery wings. She appears young and carefree but when angered, her eyes glow with flames and her usually musical voice becomes very harsh. She is noted in the article as being only five and a half feet in height.[1]

Relationships[edit]

Baalphegor is described in Dragon #76 as the consort of Mephistopheles, but the article also notes that "Asmodeus regards her as one of his most valuable assets and tolerates the machinations of Mephistopheles largely because of her".[1] She is described as a practiced diplomat, and although her own desires are seldom revealed, she appears to be loyal to the Hells and devotes to Mephistopheles, managing to avoid making a distinction between the two.[1] She has many allies among the pit fiends as well.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Baalphegor is said to have been around since the creation of Baator itself. She's a very skilled diplomat and tactician, and an unmatched sorceress. She has created many artifacts and techniques used throughout the Nine Hells. In addition to her status, this fact granted her a deep respect from almost everyone in Baator, even from Asmodeus, who appreciates her to the point of letting her live with her ever-scheming consort.

In terms of politics, Baalphegor is said to have once been the ruler of Cania, a position she obtained very long ago, even before Asmodeus seized control of Baator.[citation needed] She turned the ancient arch-lords of Baator against each other in order for her to remain in charge, but she was ultimately considered far too powerful and was made consort to Gargauth, an arch-devil who ended up expelled from the Nine Hells for his foul nature to become one of the deities of the Forgotten Realms. Baalphegor then became the consort of Mephistopheles when he took the rulership of Cania from Rimmon, another ancient arch-lord who now serves in Asmodeus's armies.

NOTE: Much of this history has been overturned by the recent Fiendish Codex II, which states that Baator itself was a creation of Asmodeus and that he, Dispater, and Mephistopheles were the first Archdevils to set foot on the plane. Thus, Baalphegor was never ruler of Cania (i.e., it has always been Mephistopheles).

Knowing all too well her master's position, Baalphegor keeps her goals to herself, acting with a minimal degree of loyalty to the Lord of the Eighth. Mephistopheles tolerates this due to the protection given by his consort's presence. Asmodeus never wished to have her as his consort (although the canny she-devil is clearly trying to get more of his attention), as he prefers having a powerful underling at his disposal rather than a shrewd witch at his side.

Along with Lilis, Baalphegor is the consort who has retained her position the longest without any real trouble.

In the adventure "Caermor" in Dungeon #2, Baalphegor takes the form of a cute, blonde-haired human girl of the apparent age of 10 and living as an orphan in the small village of Caermor. Using the alias of Belle Fagor, she secretly tests the mettle of a coven of devil worshippers dwelling in the area, as a sort of "game". To "enliven a short stretch of eternity", she began to stir up trouble after the mad cult leader's requests for a devil became known in the Nine Hells, watching but taking no direct actions as part of the "rules" of her game.[21]:37 A bartender - secretly a member of the coven - and his wife are acting as her foster parents; Belle has magically charmed them so that they don't suspect her involvement with the devil.[21]:38 She has ordered the devil, a red abishai, not to summon any others of its kind or change its appearance; this suits the rules of her game, as she wants opponents to know what they are facing.[21]:40 If the player characters slay the devil, she reveals her true self to the coven and orders them to attack the party.[21]:41 If the party defeats both the coven and the devil, she abandons her game and visits the adventurers in the form of Belle, thanking them for the entertainment they provided her; she then transofrms into her true form and darkly promises that she will have more "fun" with the party in the future, "since it seems to think it's good at fighting devils", and then vanishes.[21]:37

Dungeon #135 suggests that Baalphegor has disappeared, and her personal guard, the Blessed Angels, now begrudgingly serve others instead.[23]

Artifacts[edit]

A vial-shaped artifact called Baalphegor's Grace was created by Mephistopheles over 600 years ago to hold the blood and tears of his consort for loan to his favored cultists on the Prime Material Plane. However, recent events in Hell have consumed Mephistopheles's attention for the last several decades, and he has lost track of where Baalphegor's Grace is. A decade ago it came into the possession of the undead dragon Lashonna.[23]

Any who drink from Baalphegor's Grace will find their minds turning to evil or die. Those who drink successfully become linked to a flock of 15 erinyes known, with dark irony, as the Blessed Angels. These erinyes were once Baalphegor's personal guard before she apparently disappeared from Mephistopheles's court.[23]

Apocrypha[edit]

Baalphegor, as Belphegor, was mentioned in passing in Dragon #28 as one of the archdevils who sided with Baalzebul in his coup against the previous master of Hell.[24]

An article in Kobold Quarterly offers a very different take on Baalphegor at odds with D&D canon.[25]

Baalzebul[edit]

Baalzebul
Game background
Title(s) Archduke of Maladomini, Lord of the Seventh, Lord of Lies, the Fallen One, the Slug Archduke
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Portfolio Flies, lies
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, Baalzebul /ˈblzɨbʌl/ BAYL-ze-bul[7] is a fictional character, described as an Arch-Devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), also called the "Lord of the Flies."

Baalzebul is lord of Maladomini, the Seventh Plane of Hell. His symbols include a fly's head, a web with flies dangling from it, and an enthroned slug.

Creative origins[edit]

Baalzebul is based on the Beelzebub of mythology and demonology.[26]

Publication history[edit]

Baalzebul first appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977).[12] Baalzebul's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[27]

Baalzebul did not initially appear in 2nd edition, and in the Planescape line the lord of Maladomini instead a fallen archon named Triel. Eventually, Triel was revealed as another name for Baalzebul, in Guide to Hell (1999).[28]

In third edition, Baalzebul appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[29] Baalzebul was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Baalzebul is still the lord of Maladomini.[30]

Description[edit]

Prior to the Reckoning of Hell, Baalzebul took on the appearance of a tall, dark-skinned humanoid with compound eyes resembling a fly. However, as a result of his role in the Reckoning, Asmodeus transformed Baalzebul, who now appears as a giant slug-like creature which trails feces and garbage wherever he goes. Flies crawl over his body at all times, and his arms are tiny and malformed.[3] However, he almost has enough divine Energy to return to his original form, and his return is inevitable.[4]

Relationships[edit]

Baalzebul is the sworn enemy of both Mephistopheles and Dispater and would do anything to oppose them. He also has a tentative alliance with Belial, whose aid he would probably come to if he could discover some advantage in doing so. It is worth noting that although he openly plots against Mephistopheles he also secretly nurses a hate for Asmodeus for cursing him with his current appearance. Baalzebul's consorts are Baftis and Lilith.[4]

Vassals[edit]

The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Baalzebul. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

Dogma[edit]

Baalzebul teaches the use of lies and charm backed with deadly force to achieve one's desire. He wishes to regain his original form, but even more than that he desires to avenge himself against Asmodeus.

Scriptures[edit]

Baalzebul played a part in writing the Book of Vile Darkness.

Worshippers[edit]

Baalzebul attracts to his service nonconformists, revolutionaries, and plotters of coups. His cults are as much conspiracies as religious orders, much better at bringing down governments than ruling them. They typically undermine good or neutral governments with a combination of charm, lies, and the judicious use of assassinations.

Many of Baalzebul's worshippers are bugbears, who appreciate the combination of guile and violence that Baalzebul espouses.

Clergy[edit]

Clerics of Baalzebul customarily shave their heads and wear robes of blue and black, along with gold jewelry and piercings. Their favored weapon is the morningstar. Disciples of Baalzebul are liars, cheats, and thieves.

Temples[edit]

After Baalzebul's cultists successfully undermine a government, priests of Asmodeus will sometimes assume command of their temple to oversee the "establishment" phase of diabolism in the land, while Baalzebul's faithful will occupy a hidden shrine of Asmodeus in another land to begin the process again.

Baalzebul's shrines are usually filled with an overabundance of statuary and feature a heavy insect motif. Incense made from unpleasant and unsanitary materials (sometimes just offal) is burnt in their lord's honor.

History[edit]

Baalzebul was originally an archon named Triel who succumbed to the temptation of power and ambition and consequentially fell into Hell. He was recruited into the ranks of the devils by Asmodeus and quickly climbed through the ranks of the fiends, assuming control of the seventh layer to become one of the most powerful devils in Baator.[4]

Before the Reckoning of Hell, he and Mephistopheles both had three arch devils under their influence. Baalzebul was allied with Zariel, former lord of the first, Belial, lord of the fourth and Moloch, Baalzebul's former viceroy of the sixth plane. Baalzebul attacked Mephistopheles's forces and gained a quick advantage which was lost once Mephistopheles's armies regained footing. Soon Baalzebul's armies were pushed back to Maladomini, the home city of the Lord of the Flies. There, Asmodeus convinced the armies to turn on their masters. In the aftermath, Baalzebul lost the honor of having a viceroy when Moloch was replaced by the Hag Countess (who has herself since been replaced by Glasya).[4]

Apocrypha[edit]

In Dragon # 28, the article "The Politics of Hell" by Alexander von Thorn gives a different history to that detailed above, and includes statistics for Satan, Belial and Astaroth. Satan is more powerful than any other Devil, but lacks support, having been exiled from hell by Beelzebub following a revolution. Beelzebub ("Lord of the Archdevils") was himself overthrown by Asmodeus and is forever after known as Baalzebul ("Lord of the Flies," with "flies" meaning "little devils" in this context).[24]

In Legions of Hell by Chris Pramas, Beelzebub (as he's called in that source) is described as a fallen throne archon. His servants in that book include Amitiel, the Archon of Truth; Flauros, who is consulted in divinations; Meresin, who controls lightning storms; Moloch, a former angelic patron of children who now welcomes child sacrifice; Murmur, who questions souls arriving in the Seventh Circle; Nergal, the Fetid Prince; Rahbad, Lord of the Lightless Seas; and Tamiel, Angel of the Deep.

Other publishers[edit]

Baalzebul appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 19.[16]

Baalzephon[edit]

Baalzephon
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Dispater
Design details

Baalzephon (/ˈblzɨfɒn/ BAYL-zi-fon)[31] is a fictional devil in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game.

Baalzephon is one of the Dark Eight, the pit fiend generals of the Blood War. He is the former prime minister of Dispater.

Baalzephon in Greyhawk[edit]

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting, Baalzephon has strong links to the Great Kingdom and the House of Naelax. His involvement with the House of Naelax dates from around the 440s CY, when Ivenzen, the father of Overking Ivid I made contact with Baalzephon, and made a deal with him. It was he who instructed Ivenzen in the manufacture of the Malachite Throne and helped the House of Naelax attain power in exchange for expelling all demons from Aerdi lands and binding Ivenzen and his heirs and descendent souls to him for a period of 888 years.

Just prior to the Greyhawk Wars, Baalzephon masqueraded as a minor god, "Baalzy," ostensibly a deity of wealth, power and prosperity. By 578 CY, Baalzephon's new faith had become one of only two tolerated religions in the Great Kingdom under Ivid V (the other one being the worship of Hextor), and was instituted as the official state religion of the Great Kingdom.

According to the unpublished Ivid the Undying, Baalzephon also had a hand in the creation of the animus undead through the intervention of his pit fiends and their cooperation with clerics of Hextor, as well as the use of a special artifact, the Casket of Abyssal Bone created by Baalzephon himself.

Creative origins[edit]

The name Baal-zephon means "lord of the north [side]" in Hebrew.

