Bukola Oriola

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Bukola Oriola
Born 1976
Nigeria
Residence Anoka County, Minnesota
Nationality American
Ethnicity Nigerian American
Citizenship United States
Occupation Journalist
Years active 1999-present
Organization Imprisoned Show
Known for Being trafficked from Nigeria to the United States
Notable work(s) Imprisoned: The Travails of a Trafficked Victim
Children Samuel Jacobs

Bukola Oriola (born 1976) is a Nigerian American journalist and former human trafficking victim.[1] She lives in Anoka County, Minnesota[2] and has a son named Samuel Jacobs.[3] She spent six years as a journalist covering education in Nigeria while still living in that country.[4] In 2005, she came to the United States from Nigeria on a two-month work permit in order to cover a New York City meeting of the United Nations General Assembly.[5] She married a US citizen who prevented her from establishing interpersonal relationships with anyone other than himself.[6] He subjugated her to a life of unfree labour, confiscating all of her earnings.[7] She was imprisoned in her home in this manner for two years.[8]

Publicity[edit]

She wrote the book Imprisoned: The Travails of a Trafficked Victim about her experiences with human trafficking.[9] In August 2013, she appeared on a discussion panel following a screening of the documentary film Not My Life at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs' Cowles Auditorium. [10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bukola". Imprisoned Show. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  2. ^ Elyse Kaner (May 21, 2013). "Anoka County resident heads fundraiser for human trafficking victims". ECM Publishers. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  3. ^ Sharon Schmickle (August 12, 2013). "How saving $40 a month can protect from poverty and predatory lenders". MinnPost. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  4. ^ Jane Lightbourn (March 16, 2010). "Bukola Oriola tells her story April 10 at UMC". Hastings Star Gazette. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  5. ^ Julie Buntjer (August 19, 2013). "Fighting to be free: Nigerian woman to speak on human trafficking in Worthington". Daily Globe. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  6. ^ Nora Leinen (December 16, 2009). "Human trafficking in Minnesota". Twin Cities Daily Planet. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ Allie Shah (March 31, 2011). "Trafficking victims share pain, healing through art". Star Tribune. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  8. ^ Elyse Kaner (May 15, 2013). "Anoka County resident heads fundraiser for human trafficking victims". Sun Focus. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  9. ^ Kathy Magnuson (December 27, 2009). "Changemaker2009: Bukola Oriola". Twin Cities Daily Planet. Retrieved September 10, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Not My Life: Human Trafficking, Globally and Locally". Minnesota International Center. Retrieved August 16, 2013.