Baftis[edit]

Baftis is the consort to Baalzebul, the arch-devil currently ruling Maladomini, the seventh layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. She shares this title with Lilith, the former consort to viceroy Moloch, another arch-devil who was demoted upon the Reckoning of Hell. Subservient and very quiet, Baftis never acts without proper authorization. Extremely afraid of Baalzebul, she never calls attention to herself and always does what her master tells her to. A quite beautiful she-devil, Baftis has a crimson body with an ivory-white, luminescent back, spiral horns, and unusual pale violet eyes. Unlike most other devils, she has no tail. She dislikes showing her back and hides it at all times with dark dresses. Her attitude is rather forbidding and uncommunicative.

Baftis's only act of faint rebellion was when Baalzebul built a city in Maladomini that was supposed to be perfect until he found a slight imperfection in the throne room. Thus, he commanded his court and the citizens to leave. Baftis, for once defied her master and refused to leave. Baalzebul cursed her and sealed her in the city, now a ghost town where no one lives but her. Baftis still holds the title of consort of the Lord of the Seventh but now has very little authority. Baalzebul has taken as second consort the strong-willed and loyal Lilith, his viceroy Moloch's former consort.

Baftis first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Baftis was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Balan[edit]

Balan
Game background
Title(s) Duke of Hell
Home plane Baator
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful evil
Portfolio n/a
Domains n/a
Superior Belial
Design details

Balan is a Duke of Hell in Phelegethos and one of Belial's loyal supporters. Before the Reckoning of Hell, Balan was an ally of Bathym, a fellow duke in the service of Belial. After that conflict, however, Bathym shifted his alliance to Fierna, while Balan continued to support Belial first and foremost, as Belial had long helped him fulfill his unspeakable desires. More than any other baatezu, Bathym is now Balan's greatest enemy; Bathym hopes to increase Fierna's control over Phlegethos and his own position with it, while Balan desires to keep Belial as the power behind the throne. For a time, they were at least civil with one another, but as Fierna continues to assert herself, it looks as if Balan and Bathym may soon come to blows. Balan considers death to be a state of absolute order, and so strives to bring all others to that state. He strives for the deaths of demons first, then women, then everyone else. Balan commands 40 companies of bearded devils. Each company consists of 333 devils. He has no mortal followers.

Balan first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Balan was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3] Balan was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #360 (October 2007) in the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[32] Balan appears as a giant, yellow-skinned man with fierce black brows and a beard which grows in tufts. He has gray hooves and a body which darkens to scarlet about his legs and his forked tail. He typically wears only a leather weapon belt and girdle, and shuns armor. He has red or blue flaming eyes visible at some distance, and a hoarse voice. He wears a badge upon his belt depicting his own head next to a bull’s head and a ram’s head, as well as the heads of those he has slain. He tends to be incautious in his fights, charging in with twin axes.

Barbas[edit]

Barbas
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Mephistopheles
Design details

Barbas is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles; serving as Mephistopheles's chamberlain. Barbas appears as a giant, bearded man with large lips and an enormous belly. He wears voluminous robes, which conceal his forked tail, hooves, and crimson skin covered with thick, oily black hair. Barbas is lazy and gross-bodied but snake-quick in battle.

Barbas first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Barbas was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Barbas was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Barbatos[edit]

Barbatos
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Baalzebul
Design details

Barbatos is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Barbatos appears as a bearded, horned man-like giant with crimson skin, black hooves, and a tail. His eyes are green, and he talks with a rich, persuasive voice. Barbatos is a vassal of Baalzebul, serving as Baalzebul's marshall.

Barbatos first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Barbatos was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Bathym[edit]

Bathym
Game background
Title(s) The Black Duke
Home plane Baator
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful evil
Portfolio n/a
Domains n/a
Superior Fierna
Design details

Bathym is a Duke of Hell in the service of Fierna, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bathym first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6]

Bathym was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3] Bathym was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #360 (October 2007) in the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[32]

Description[edit]

Bathym has black-hued eyes, black hooves, and black nails. His skin, horns and tail are a dead, fishbelly-white color. Bathym’s forked tail is short and curled like a pig’s; he is most sensitive about it and keeps it concealed. When angry, Bathym hisses like a snake when he speaks.

Bathym is known as "the Black Duke" for the color of the armor he wears. He covers his face with a full horned helm and covers his armor with a voluminous black cloak. His black spiked mace bleeds darkness.

Bathym displays prudent caution and diabolical cunning in battle, letting his mount, the terrible half-devil nightmare Fell Wind, do most of the fighting.

Relationships[edit]

Bathym is a duke of Phelegethos and a supporter of Fierna.

Before the Reckoning of Hell, Bathym was an ally of Balan, a fellow duke in the service of Belial. Disgusted by Belial's cowardice (as he saw it) after that war, Bathym shifted his alliance to Fierna, who he had long coveted from the shadows. Balan, however, remained loyal to Belial, who had long helped him satiate his unspeakable lusts. More than any other baatezu, Balan is now Bathym's greatest enemy; Bathym hopes to increase Fierna's control over Phlegethos and his own position with it, while Balan desires to keep Belial as the power behind the throne. For a time, they were at least civil with one another, but as Fierna continues to assert herself, it looks as if Balan and Bathym may soon come to blows.

Vassals[edit]

Bathym commands 30 companies of barbed devils. Each company consists of 333 devils. He has no mortal followers.

Bel[edit]

Bel
Game background
Title(s) Lord of the First
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Domains Warfare
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Bel the pit fiend, is the Arch-Devil currently in charge of Avernus, the First Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. He is nicknamed "The Pretender" by others of his kin. Bel's name, like many other arch fiends of Baator, is inspired namewise by a real life mythological figure, the Semitic god Bel. Bel sports the typical features of any pit fiend. He is a huge, square bodied creature with red, scaly skin and a gaping maw instead of a mouth. He also wears a belt made out of decapitated, still-living angel heads. His avatar appears as a burly humanoid with a jutting chin, powerful arms, and a slightly reddish complexion. His brooding scowl reveals the barely controlled rage beneath.


In first edition AD&D, the ruler of Avernus was said to be Tiamat, although this has since been retconned. Bel was first described as a pit fiend servant of Dispater in Dragon #75,[33] and the 1st edition Monster Manual II (1983).[34] He was mentioned briefly as a commander of the armies of Avernus in the Monstrous Compendium Outer Planes Appendix (1991).[35] He was mentioned in this context, described as a servant of the layer's unnamed lord, in Planes of Law (1995),[36] and given primary control over the Third Command of the Blood War in Hellbound (1996).[37] He was first identified as Avernus's ruler in Dragon #223 (November 1995), a role he retained in later appearances. That source explained that he had wrested control of the layer from the unnamed previous ruler (noted only to not be Tiamat) thousands of years ago.[38] His predecessor was first named as Zariel in Guide to Hell (1999).[10] Bel is detailed as the lord of Avernus in third edition in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002),[39] and again in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[40] The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Bel is still the lord of Avernus. However, the 5th edition Monster Manual notes Bel as a former lord of Avernus, with Zariel the current lord.

Relationships[edit]

Thousands of years ago, Bel wrested Avernus from its previous ruler, Zariel, whom he once served as her warlord. It is said she still lies bound beneath Bel's fortress as he slowly siphons power from her. Before he served Zariel, he served Dispater, commanding three companies of horned devils known as the Iron Guard. He has no support among the other archdevils, but he is held in high favor among the Dark Eight, an advantage that is not to be overlooked. He has responsibilities to the Dark Eight that Asmodeus has forced him to continue as a condition for allowing him to ascend to mastery over his layer. It is thought that Asmodeus only allowed his coup to succeed because Bel's responsibilities leading the Third Command in the Blood War meant he would have much less time for scheming than his predecessor. Bel has extensive dealings with Tiamat, who is mocked by some as Bel's scaly watchdog.

Bel has granted the Dukes of Hell Malphas, Amduscias, and Goap into the service of Tiamat. As a result, no nobles serve him personally. He is served by two horned devil fighters, Yeddikadir and Nalebranc, and the Dark Eight function as Dukes of Hell for him to some extent. These pit fiends include Baalzephon, Corin, Dagos, Furcas, Pearza, Zapan, Zaebos, and Zimmimar.

As well as commanding the armies of Avernus, Bel has primary control over the Third Command, one of the three divisions of Hell's armies commanded by Dagos of the Dark Eight. In this task, his co-generals are the ice devils Meritos and Hanariel. The Third Command is made up mostly of infantry and expendable ground troops, whose primary task is to wear down their demonic foes through attrition and superior tactics. For the most part, the soldiers of the Third Command are mindless lemures and nupperibos, but the command also includes a large number of lesser devils such as abishai, spinagons, and lower-ranked bearded devils.

Realm[edit]

Bel rules the whole of Avernus, except for the realms of the gods who dwell there such as Tiamat, Bargrivyek, and Kurtulmak. However, as preoccupied as he is with the Blood War, much of Avernus remains wild, and exiled nobles known as the Rabble of Devilkin roam its blasted and scarred wastes with little supervision.

His center of power is the Bronze Citadel, an ever-expanding fortress that serves as Hell's principal bulwark against demonic invasion. It currently consists of 14 concentric rings sprawling across 600 square miles (1,600 km2) of territory, pressing against the Stigmaris Mountains. Within the complex, each of the Dark Eight maintain households for when they need to consult with Bel.

History[edit]

Bel originally served as a duke in the service of Dispater. He was given command over the armies of Avernus after enacting a devastating maneuver in the Blood War that became known as the Four-Cross, in which he ostensibly betrayed the devils to join the side of the demons, then rejoined the diabolic side of the war only to betray them a second time, then fought with the demons for a year and a day before finally enacting a devastating betrayal that crippled the forces of the Abyss for a decade.

Bel took rulership of Avernus some time following the Reckoning of Hell, after he betrayed his mistress, Zariel, the former Duchess of Avernus about whom virtually nothing is known. Bel is a cruel, violent and very blunt warlord whose main concern is the Blood War, an unending conflict between the chaotic evil tanar'ris from the Abyss and the lawful evil baatezu of Baator. As Avernus is actually the battlefield upon which the daily fighting occurs, Bel is in charge of keeping the demons at bay and keeping safe the harvesting of the evil souls that come to the Nine Hells. This makes him the archdevil who most often deals directly with mortals and non-baatezu. Although Bel delights in corrupting souls as much as others of his kind do, he is very realistic and he knows he can at best contain the invaders but not utterly destroy them, as they fairly outnumber his own armies. Thus, any mortal that offers him to lend a hand in the Blood War is welcome every now and then, and might be rewarded with the right to go further in the Nine Hells or simply to have his/her life spared. Bel is also the Lord who most often deals with the outcast dukes of Baator, a group of demoted devils that lurk in Avernus and are continually scheming to regain their lost status.

Bel actually gets his power from removing and consuming pieces of flesh from Zariel herself who is currently imprisoned and continually tortured in the basement of the Bronze Citadel where the Lord of the First has his headquarters. This fact got him nicknamed "The Pretender" by the other Arch-Lords who greatly despise him. However, Bel is very appreciated by the Overlord of Baator, Asmodeus, and the Dark Eight, for his skills in battle and his efficiency in the Blood War, as well as his spying abilities.

Other media[edit]

The Blood War miniature set featured a Pit Fiend as the most powerful creature in the Lawful Evil faction, if not the most powerful creature of the set. It came with an Epic stat card of 310 points. The card came with a very high armor class stat, along with spell resistance, a general DR, high attack power and a very powerful "meteor swarm" 9th level spell.

Bele[edit]

Bele
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Mephistopheles
Design details

Bele is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bele first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bele was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bele appears as a tall, handsome, hollow-eyed man with ivory skin, a curling beard and pencil-thin mustache, a low, nasal voice, tiny horns, and long black robes. Beneath the robes are concealed a short forked tail, a crimson-skinned lower torso, and a belt bearing Bele's black rod of office and a dagger of venom. When Bele disrobes, his leathery wings can spread to a surprisingly large (20-foot) wingspan.

Relationships[edit]

Bele is a vassal of Mephistopheles, serving as Mephistopheles's justiciar.

Belial[edit]

Belial
Game background
Title(s) Lord of the Fourth, Lord of Pain and Sufferings
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Domains Pain, Hurt, Lust
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Belial (/b ˈl ʌl/ bee-LY-ul[7] or /ˈbliəl/ BEE-lee-əl)[41] is an Arch-Devil of Hell (commonly Baator in 2nd edition versions of the game), lord of the Fourth Hell, Phlegethos. He retained his rule after the Reckoning of Hell, though he now shares this responsibility with his daughter Fierna who serves as his mouthpiece (and possible lover). He has designs on the Fifth and Sixth levels of Hell. His symbols are a two-pronged ranseur and a handsome male face with dark features and small horns. A more elaborate symbol of Belial involves red, glowing eyes over a two-pronged ranseur, surrounded by a red tail with a wicked barb.

Creative origins[edit]

Belial, whose name has been translated to mean "worthlessness," is based on the demon from Christian and Jewish apocrypha of the same name.

Publication history[edit]

Belial was first detailed in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983).[42] He also appeared in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[43] Belial's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[44]

Belial did not initially appear in 2nd edition, and in the Planescape line the lord of Phlegethos was instead Fierna. Eventually, it was revealed that Belial and Fierna now shared rulership of Phlegethos, in Guide to Hell (1999).[10]

In third edition, Belial appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[45] Belial was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Belial and Fierna are still the lords of Phlegethos.[30]

Description[edit]

Belial is said to have both the most handsome and diabolic appearance of all the devils. He is a tall, dark humanioid with small horns on his head, dresses always in regal finery and carries a ranseur. He is handsome and sexual, with large slanted eyes that smolder red.

Relationships[edit]

Belial is the father of Fierna, though his consort Naome. He has an alliance with Telchur, Oerth's god of winter, as is said that he aided Telchur in Vatun's imprisonment. Belial has a secret alliance lasting centuries with Baalzebul, Lord of the Seventh Hell. Before the Reckoning, he was also allied with Moloch and Zariel. Two of the original members of the Dark Eight, Zaebos and Zapan, originally worked for him before taking on their present positions. He is a rival of Levistus, and was a rival of the Hag Countess before her demise. Since the ascension of Glasya, he has chosen a "wait and see" approach.

The bulk of Belial's scheming currently involves trying to keep tabs on his daughter without provoking her to straying further from his control. He is growing concerned that he is losing his grip on his power. Gazra is jealous and hateful toward Belial, but keeps those feelings well hidden.

Vassals[edit]

The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Belial on Phlegethos. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Balan - 40 companies of barbazu (DR75)
  • Bathym - 30 companies of hamatula (DR75)
  • Chamo - Legate (DR75)
  • Gaziel - 11 companies of osyluths (DR75)
  • Naome - Consort of Belial (DR75)
  • Zaebos, pit fiend - Lieutenant, one of the Dark Eight
  • Zapan, pit fiend - 4 companies of cornugons, one of the Dark Eight

Realm and clergy[edit]

Belial, currently the power behind the throne in Phlegethos, rules from his Hall of One Thousand Sighs and Screams within Fierna's tower of crystalline stone. Belial teaches his followers to revel in the pleasures and pains of the flesh. He delights in manipulating mortals. He also enjoys killing, craving the sensation of hot blood splashing against his body. That said, he is not a fool, and knows when to cut and run. Members of Belial's small cult devote themselves to trickery, seduction, domination, and secrets. They are generally more interested in personal than political corruption. Clerics of Belial sport thin, well-groomed beards (if male), dress in red and black, and wield the ranseur. Male clerics predominate. Temples to Belial feature circular altars and black and red candles, in elegant towers and halls. The decor is both understated and tasteful.

Apocrypha[edit]

In "The Politics of Hell" in Dragon #28, Belial was originally the devil in charge of politicians, the supreme commander of Hell's armies, and Satan's personal lieutenant, gaining the animosity of the other devils and the esteem of Satan when he acted to discipline the others for minor acts of rebellion. As a result, Belial was the only archdevil who remained on the side of Satan after Baalzebul's coup, and Belial became exiled along with his former master. In this version of the story (published years before Belial was officially introduced to the game in the Monster Manual II), Belial has remained exiled ever since. However, the armies of Hell have remained loyal to him, and Belial retained his influence over politicians and bureaucrats for some time, having kept his former contacts. He was described in that article as a beautiful angelic being riding a chariot of fire.[24]

In Legions of Hell by Chris Pramas, Belial was a fallen celestial (a former virtue, equivalent to a deva) like Baalzebul, thus explaining their natural alliance, and like the latter devil was treated as an upstart by Dispater and Mephistopheles, who were "born of the baatezu race." It says "Only Asmodeus is a better liar than Belial." His servants in that book include Ariel, a winged warrior with the head of a lion who oversees the tortures of the Fourth Hell; Antaia, the Witch Queen; Balan, Master of the Infernal Hunt; and Naamah, Contessa of Duplicity.[46]

Belial in other media[edit]

In Neverwinter Nights, a demon known as Belial, Lord of Fire makes an appearance. Belial appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 13.[16]

Bensozia[edit]

Bensozia
Game information
Homeland Nine Hells
Gender Female
Race Devil (Baatezu)
Alignment LE
Title Queen of Hell
Setting Generic D&D

Bensozia is a fictional devil for the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. She is the consort of Asmodeus, ruler of Baator. She is also referred to as the Queen of Hell.[1][47]


Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st edition (1977-1988)[edit]

Bensozia's name first appears in a list in "New denizens of devildom: A partial preview of Monster Manual II" in Dragon #75 (1983).[19] As the article's title suggests, this list of unique devils also appears in Monster Manual II (1983).[48]

The following issue of Dragon describes her in more detail, in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II".[1]

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd edition (1989-1999)[edit]

Her ultimate fate was first revealed in the sourcebook Guide to Hell (1999).[10]

Dungeons & Dragons 3rd edition (2000-2007)[edit]

She was briefly mentioned in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Dungeons & Dragons 4th edition (2008-)[edit]

Bensozia is presented in Dungeon #197 (2011) as a vengeful and bitter concubine intent on betraying Asmodeus.[47]

Physical description[edit]

Bensozia is described in Dragon #76 as a tall statuesque devil with a human-like appearance. She has long white hair, large glistening black eyes, scarlet skin, large brown hooves, and a forked tail. She bears a brass scepter and wears loose black robes with a scarlet silk lining within, and a diadem of beaten gold set with large rubies.[1]

Fictional character biography[edit]

Bensozia, the Queen of Hell, is first detailed for first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons in Dragon #76, where she is described as the consort of Asmodeus, and his staunch supporter. She is described as "personally the most powerful of the consorts", but it is noted that "her influence is entirely linked with that of Asmodeus" and that she only speaks by the leave of Asmodeus. The articles states that Bensozia seems happy in her position, even though she is not always physically present with Asmodeus, and it also states that her natural manner is coldly polite and haughty, seldom revealing her true feelings.[1]

Bensozia has always been described as the chief consort of Asmodeus, but her motivations differ between appearances and game editions. Her narrative role is primarily to serve as a source of conflict between the warring lords of Baator. She is an object of physical jealousy and is invariably murdered under tragic circumstances.

The second edition sourcebook Guide to Hell relates the story of how, in the long ago past, Levistus, the ruler of the 5th layer of Hell, ambushed Bensozia while she traveled through Stygia, slew her guards and then tried to turn her against Asmodeus. When she rebuffed Levistus, he grew angry and slew her. Asmodeus becomes enraged and as punishment he traps Levistus alive inside a block of ice.[10]

The third edition Dungeons & Dragons manual Book of Vile Darkness changes the story a little; in this version, Levistus approaches Bensozia and invited to betray her husband Asmodeus. She refuses and Levistus slays her.[49] According to Fiendish Codex II, Levistus attempted to ravish Bensozia, but he slew her when she would not submit to him. Levistus' treachery is a continual source of conflict between him, Asmodeus, and Glasya.[4]

With the 4th edition reimagining of Dungeons & Dragons continuity, Bensozia's role and backstory were changed, and the tone of her narrative shifted. In this continuity, she is the corrupted exarch of He Who Was, the benign deity against whom Asmodeus rebelled. Whereas in previous continuity she was a loyal and willing consort, in 4th edition Bensozia becomes Asmodeus' lover only unwillingly. She harbors a bitter resentment against him and plots willingly to undermine and overthrow him. She carries on an affair with Levistus and is eventually murdered by a jealous Glasya.

Bifrons[edit]

Bifrons
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Mephistopheles
Design details

Bifrons is a Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bifrons first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bifrons was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bifrons appears as a wingless, gray-skinned and heavily muscled devil with a humanoid torso, and a snake-like lower body from the hip down, with no legs. He has stubby horns on his brow, and totally white, slanted eyes, large nostrils and mouth, and a deep, rumbling voice.

Relationships[edit]

Bifrons is a vassal of Mephistopheles, commanding 26 companies of gelugons (ice devils).

Bileth[edit]

Bileth
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Moloch
Design details

Bileth is a Duke of Hell, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bileth first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bileth was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2]

Bileth was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bileth appears as a large man clad in gilded coat of plate. He uses weapons only in a pinch, preferring to fight with his fists backed up by his massive strength. He is bearded, crimson-skinned, and has horns and hooves. He is tailless, but has large black bat-like leathery wings. He can also breathe fire, but he will do this only if angered or hard-pressed.

Relationships[edit]

Bileth was originally a vassal of Moloch by appointment from Baalzebul, serving as Moloch's tribune. He served the Hag Countess when she overthrew Moloch, but when Glasya took over Malbolge, Bileth was recalled to Baalzebul's service.

Buer[edit]

Buer
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Buer is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Buer first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Buer was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Physically, Buer resembles a bariaur with gleaming silver skin and white hair. His eyes, horns, and hooves are scarlet. From his hips grow six 10' long prehensile tentacles, dripping with acidic bile.

Relationships[edit]

Buer is a vassal of Asmodeus, commanding 15 companies of pit fiends.

Bune[edit]

Bune
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Bune is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bune first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Bune was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Bune generally resembles a cornugon in appearance, but his scaled body is green in hue (coppery on the belly and loins), and his talons are silvery in color. Bune's head, however, is human—with dog-like furry ears and a great griffon-like beak. His voice is high-pitched and lilting, although he will screech if he becomes infuriated, and he is an excellent mimic of other beings.

Relationships[edit]

Bune is a vassal of Asmodeus, commanding 30 companies of cornugons (horned devils).

Chamo[edit]

Chamo
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Belial
Design details

Chamo is a Duke of Hell in the service of Belial, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Chamo first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6]

Chamo was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2]

Chamo was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Chamo appears as a white-haired, middle-aged man with big brown eyes. He has upward-pointing horns, black hooves, a forked tail, and black bat-like wings. His skin is scarlet, darkening to blue on his long-nailed hands. He usually wears loose black robes with a high stand-up collar. Chamo is a vassal of Belial, acting as Belial's legate.

Dispater[edit]

Dispater
Game background
Title(s) Lord of the Second
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Dispater is an Arch-Devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), and the Lord of the Iron City of Dis. Dispater was one of the few arch-devils that retained his position after the Reckoning of Hell. Dispater is lord of Dis, the Second Plane of Hell. His symbol is a fortress embossed on a reinforced metal shield.

Dispater stands at seven feet tall, is evilly handsome and looks human except for his small horns, tail, and cloven left hoof. Dispater is incredibly cautious to the point of paranoia. He always has at least nine different back up plans for any situation. He is also always polite and calm even in very troubling and stressful situations. Dispater's iron tower is itself a powerful magic item which makes Dispater almost impossible to kill as long as he remains inside it. Dispater never leaves his tower unless forced, most notably for the yearly council with Asmodeus which all the Archdevils are required to attend.

Dispater first appears in the first edition Monster Manual (1977).[12] Dispater's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Dispater did not initially appear in 2nd edition, but he did feature prominently in the Planescape line, particularly in the adventure Fires of Dis (1995).[50] His history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[28] In third edition, Dispater appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[29] Dispater was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Dispater is still the lord of Dis.[30]

Relationships[edit]

Dispater is the sworn enemy of Baalzebul and is allied with Mephistopheles and as such most of his plans focus on the destruction of Baalzebul. His consort is Lilis.

The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Dispater. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Alocer - 36 companies of erinyes (DR75).
  • Arioch - Avenger (DR75).
  • Biffant - Provost (DR75).
  • Bitru - 70 companies of erinyes (DR 75).
  • Lilis - Consort to Dispater (DR75).
  • Merodach - 21 companies of hamatula (DR75).
  • Talos the Triple Iron Golem - Ancient iron golem who serves Lord Dispater.
  • Titivilus - Messenger of Dispater, Nuncio (MM2).
  • Ustyhrin-Ja - Pleasure Devil Desciple who serves her master with frevor and leads his warrior harem.
  • Zaggutch - Pit fiend lieutenant (FoD).

The following beings once served in Dispater's court:

  • Baalzephon - Before the Reckoning of Hell, this pit fiend served Dispater as Prime Minister.
  • Bel - Before entering the service of Zariel on Avernus, Bel commanded three companies of horned devils known as the Iron Guard.

Realm[edit]

Dispater rules Dis, the Second Layer of Hell, from the Iron City of Dis.


Worshippers[edit]

Dispater's cult appeals to those who value stability as much as cruelty. They tend to build impregnable fortresses, carefully reviewing defensive protocol and possible escape plans. They include many hobgoblins, goblins, and similar humanoids.

Clergy[edit]

Clerics of Dispater wear gray clothing and conceal their faces behind iron masks. They wield heavy maces and are usually heavily armored. Disciples of Dispater verge on paranoia and are distrustful of all around them.

History[edit]

According to Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells, when Asmodeus created Baator, he, Mephistopheles, and Dispater were the first of the baatezu to set foot on the plane. Dispater has controlled Dis ever since.[4]

Thousands of years ago, Dispater helped broker the pact between Tiamat's red dragon consort Ephelomon and Gith, first leader of the githyanki. In return, he claimed Gith's soul, which he has kept imprisoned in his iron city ever since.

In the Reckoning, Dispater's legendary tower was the first to be attacked and was laid siege to by Zariel. However, Mammon managed to help Dispater beat the besieging army back and then they both invaded Maladomini to attack Baalzebul.

After the Reckoning, Dispater retained his position as ruler of Dis. He is still an ally of Mephistopheles and he, Mephistopheles, Baalzebul, and Belial form the only two real alliances in Hell.

In the adventure Fires of Dis, Dispater was behind a plot to ruin a noble crusading paladin and prevent the ascension of the gate-town of Fortitude.[50]

Other publishers[edit]

Dispater appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 9.[16]

Erac's Cousin[edit]

Erac's Cousin
Game information
Homeland Unknown
Gender Male
Race Human
Class Fighter/ wizard
Alignment Lawful Evil
Setting World of Greyhawk

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the man known as Erac's Cousin is a mysterious figure who has not revealed his real name. He is also called simply the Unnamed.

Creative origins[edit]

Gary Gygax's son Ernie originally had a character he called "Erac", in addition to other well-known characters Serten and Tenser. Later, he created a wizard who, due to a personal issue as part of his backstory, refused to reveal his name, simply referring to himself as "Erac's Cousin". Gary Gygax knew that Ernie liked the Barsoom stories of Edgar Rice Burroughs, and at one point, whisked Erac's Cousin off to a very Barsoom-like Mars,[51] where the inhabitants refused to let the wizard use magic. Erac's Cousin was forced to become a fighter instead, and learned to fight proficiently with two weapons simultaneously. Eventually he was able to teleport back to Oerth, but when he acquired two vorpal blades, co-Dungeon Masters Rob Kuntz and Gary Gygax decided he had become too powerful,[51] and lured him into a demon's clutches. The demon took him to an alternative plane that drained the magic from the vorpal blades, destroying them.

The profile of Erac's Cousin was published in TSR's Rogues' Gallery in 1980,[52] and Gary Gygax mentioned Erac's Cousin in several articles in Dragon magazine in 1980 and 1981.[53][54]

When Gary Gygax was forced out of TSR in 1985, the rights to most characters used in his stories and columns, including Erac's Cousin, remained with TSR, and Erac's Cousin was mentioned in further material by both TSR and Wizards of the Coast.

Description[edit]

Erac's Cousin was a mage who was able to wield swords with great proficiency. He was seldom seen without a red-eyed rat on his shoulder, his imp familiar. He commanded an army including 50 medium cavalry, 50 light cavalry, 50 light horse archers, 100 heavy infantry regulars, 100 heavy archer regulars, and 100 pole armed infantry regulars. Many of his troops were rumored to be evil humanoids.

The Unnamed may have been reborn as a greater devil.

History[edit]

Erac's Cousin was once a lawful good human magic-user. He gave up being a spellcaster to become a fighter with a penchant for wielding a pair of vorpal swords.

In one adventure, Erac's Cousin and his cleric companion Ayelerach are purported to have stumbled upon the stone prison of the demon prince Fraz-Urb'luu in the dungeons below Castle Greyhawk. The Prince of Deception, with his honeyed words, tricked the pair into reading from a scroll that released the demon from his prison. The two hapless adventurers were then whisked away by Fraz-Urb'luu to his layer on the Abyss to become his slaves, and the vorpal swords were destroyed. Erac's Cousin and Ayelerach were eventually able to return to the Material Plane, but describe the Abyssal realm they visited as depressing and sickening, due to its totally flat and featureless terrain, and ability to drain the magic out of any item.

Upon his escape from the Abyss, an unknown form of insanity overtook Erac's Cousin and he slew all of his friends to steal their possessions, forsaking his former deity who he blamed for not saving him from the demon prince. Erac's Cousin, now thoroughly evil, made a pact with the archdevil Baalzebul. As a reward for the souls of those he slew, Baalzebul agreed to make Erac's Cousin into a major devil upon his death, despite Erac's Cousin's fear of dying.

There is speculation[55] that Erac's Cousin may have helped form the Horned Society. Many of the Hierarchs were killed by Iuz's vengeance, but one was able to return. This being, known only as the "Unnameable Hierarch" was reborn as a greater devil thanks to a pact with the archfiend Baalzebul.

Fierna[edit]

Fierna
Game background
Title(s) Lady of the Fourth
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Lady Fierna is the ruler of the Fourth Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. She is the daughter of arch-Duke Belial and his late consort Naome, and currently shares the rulership with her father. Her unholy symbol, like that of Belial, involves red, glowing eyes over a two-pronged ranseur, surrounded by a red tail with a wicked barb.

Publication history[edit]

Fierna was first identified as the ruler of Phlegethos in Dragon #223 (November 1995).[56] Her history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[10]

In third edition, Fierna appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[45] Fierna was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Fierna is described as a human-like, young, and incredibly beautiful she-devil sporting two small horns, a pointed tail and long red nails. She has a very sexual personality and wears very little clothing.

History[edit]

Fierna was set up for rulership as a result of the Reckoning of Hell. Belial, advised by Naome, stepped down and gave the throne of Phlegethos to his daughter in order for him to retain his position. Belial would nevertheless remain in command, acting from the sidelines and using his daughter as his puppet and mouthpiece.

Fierna, who wasn't into politics in the first place, accepted this treatment and decided at first to merely enjoy what her brand new status was granting her. She used to spend most of her time in her palace, having sex and fun in her eternally blazing pit of lust and leaving the concern of governing and managing to her parents and her consort, the pit fiend Gazra. She would only come out to do her father's commands and to attend the yearly meeting of the arch-Lords in Nessus.

Fierna changed her mind about ruling Phlegethos recently, when she developed a friendship with Glasya, Asmodeus's daughter who is now in command of Malbolge, the Sixth plane. Fierna looked up to her and began to understand the true meaning of rulership. Thus, she has become a little more serious about her actual job. Belial, who won't relinquish his power, dislikes having his daughter discussing his decisions and acts to remind her who's making the rules.

Gossip says that Belial and his daughter are having an incestuous relationship. This rumor grew stronger after Naome's death, even though Fierna has a consort of her own. The loyalties of Belial and Fierna's vassals tend to sway between the two according to the favors granted or to their own convictions about the ability of the Lords of Phlegethos.

4th edition[edit]

The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Fierna and Belial are still the lords of Phlegethos.

Relationships[edit]

Fierana is the daughter of Belial and Naome. As a Lord of the Nine, she is a subject of Asmodeus. She has developed a friendship with the daughter of Asmodeus, Glasya princess of Hell, Duke of the Sixth, due to their mutual loss of a mother. This bothers Belial as Glasya's influence is starting to make Fierana more independent.

Vassals[edit]

Fierna has the same vassals as her father, in addition to her consort.

Worshippers[edit]

Fierna's cult is still young, having developed only in the past few years since the ascension of Glasya, and as such as not yet settled on a definitive agenda. Her followers are an extremely varied group of outcasts, exiles, and malcontents. Fierna's clergy favor the scimitar. Thus far, Fierna's few temples have been improvised from what her followers already have available.

Gaziel[edit]

Gaziel
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Belial
Design details

Gaziel is a Duke of Hell in the service of Belial, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Gaziel has a white, skull-like head with hollow eye sockets and small, curling pink horns, so that from a distance he resembles an osyluth. He has a brown to blood-red hued humanoid body, a red forked tail, and black hooves. His tongue is long, slim, purple-red, and forked. His wrists and knees have bulbous, bony joints, and his elbows have hooked spurs. Gaziel is a vassal of Belial, who leads 21 companies of osyluths (bone devils).

Gaziel first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Gaziel was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Gazra[edit]

Gazra
Game background
Power level Pit fiend
Alignment Lawful Evil
Design details

Gazra the pit fiend is a general and commander of the hamatulas. Gazra is the consort of Fierna. Gazra is jealous and hateful toward Belial, but keeps those feelings well hidden. Levistus is trying to sway Gazra into his influence; it may be only a matter of time before he succeeds, but for the time being Gazra remains loyal to Fierna. Gazra and the archomental Ogrémoch are involved in a conspiracy involving a mysterious portal of some sort. Gazra dwells in a palace of crystal in the city of Abriymoch, on the layer of Phlegethos in Baator.

Gazra was first mentioned in the Monstrous Compendium Outer Planes Appendix (1991).[35] He was also mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997),[57] and Guide to Hell (1999).[58]

Gazra was described in third edition in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002),[45] and in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[59]

Glasya[edit]

Glasya
Game background
Title(s) Lord of the Sixth
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Glasya is a powerful devil and a Princess of Hell (Baator in 2nd edition version of the game). She is noted to be one of the most powerful and influential of the female devils. Her symbol is a copper scourge.

Creative origins[edit]

Like many of the archfiends in the game, Glasya, at least namewise, has her origins in real world myths. Her name seems to be a derivation of Glasya-Labolas, which is another name for the fiend known as Caarcrinolaas. The fact that she is the Overlord of Hell's daughter is a complete original concept written by Gary Gygax.

Publishing history[edit]

Glasya made her first appearance in Dragon #75, in an article that served as a preview of the then upcoming first edition Monster Manual II.[42] She appeared in the Monster Manual II later that same year in 1983.[43]

In the second edition of the game, Glasya appeared in the supplement Guide to Hell, written by Chris Pramas. In this sourcebook, she is no longer the consort to Mammon but the leader of the erinyes devils.[10]

Glasya made her 3rd edition Dungeons & Dragons debut in the sourcebook Book of Vile Darkness.[49] She was revealed as the new lord of Malbolge in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Glasya is still the lord of Malbolge. Additional information relating to her has been released in Dragon magazine, The Plane Above: Secrets of the Astral Sea, and Demonomicon, the latter of which relates that she was an active participant - and early ally and later foe of Graz'zt - in the Blood War of the new default setting.

Description[edit]

Glasya is described as being incredibly beautiful. She has copper-colored skin and dark red or black hair. She appears human except that she has bat-like wings, horns, and a forked tail.

Relationships[edit]

Glasya is the daughter of the Overlord of the Hells, Asmodeus, and his deceased queen, Bensozia. She is also the former consort of Mammon, Lord of the Third.

Glasya has become fast friends with Fierna, the daughter of Belial, and Glasya's influence has caused Fierna to grow increasingly independent from her father. Belial is displeased with this, but unable to act against Glasya due to his fear of Asmodeus.

Vassals[edit]

Glasya favors paeliryons and erinyes as her servants but has still to build a real court.

The only unique devils known to serve her are Tartach, Baalzebul's former legate who left the court of his master due to his opinions on the Slug Lord's policies, and Beleth, the Prince of Imps.

Realm[edit]

Glasya rules Malbolge, the sixth layer of Hell. Her fortress there, Ossiea, was created from the grotesquely enlarged and distorted skull of the Hag Countess. It is a white, domelike structure, five stories in height, whose eye sockets have been filled with windows made from blood-red glass. A windpipe-like tunnel leads downwards to the subterranean kitchens and servant's quarters'. The pink flesh of the walls still expands and contracts as if an enormous creature is still breathing.

The ten fingers of the Hag Countess still rise from the ground to make enormous pillars. One finger has been hollowed out to make a tower designed for torture, with each floor holding more extreme torture. The top floor is reserved for the Nightmare ridden by the Hag Countess, which pretended to accept Glasya as its mistress only to throw her in a lake of acid. Glasya is currently hollowing a second finger, but hasn't revealed yet what it will be used for.

Worshippers[edit]

Glasya's worshippers cluster in areas of political unrest, where a small push might turn the entire realm to the ethos of lawful evil. She is also interested in realms that uphold traditional gender roles, teaching the wives and daughters of powerful men how to become the powers behind their thrones. Her clerics' favored weapon is the scourge.

Temples[edit]

Glasya favors brothels and bordellos as fronts for her temples.

History[edit]

Chief Consort[edit]

Glasya was the chief consort of Mammon (out of his harem of nine), an archdevil of avarice who rules the third layer of Hell known as Minauros. The other consorts would never try anything against her, due to her status as Asmodeus's daughter.

In first edition supplements, Glasya was very influential but not very powerful in combat and thus preferred to stay on the sidelines when it came to battle. However, she was no easy mark. She has never been in good terms with her father and would often disrespect him at any occasion. On the other hand, she liked her mother very much and would always root for her.

The Reckoning[edit]

After the Reckoning of Hell thousands of years ago, Asmodeus ended the relationship between Mammon and his daughter by ordering her to come back to Nessus. There, she served her father as mistress of the erinyes, a position she hated.

Talakara[edit]

Around 120 years ago, a human wizard named Talakara devoted herself to Glasya, and Glasya rewarded her with the circlet containing the soul of the ancient skeleton warrior Agrovale. With the combination of her increasingly powerful magic and Agrovale's might, Talakara soon conquered an isolated mountain kingdom called Pandar.

Lord of the Sixth[edit]

As of Fiendish Codex II, Glasya is now the Lord of the Sixth Layer of Hell, having taken that position from Malagarde the Hag Countess.[4] Powered up by the life essence of late arch-Duke Geryon, the Princess of Hell is now much more set for war purposes and even more forceful. She also settled her differences with her father, at least for the moment.

She currently seeks revenge upon Levistus, the ruler of neighboring Stygia. Depending on the source, she either hates him for having dared to murder her beloved mother, or for betraying her affections. Whatever the reason for her hatred, she's constantly spying on him so that she can get evidence of major transgression of Baator's rules. If she can provide that, Asmodeus will grant her the right (and his benediction) to utterly destroy Levistus.

Hag Countess[edit]

Hag Countess
Game background
Title(s) Former Lord of the Sixth
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the Hag Countess, also known as Malagard, is the former ruler of Malbolge, the Sixth Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. Her name is spelled Malagarde in Fiendish Codex II[4] and Lamagard in Defenders of the Faith.[60]

Publication history[edit]

The Hag Countess was first identified as the ruler of Malbolge in Dragon #223 (November 1995).[56] Her history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[10]

In third edition, The Hag Countess appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[45] The death of the Hag Countess was revealed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

The Hag Countess was a gruesome night hag. Her bruise-coloured skin, covered in pimples and varicose veins, constantly seeped with foul blood. Her horrid, gaunt face sported a nearly toothless mouth that smelled of carrion. She also has two large black feathery wings. Despite her decrepit form, the Hag Countess was actually very powerful.[45]

History in the Dungeons & Dragons game[edit]

Ascent in Hell[edit]

The Hag Countess was an exception among the Dukes of Hell. She was no devil but an unusually powerful night hag from Hades, the neutral evil plane of the Dungeons & Dragons cosmogony. Thus, her original alignment was also different from any other devil residing in Hell.[45]

Later, Malagard became the leman of Moloch, Baalzebul's former viceroy who ruled Malbolge at that time. She wasn't his actual consort (Lilith bore that title)[4]:65 but she was highly regarded as his personal adviser and lover.[45]

The Reckoning[edit]

The Reckoning of Hell occurred thousands of years ago.[56]:14 This was a rebellion against Asmodeus by the other Lords of the Nine Hells. The Hag Countess encouraged her lover Moloch to join Baalzebul's alliance, telling him he could become the new King of Hell. Unbeknownst to him, Malagard was secretly in communication with Geryon, and she arranged for Moloch's armies to betray him at the war's climax. Malagard betrayed Moloch again at the war's communication by advising Moloch to remain defiant in the face of utter defeat; for this, Moloch was punished with exile, and Malagard was given his throne.[10]:43 Once in charge, the Hag let in annises, night hags, green hags, and other neutral evil creatures into the Nine Hells, much to the other arch-lords' annoyance.[45]

After thousands of years of rule, the Hag Countess was deposed by Glasya, Asmodeus's daughter. As of Fiendish Codex II, without warning one day Malboge was consumed by tremors and earthquakes. As she fell to the ground, the Hag Countess's body was suddenly seized by the layer itself and held fast. As she screamed in agony, her body suddenly swelled enormously and split open to radically change the nature of the entire layer of Malbolge. Thus, the sixth plane of Baator is in fact nothing else than the Hag Countess's innards and bones. The Countess is technically dead, though her life essence still remains on Malbolge, and night hags, paeliryon devils, kalabon devils, and hell lice continually spawn from the enormous tumors in her changed flesh.[4]:60 Although this suited the plans of Asmodeus and Glasya perfectly, it is unknown if the death of the Hag Countess was simply a bizarre death, the layer rebelling against a non-lawful ruler, or the direct work of Asmodeus himself.

The rumored reason why Asmodeus placed her in control of Malbolge is that he wanted to stop bickering with his daughter and finally grant her the place she deserved: being an arch-Duchess. However, in order to do so, they had to come to an understanding. There were several steps to this process: first, Asmodeus placed Levistus in charge of Stygia to throw the other Lords of Hell into confusion and keep their attention focused on the fifth layer and the sudden shifting of alliances that resulted. At the same time, he deposed Moloch for his treason during the Reckoning and placed the Hag Countess on the throne supposedly as somebody who had remained loyal to him. Then, as the other arch-lords struggled to understand his actions with Levistus and paid less attention to her and her dubious ascension, Asmodeus and Glasya were able to parley in peace. Once they had a deal, Malagard was no use to them anymore and they quickly disposed of her.[4]:55

4th edition[edit]

In 4th edition, her death is said to be the result of a disastrous attempt to turn herself into a God. After she died, Glasya launched a surprise attack and seized control for herself, and her father later confirmed her title.

Vassals[edit]

Before being deposed, the following beings served the Hag Countess, some of them being former servants to Moloch:

  • Axacrusis, a paeliryon devil, her chancellor. For angrily questioning Glasya's claim to Malbolge, Glaysa punished him by commanding it to disembowel itself, then tortured it by commanding her retinue of imps to eternally feast on its entrails.[4]:61
  • Beleth, Prince of Imps.[61]
  • Bloodcurdle - A powerful cauchemar nightmare who serves as his mistress' steed and personal confidante. Is also being tortured at Glaysa's command for having thrown her into a lake of acid.
  • Coven of night hags of maximum power.[45]

Apocrypha[edit]

According to 3rd party material produced by Green Ronin, the Hag Countess and Lilith are one and the same, a unique being who has changed her name through the ages.

In The Unholy Warrior's Handbook by Robert J. Schwalb, "Lilith" is also known as the Hag. Her servants are listed as Lel, Marquise of the Night, a tribune, and a few generals.[62]

The Book of the Righteous by Aaron Loeb provides a creation myth for this version of the Hag. In this version, she was created from one of the div, beings born of fire at the beginning of time. The text calls her "mother of beasts" and states that countless monstrous races, including giants, trolls, and goblins, sprang from her womb.[63]

Critical reception[edit]

"Wyrdmaster," in a review for the Book of Vile Darkness,[64] criticized the inclusion of game statistics for characters of the Hag Countess's power level. "Madpoet," at 3rdedition.org, said that chapter was "the most useless section." [65] Ricardo Lopez, Creator of the Empyrean d20 setting stated, "The Hag Countess was one of my favorite Arch-Lords, but unfortunately, the power design of her character was inaccurate to the character bio and background of such an esteemed NPC."

Hutijin[edit]

Hutijin
Game background
Title(s) Duke of Hell
Home plane Baator
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful evil
Domains n/a
Superior Mephistopheles
Design details

Hutijin is a powerful Duke of Hell in the service of Mephistopheles, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Hutijin was first detailed in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983).[42] He also appeared in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[43]

Hutijin was briefly described in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] Hutijin was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[5]

Description[edit]

Hutijin closely resembles a pit fiend, but he is actually a greater, higher-ranking being. His head is larger than a pit fiend's proportionately, and his wings are smaller. His hide is a deep rust-red hue, and bathed in crackling lightning and electricity. He carries a writhing trident.

Relationships[edit]

Hutijin is famous for his loyalty to his master, whom Hutijin regards as nearly divine and obviously the rightful master of the entire plane. Many rival archdevils have tried to lure him away from his lord, but to no avail. Mephistopheles, for his part, has never abused Hutijin's trust, in part because getting on the bad side of Hutijin and his pit fiends might spell Mephistopheles's doom.

Vassals[edit]

Hutijin is a baatezu noble in the service of Mephistopheles. He commands two companies of pit fiends in his lord's service. These pit fiends are the aristocracy of Cania, and Hutijin is one of the greatest of the dukes of the Nine Hells. Unlike most diabolic companies, those under Hutijin do not follow the normal system of ranks. Instead, each pit fiend in one of Hutijin's companies is considered an equal of all the others. There are only 33 pit fiends in each company, a tenth the size of a typical company of devils.

Worshipers[edit]

Hutijin is little-known among mortals because he profoundly hates them. Even before his rise (or fall) to his current station, he hunted mortals and tortured them for months before allowing them to expire. For this reason, he does not seek a mortal cult or bother to give them any information about him which they might use as warning.

Other publishers[edit]

Hutijin appeared under the "devil" heading in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[66]

Levistus[edit]

Levistus
Game background
Title(s) Lord of the Fifth
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Levistus is the arch-devil currently ruling Stygia, the Fifth layer of the Nine Hells of Baator. His unholy symbol is a sword thrust through a block of ice, or a cauldron with chunks of ice floating in it.

Publication history[edit]

Levistus was first identified as the ruler of Stygia in Planes of Law (1995),[36] and was further described in Dragon #223 (November 1995).[56] His history as part of the Reckoning of Hell was detailed in Guide to Hell (1999).[28]

In third edition, Levistus appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[45] Levistus was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Levistus appears as an unnaturally tall, handsome male human. Aside from his completely black eyes, pointed teeth and his height, no features betray his infernal descent.[4]:148

History[edit]

Levistus obtained rulership over Stygia long ago, right after Asmodeus was crowned King of Hell. Consumed with ambition, Levistus always wanted to take the place of Baator's overlord. Although he shares this scheme with many other arch-lords, Levistus is the most open and direct about it.[4]:149

Upon his most heinous attempt to take control, Levistus tried to subsume Bensozia, Asmodeus's consort whom he thought knew very well her master's weaknesses. At that time, Bensozia was leading a routine inspection of the layers with her pit-fiend escort and Asmodeus's constable, Martinet. While they were travelling across Stygia, Levistus ambushed them and proposed that the Queen of Hell become his consort if she helped him depose Asmodeus. The staunch queen refused harshly and passed him by. Infuriated, the Lord of the Fifth killed Bensozia and her pit-fiend bodyguards while Martinet managed to escape.

Asmodeus quickly spotted the act and punished Levistus by imprisoning him in an iceberg on Stygia. Moreover, the King of Hell gave rulership of the layer to Geryon, another arch-fiend who ruled Stygia until the Reckoning of Hell. When the Reckoning ended, Geryon was demoted and banished. Much to everyone's surprise, Asmodeus returned power to Levistus. However, the arch-lord remained trapped still in his ice prison boulder, forced to communicate with his subordinates solely through telepathy.

Back in charge, Levistus couldn't bring himself to behave. While he can't act physically nor unaided, Stygia's lord still wants to betray and overthrow the Lord of Nessus and blatantly provokes him at any occasion. All the other arch-lords despise and mock him constantly for his derisory condition. Thus, Levistus has no allies among them and tries to raise a cult on the Prime Material Plane to gain more power. His largest cult is the iceberg-based floating city of Icerazor. A fiendish harpy named Azediel controls the city, sacrificing fire-based good creatures to melt the prison of Levistus. Other efforts are made by his servants to melt and chip away at the iceberg, but for each foot of ice that is broken or melted, the cold winds of Stygia refreeze two feet of it. The prison is guarded by devils, but they are said to be willing to take bribes to allow visitors into the presence of the Lord of Stygia.

The prison of Levistus floats randomly around Stygia, going in and out of the Styx and becoming lodged and stuck between other icebergs for years at a time. Disliking these movements, Levistus makes various attempts to control the movements of his prison. He recently attempted to install a series of sails around his prison and have devils use them to steer him around his realm, but all of his attempts are unsuccessful. Some devils swear that anyone who listens to the wind carefully around the iceberg can hear the cruel laughter of the Overlord of Hell each time the iceberg moves in another unwanted direction.

Now that Glasya, the daughter of Asmodeus and Bensozia, seized control of Malbolge, the sixth layer, Levistus's life is on the line like never before. The Princess of Hell wants him dead for killing her mother. Levistus wishes to turn her against her father and use her in his schemes but such a thing is very unlikely.

The rise of Glasya is related to Levistus's return to power. Asmodeus placed the Hag Countess as ruler of Malboge in order to have somebody vulnerable and relatively weak to hold the throne until he and Glasya came to an understanding. Knowing that the other Lords of Hell would be suspicious of his appointment of a non-devil in charge of a layer, Asmodeus decided to distract them by deposing Geryon, the only lord to remain loyal to him during the Reckoning, and replacing him with his ancient enemy Levistus. Hated by the other lords, constantly attempting to make trouble for everybody, and fighting for his release from the iceberg that holds him prisoner, Levistus would be a constant distraction and keep the attention of the archdevils on Stygia and away from Malboge. Levistus himself is said to believe this theory, although he is afraid of the implications.

4th edition[edit]

The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Levistus is still the lord of Stygia. In this version, Levistus had an affair with both Bensozia and Glasya, hoping to use them against Asmodeus. Both fiends believed that they were the sole lover of the lord of Stygia, but after a terrible fight with her father Glasya fled to Stygia to become the open consort of Levistus. Instead, she found her mother in the arms of her lover, and responded by murdering her. Martinet found out what had happened, but was afraid that the truth would weaken Asmodeus, so instead he framed Levistus for the crime. Glasya hates Levistus not for what happened to her mother, but for betraying her affections.

Relationships[edit]

The ruthlessly ambitious Levistus ignores the rules the other Lords of the Nine play by, plotting to conquer every other layer of Hell rather than playing at allegiances. As a result, he is universally disliked in the Hells. Belial is especially eager to take Levistus's territory, and Levistus in turn is trying to sway Gazra into his influence. It may be only a matter of time before he succeeds, but for the time being Gazra remains loyal to Fierna.

Among Levistus's greatest rivalries is that with the Egyptian god Set, who also dwells in Stygia in a black pyramid, and plots to take control of Stygia, then Baator, then all of the multiverse. Levistus's cultists destroy temples of Set whenever possible, while Set wreaks havoc on the cities and amnizu of Stygia; the two powers are currently at an impasse. The sahuagin deity Sekolah is also attempting to wrest control of Stygia from Levistus, convinced the prince would make a quick meal if he ventured outside his iceberg.

If freed, Levistus's most pressing target would be Asmodeus himself. The archomental Cryonax seeks to free Levistus for reasons of his own.

Vassals[edit]

According to Fiendish Codex II, Levistus has amnizu devils as chief chancellors and the following dukes under his command:

  • Agares - 31 companies of osyluths (DR75). Former vassal of Geryon.
  • Erridon Alaka - Male gelugon sorcerer dressed in regal finery. He acts as the eyes & ears of Lord Levistus.
  • Machalas - 11 companies of hamatula (DR75). Former vassal of Geryon.
  • Trinity - Female hellcat whom Levistus speaks through. She declares the edicts which Erridon and Zanth carry out.
  • Zanth - male half-devil human rogue/assassin who is Levistus' enforcer, and surgically removes rival upstarts.

Levistus is said to command all the amnizu devils, whom he encourages to ignore the greater hierarchy and work to betray the pit fiends who ostensibly outrank them.

Realm[edit]

Levistus rules from within his iceberg prison, which floats randomly around Stygia. Although unable to act physically, he is fully aware of all that transpires in his domain. In order to communicate with him, devils must come to his prison and stand before the iceberg to receive telepathic commands.

Worshippers[edit]

Levistus's followers are thugs, rogues, and swashbuckling bravos generally in pursuit of some great betrayal or act of vengeance.

Clergy[edit]

Levistus's clerics are also known as bladereavers. They favor the rapier, and typically live the lives of solitary nomads. They wear flamboyant, silky garb.

Temples[edit]

Levistus has few formal temples, as his followers rarely gather together as a group. He is usually worshipped at portable shrines. The greatest center of the cult of Levistus on the Prime Material Plane is the iceberg city of Icerazer, described in Frostburn. It was founded only a few decades ago by the halfdevil, half harpy assassin Azediel somewhere in the northern ocean (perhaps the Icy Sea). Because of magic inherent in the fortress's creation through the death of a rimefire eidolon, Icerazer acts as a siphon for the power of the souls of all who die within it. This power is channeled directly into Levistus's prison in Stygia, so that each soul weakens it a little more, particularly good-aligned fire creatures. To this end Azediel, a fanatic worshiper of Levistus and now the head of a powerful cult dedicated to that archdevil, sails the seas looking for fresh victims.

Rituals[edit]

In the Prince of Stygia's rituals, chunks of ice are melted in boiling cauldrons.

Apocrypha[edit]

In the apocryphal text Legions of Hell, the Lord of the Fifth Circle is called Leviathan and is said to be an enormous sea monster with a hunger for mortal souls, trapped in a Circle of Hell that can barely contain his massive bulk. He is served by the infernal nobles Nekhet and Krotep, who believe themselves to be the children of Set. He is also served by an aquatic devil called Dagon, Warden of the Stygian Depths, who won fame by thwarting an invasion by Belial.[67]

Lilith[edit]

Lilith
Game background
Title(s) Arch-Duchess of Maladomini, Consort to Baalzebul, formerly consort to Moloch
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus, Baalzebul
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Lilith is the current consort of Baalzebul, the arch-lord currently ruling the Seventh Layer of the Nine Hells of Baator, Maladomini. She shares the title with the subservient and rather spineless Baftis, another she-devil who wields little power.

Creative origins[edit]

Lilith is named after the Lilith of Judeo-Christian myth. This she-demon of Mesopotamian origin was the first wife of Adam, before Eve, who refused to submit to him and thus left Eden for Hell. She is said to be Samael's wife.

Publication history[edit]

Lilith first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Lilith was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] Lilith was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[5]

Description[edit]

Lilith is one of the most attractive female devils of Baator. She looks like a scarlet-skinned human female with a serpent's tail. Her hooves and small curved horns betray her nature. She never wears clothing, and cloaks herself in a veil of darkness, making her look somewhat like Pale Night, an Obyrith queen of the Abyss. She often uses a barbed whip in battle.

History[edit]

Lilith served Baalzebul as consort to Moloch, Baalzebul's viceroy, who was at that time ruling Malbolge, the sixth layer of Baator, for the Lord of the Flies. She was sharing her mate with Malagard, the horrifying Hag Countess. Upon the Reckoning of Hell, Moloch, goaded by Malagard, defied Asmodeus, Baator's overlord. Asmodeus banished Moloch, giving Malbolge to the Hag Countess as a result (though Malagard has since been deposed and Malbolge is now ruled by Glasya).

Unlike Cozbinaer (another consort who was exiled along with her master, Geryon, when the Reckoning ended), Lilith was allowed to remain in Baator, reined in by Baalzebul.

Lilith has a fairly large following (mainly witches and other types of evil spellcasters) in the mortal realm (unlike the other consorts), which ensures a steady supply of souls and sacrifices to her; and thus in turn, the arch-devil to whom she is consort. This fact, in addition to her loyalty to him, made her highly coveted by the Lord of the Seventh.

However, Lilith's said loyalty has dwindled much. As Baalzebul's consort, she feels quite powerless and dislikes having him doing whatever he wants with her. She often works with Tartach, Moloch's former legate who shares her opinions about the Slug Lord's politics and who left his court for that of Glasya. Very seductive, Lilith often manages to get small favors from other male devils. She feels unconcerned about Moloch's fate, the same way she cares not about Baftis's condition and does not view as her true rival.

Machalas[edit]

Machalas
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Levistus
Design details

Machalas is a Duke of Hell in the service of Levistus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Machalas appears as a tall, thin humanoid with black, scaly skin, a black forked tail, black cloven hooves, large black batlike wings, and large jaws. His horned head is a startling fiery red, and his eyes are slanted and entirely white, so that they appear to have no pupils or irises unless examined very closely. His face appears ugly and batlike (the jaws most prominent), and his voice is a soft, menacing, hissing tone. Machalas was formerly a vassal of Geryon, commanding 11 companies of hamatulas (barbed devils). He presently serves Levistus.

Machalas first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6] Machalas was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Martinet[edit]

Martinet
Game background
Title(s) Constable of Nessus
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Martinet is a pit fiend and Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus as his constable. Martinet's job is to clean up the frequent political messes of Baator. His influence has stopped several wars from breaking out among the lords, and his diplomacy has ended even more conflicts. Martinet has an extremely level head, and he never flies off the handle. While he is not greatly powerful himself, he is feared because others know he is the voice and mouth of the Dark Lord of Nessus. Martinet served as the escort for Asmodeus' consort Bensozia as she was leading a routine inspection of the layers. While they were traveling across Stygia, Levistus ambushed them and proposed that the Queen of Hell become his consort if she helped him depose Asmodeus. The staunch queen refused harshly and passed him by. Infuriated, the Lord of the Fifth killed Bensozia and her pit-fiend bodyguards while Martinet managed to escape. In 4th edition, Martinet was escorting Bensozia through her inspection of the middle hells when she was murdered by her own daughter, Glasya. Martinet was responsible for framing Levistus for the crime and securing Glasya during the Reckoning of Hell.

Martinet is first mentioned in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] He also appears on a list of devils in the Monster Manual II later that same year in 1983.[43] In the second edition of the game, Martinet appeared in the supplement Guide to Hell (1999), written by Chris Pramas.[10] In third edition, Martinet appeared in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[29] Martinet was briefly mentioned in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Mephistopheles[edit]

Mephistopheles
Game background
Title(s) Lord of the Eighth
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Mephistopheles is an Arch-Devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), also known as the "Lord of No Mercy" and the "Cold Lord".

Mephistopheles (or Mephisto for short) is the lord of Cania, the eighth plane of Hell. He was the main opponent of Baalzebul during the Reckoning of Hell, and still holds a claim to his own layer. He seeks to take Baalzebul's layer away from him, that he may gain enough power to one day challenge Asmodeus for rulership of all the Nine Hells. His symbol is a flame made of copper and gold, or a red hand with black fingernails shrouded in dark flames. He is constantly coming up with new symbols.

Creative origins[edit]

Mephistopheles is named for the Mephistopheles of Christian mythology.

Publication history[edit]

Mephistopheles was first detailed in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75 (TSR, 1983).[42] He also appeared in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[43] Mephistopheles's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Mephistopheles did not initially appear in 2nd edition, and in the Planescape line the lord of Cania was instead Molikroth. Eventually, it was revealed that Molikroth was a false persona used by Mephistopheles, in Guide to Hell (1999).[10]

In third edition, Mephistopheles appeared along with the other lords of the Nine Hells in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[45] Mephistopheles was further detailed in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

The 4th edition Monster Manual mentions that Mephistopheles is still the lord of Cania.[30]

Description[edit]

In the AD&D sourcebook Monster Manual II, Mephistopheles is a 9-foot-tall (2.7 m), blue-black humanoid with handsome, yet diabolical features. He has huge muscles that befit his great strength, and his speech is whispering wind. His wings, horns, and talons are deep blue and his scales are sooty black. His eyes are pale blue with red irises and pupils.[43] In the 3E supplement Book of Vile Darkness, he is nine feet tall, with red skin, white eyes, horns, bat wings, and straight black hair. He wears flowing black capes and wields a three-pronged ranseur.[45]

Mephistopheles displays to the public world a face of charm, wit, and civility; however, he is infamous for flying into rages when in private and hides a terrible temper from public view. He is a schemer and although he has told Asmodeus to his face that he will rule hell in Asmodeus' stead, the Lord of the Nine allows him to remain in his position due to his more extreme hatred for Baalzebul. His schemes are also always flamboyant and flashy. For example, after the Reckoning he adopted the persona "Molikroth" and launched a fake coup against himself. Much later, he unveiled his true form, revealing that "Molikroth" had been a ruse. Using this method to ferret out traitors, particularly the treacherous pit fiends of his court, he killed or banished any who had aided "Molikroth" during this time.

Relationships[edit]

Mephistopheles is allied with Dispater. He was once an ally of Mammon, but no longer trusts him since the Lord of Avarice betrayed his allies during the Reckoning. Mephistopheles has rebuffed Bel's offers of alliance. Mephistopheles counts himself the enemy of Belial and Baalzebul; should they ever ally against him, he will attempt to use Fierna against her father, either as an ally or a hostage.

Vassals[edit]

The following beings are among the most notable subjects of Mephistopheles. The forces at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

  • Antilia- Lady Antilia, the High Cantor, is a beautiful half-devil/half-elven bard who leads her master's court in hymnals. It is rumored that she is his daughter. The result of a tryst between Lord Mephistopeles and a powerful elven queen turned hellfire cleric. She mirrors her "father's" appearance which further cements these suspicions. She is briefly mentioned in the Book of Vile Darkness.
  • Adonides - Steward (DR76)
  • Baalphegor - Consort to Mephistopheles (DR76)
  • Barbas - Chamberlain of Mephistar (DR76)
  • Bele - Justicar (DR76)
  • Beltorius - A pit fiend servant of Mephistopheles, now allied with fire giants.[68]
  • Bifrons - 26 companies of gelugons (DR76)
  • Buldumech - a pit fiend who formerly served Mephistopheles before defecting to the service of the undead dragon Lashonna.[23]
  • Hutijin - 2 companies of pit fiends (MM2)
  • Testaroun - Lord Testaroun is mentioned in the Book of Vile Darkness. He is an ancient red dragon who was brought to serve his new master through bribes of treasure. Testaroun's job is merely to make Lord Mephistopheles's throneroom look more foreboding. Unlike normal dragons of his kind, Testaroun can now breathe hellfire and is immune to cold, thanks to the personal attentions of his new patron.

Realm[edit]

Mephistopheles rules Cania from a citadel called Mephistar, built on a massive glacier. Once it was a place of chill, staffed with ice devils, but it has become a place of infernal heat since he has developed a new substance known as hellfire.

Worshippers[edit]

Until recently, Mephistopheles operated cults for Asmodeus as part of his vassalage to the Overlord of Hell; many mortals do not realize that he and Asmodeus are separate beings. He has been slowly weaseling out of these duties in favor of establishing cults of his own, based on promising his worshippers control over hellfire, a magical substance of his own design. These hidden cults do not restrict themselves to lawful evil members. Clerics, wizards, warlocks, and sorcerers are his most frequent converts. His covens typically consist of schemers and megalomaniacs. Fire giants and other fire-based creatures often attempt to become disciples of Mephistopheles.

Clergy[edit]

The leaders of Mephistopheles' cults are known as hellfire stewards or hellfire masters. They wear black and red. Their favored weapon is the ranseur. They usually do not speak, but when they must speak, they shout.

Temples[edit]

Temples to Mephistopheles feature massive fire pits in which victims are burnt alive. These pits are usually rigged so that they flare up at times that are inconvenient to passerby. The altar is a slab of dark stone, blackened by flame.

Unholy texts[edit]

The Book of Brimstone was written by a monk called Andros during a period he spent in Mephistopheles's own palace. Although he subsequently went insane and was lost in the wastes of Cania, the four known copies of the tome are highly sought-after by Mephistopheles's worshipers. The first portion of the Book describes the proper worship of Mephistopheles, instructions for sacrificing to the devil, and instructions for becoming his disciple. The second part includes a small collection of arcane spells with an infernal bent.

Artifacts and relics[edit]

  • The Heart of Mephistopheles is a massive ruby, a foot in diameter, that contains a portion of Mephistopheles's own intellect. It allows its wielders to dominate and slay those who oppose them; it also creates a mile-radius are in which summoned devils cannot be magically dismissed back to their home plane. Its method of destruction is a closely guarded secret. The Heart is currently in the hands of the pit fiend Beltorius.
  • Baalphegor's Grace is a vial containing the blood and tears of Mephistopheles's consort, Baalphegor. Those who drink from it and survive can command a flight of deadly erinyes known as the Blessed Angels. This artifact is currently in the hands of the undead dragon, Lashonna.

Mephistopheles in other media[edit]

Mephistopheles appeared as himself, Lord of Cania, in the role-playing video game Neverwinter Nights: Hordes of the Underdark, where he planned to invade the city of Waterdeep and lay claim to Faerûn and later Toril. The player is supposed to defeat Mephistopheles in order to finish the game. As well, in the said game, Mephistopheles did not destroy his traitorous generals after the Molikroth Rebellion, but rather banished them by the power of their true names.

Mephistopheles is also the patron deity of characters Komiyan and Gort in the Keenspot webcomic Darken. He lays the quest upon Gort that drives the main plot of the comic forward[citation needed].

Other publishers[edit]

Mephistopheles appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 21.[16]

Moloch[edit]

Moloch
Game background
Design details

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Moloch is an arch-devil of Hell (Baator in later editions of the game), and once served as the viceroy of Baalzebul.

Creative origins[edit]

Moloch is based on the Moloch of traditional demonology.[citation needed]

Publishing history[edit]

Moloch first appeared in Gary Gygax's article "From the Sorcerer's Scroll: New Denizens of Devildom," in Dragon #75, as part of a preview for the Monster Manual II.[42] He appeared in the Monster Manual II later that same year in 1983.[43] Moloch's realm was further detailed in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Moloch did not initially appear in 2nd edition, and in the Planescape line the lord of Malbolge was instead the Hag Countess. Eventually, it was revealed that Moloch had been betrayed by the Hag Countess, who deposed him as the lord of his layer, in Guide to Hell (1999).[10] He was a major villain of the 2000 adventure The Apocalypse Stone, in which he inadvertently became stranded on a dying world as part of his bid to retake his layer of Hell.[69]

Moloch was described briefly in the Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] The most detail on Moloch can be found in issue #360 of the internet-only version of Dragon magazine.[70]

Description[edit]

Moloch is a great, square-bodied creature with red-orange skin. His limbs are short and thick, and his hands and feet are huge and square, with horns on his feet. His head is also horned, and huge with slanting fiery eyes and a gaping mouth. His monstrous body conceals a genius-level intellect.

History[edit]

Like many of the oldest lords of Hell, Moloch was once an angel created by the powers of Law to battle the demons of the Abyss in the Age Before Ages, before the Battle of Pesh and the subsequent realignment of the planes. Of all the warriors in the legions serving Asmodeus, it is said that Moloch was the greatest. He was rewarded for his prowess and loyalty with rulership of the sixth plane of Hell, Malbolge. In order to check his power, however, Asmodeus made him the vassal of Baalzebul, serving as the Lord of the Flies' viceroy on the layer he controlled. Asmodeus hoped Moloch and Baalzebul would spend their time watching one another for signs of betrayal rather than trying to storm Nessus.

This worked for a time, but Moloch and Baalzebul allied with Zariel and Belial in the Reckoning of Hell some millennia back in order to do just as Asmodeus had feared. The Lord of the Ninth was prepared, of course, and defeated the rebels handily when their pit fiend generals betrayed them.

Moloch was replaced by his mistress, the Hag Countess, who had set him up to fall. For centuries, Moloch had been recruiting allies and gathering new minions in preparation for seizing back his old domain through military force. Three days before his intended invasion, he hid in a backwater world on the Prime Material Plane to wait for the appropriate moment to plane shift to the Hells in a surprise attack. By an unfortunate coincidence, the world (obviously not Oerth) was severed from contact with other planes due to an unforeseen cataclysm involving the theft of the stone around which the world had been created. As Moloch was unable to leave his erstwhile hiding place, his army was slaughtered by minions of the Hag Countess.

Though the Hag Countess has since been replaced by Asmodeus's daughter Glasya, Moloch now dwells among the other outcast devils of Avernus, Hell's first layer. He works with other exiles to rebuild his army and return to power, overthrowing Glasya and, he hopes, one day Asmodeus too.

Vassals[edit]

Before his overthrow, the following beings were among the most notable subjects of Moloch. The forces formerly at their disposal are listed, where appropriate:

In The Apocalypse Stone, Moloch is served by several fiends, including:

Moloch also creates a squad of flesh golems created from the stitched-together body parts of the player characters' friends and family.

Worshippers[edit]

Moloch's cults are small and fractious, disturbed by their masters' long absence. They cannot cast spells higher than 3rd level.

Other publishers[edit]

Moloch appeared under the "devil" heading in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[71]

Moloch appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 1: Princes of Darkness (2009), on page 17.[16]

Morax[edit]

Morax
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Morax is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus. Morax is a cloven-hooved, humanoid devil. He has a bull-like head, with massive curved horns (somewhat like Moloch), bat-like wings, and heavily muscled arms. He has a short forked tail. His entire body is a dark, dirty brown in hue, and his eyes are scarlet. He has a cluster of 2-inch-long spines on his chest, and in battle loves to hug victims against this cluster. Morax is a vassal of Asmodeus, commanding 9 companies of pit fiends.

Morax first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Morax was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Naome[edit]

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, Naome "the Golden," was the clever consort of Belial, the arch-devil who formerly ruled the 4th layer of Baator, Phlegethos. She is the mother of Lady Fierna, Belial's daughter who is currently ruling the layer. As of Fiendish Codex II, Naome is deceased. Naome is derived from a real-life mythological demon who sports the same name.

Publication history[edit]

Naome first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part I" in Dragon #75 (1983).[6]

Naome was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2]

Naome was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[3]

Description[edit]

Naome has been successively described as a golden skinned she-devil of great beauty and then as a red-skinned, husky female devil with human-flesh-colored hands, face and shoulders, aside from typical baatezu features (cloven hooves, forked tail etc.), brown hair and pale green eyes. These patterns may suggest she's the one responsible for anything regarding dealing with humans and mortals.

History[edit]

Naome was a skilled seductress and very effective in terms of communication and diplomacy. She was Lady Fierna's personal advisor and was highly regarded for her ability to settle disputes and her shrewdness when bargaining with mortals. Quite surprisingly, she had a very light, pleasant humor, which is a very rare thing among the Dukes of Baator. While she had no real enemy in the Nine Hells, she disliked Glasya and Lilith but was quite friendly to the quiet Baftis, and she felt sympathy for the grim-fated Cozbinaer.

Although not as powerful as her master, Naome's role at Belial's court was very important. It's been said that, as the Reckoning of Hell ended, she advised her consort into placing their daughter on the throne and using her to rule Phlegethos, in order to avoid demotion from Asmodeus. This maneuver has proven to be quite efficient and Naome constantly acted behind the scenes alongside Belial.

Naome met her death at the hands of Asmodeus himself. As of Dragon #360, it has been explained that Asmodeus eventually found out the truth behind Belial's voluntary withdrawal. Not being able to get rid of Belial anymore, Asmodeus decided to punish Naome for being too cunning for his tastes and destroyed her. This last action earned him a bitter grudge from Belial and Fierna.

While rumors go that Belial and Lady Fierna are having an incestuous relationship, it seemed that Naome was unconcerned. Another rumor was that she was actually of undetermined gender, explaining her mannish build.

Neabaz[edit]

Neabaz
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Baalzebul
Design details

Neabaz is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul. Neabaz appears as a smoothly polite, cold-blooded, and very handsome man—save for his tiny pointed horns and transparent, housefly-like wings. He is customarily garbed in black tunic (open at the shoulders to accommodate his wings) and breeches, with a hat and cape of rich, blood-red silk. The cape is magical, having the ability to give forth an aura of flames. When his human-like mouth is open, he can extrude a foot-long proboscis from within and suck blood. Neabaz serves as Baalzebul's herald. Neabaz first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Neabaz was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Neabaz was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Phongor[edit]

Phongor
Game background
Title(s) Inquisitor of Hell
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Phongor is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Phongor first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Phongor was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Description[edit]

Phongor appears as a man with dead-white skin, glittering pink eyes, a hoarse, hissing voice, tiny horns, oily black hair, a forked tail, and red hooves. He wears open purple or black robes, and a belt to carry his whip.

Relationships[edit]

Phongor is a vassal of Asmodeus, serving as Asmodeus's inquisitor. Phongor is a rival of Adramalech, and has subverted some of Adramalech's spies. Phongor and Adramalech both feuded with Armaros before he was exiled as an outcast devil and made one of the Rabble of Devilkin.

Rimmon[edit]

Rimmon
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Rimmon is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus. Rimmon commands 5 companies of gelugons (ice devils). Rimmon appears as a gelugon with a handsome, human-like diabolic horned head.

Rimmon first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Rimmon was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Tartach[edit]

Tartach
Game background
Title(s) Chamberlain of Malbolge
Home plane Baator
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful evil
Portfolio n/a
Domains n/a
Superior Glasya
Design details

Tartach is a Duke of Hell in the service of Glasya.

Publication history[edit]

Tartach first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1]

Tartach was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4] Tartach was detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #361 (December 2007) in the second part of the "Infernal Aristocracy" feature.[5]

Description[edit]

Tartach appears as a human of giant stature wearing a beard and mustache and with stubby, hooked horns on his forehead. He has no tail, but his feet have the pads and fur (but not the claws) of a lion, and his skin is of a fiery orange hue. He wears robes of black or purple silk, and walks with cold dignity. Tartach has a dark, cruel sense of humor, and he savors the screams of the creatures he tortures. He is a powerful spellcaster, said to be one of the most dangerous workers of magic in the Nine Hells and certainly the most potent in Malbolge, except possibly for Glasya herself.

Relationships[edit]

Tartach is currently Glasya's chamberlain and consort. He was formerly a servant of Moloch and Baalzebul, and briefly entered into an alliance with Geryon. While Geryon never appreciated his talents, Glasya has showered him with gifts and affection. Even so, he hopes to rise in status still further, hoping that Glasya might recommend him to her father Asmodeus when next the rulership of a layer of Hell lays vacant. He doesn't suspect she will, however, so he is attempting to ingratiate himself into another court, where he hopes to bring down a lord of Hell from within as once he helped bring down Moloch and Geryon. In particular, he would like to see Baalzebul brought low, though Baalzebul makes no secret of his hatred for his former servant, having sent several assassins after the chamberlain already.

Tartach also worries that Moloch will soon have amassed an army great enough to seize control of Malbolge again.

History[edit]

Like many of the oldest devils, Tartach is said to have once been a celestial. After Baalzebul was given command of Maladomini, Tartach bound his fate to the that of the Lord of the Flies. Baalzebul sent Tartach to Malbolge to serve as the legate to Baalzebul's viceroy Moloch. There, he served Moloch as his deputy and as the ambassador to Moloch's vassals. Though outwardly maintaining a facade of loyalty toward Baalzebul, Tartach chafed at what he considered to be an inconsequential position, seeing other devils of lesser strength being granted more important titles elsewhere in the Hells. So it was that Tartach entered into a conspiracy with Malagarde, Beleth, and Geryon to ensure Moloch's doom, hoping it would clear the way for Tartach to rise in status. Malagarde began cuckolding Moloch with Geryon, and when she was with Moloch she whispered words encouraging the viceroy to join a rebellion against Asmodeus himself, the war that became known as the Reckoning of Hell. When the rebels were defeated in that war, Malagarde and Beleth encouraged Moloch to remain defiant instead of humbled, and as a result Moloch was exiled.

Tartach intended to double-cross both Geryon and Malagarde, but while his treachery was said to play a part in Geryon's fall, Malagarde double-crossed both Geryon and Tartach, seizing control of Malbolge for herself and exiling every noble who once served Moloch, leaving only Beleth to serve her as her spymaster. Instead of being rewarded for his efforts, Tartach was recalled to Baalzebul's court to serve there once again. There, Tartach was seduced by Glasya, who had abandoned Mammon but was currently teasing Baalzebul. She took Tartach on as her new lover instead, convincing him to throw in his lot with hers. Before any of their plans could bear fruit, however, Malagarde's flawed attempt at apotheosis resulted in her merging with her layer, leaving a vacuum of power that was filled after Asmodeus appointed his daughter Glasya to serve as the new Lord of the Sixth. Glasya invited Tartach to join her as her chamberlain.

Zagum[edit]

Zagum
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Asmodeus
Design details

Zagum is a Duke of Hell in the service of Asmodeus, he commands 30 companies of hamatula (barbed devils). Zagum appears as a gigantic hamatula with a fifteen foot long tail and a jagged row of barbed spines running up his back, cumulating in a bony collar edged with spines at the back and sides of his head. His scaled skin is crimson, his eyes yellow and catlike.

Zagum first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Zagum was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

Zepar[edit]

Zepar
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Superior Baalzebul
Design details

Zepar is a Duke of Hell in the service of Baalzebul, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Zepar appears as a slight, dark-complexioned man dressed in scarlet armor, with a grotesque clubfoot and a forked tail. He has small horns (concealed by his helm) and speaks in a grating, contemptuous voice. Beneath his armor is crimson skin, and a “normal” human foot that has retractile black catlike claws. Zepar is a vassal of Baalzebul, commanding 28 companies of cornugons (horned devils).

Zepar first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Part II" in Dragon #76 (1983).[1] Zepar was briefly mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[2] Zepar was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Part II." Dragon #76 (TSR, 1983)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g McComb, Colin. Faces of Evil: The Fiends. (TSR, 1997)
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Laws, Robin D, and Robert J. Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (Wizards of the Coast, 2006)
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Laws, Robin D, and Robert J Schwalb. Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (Wizards of the Coast, 2006)
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