Bulkeley Bridge

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Bulkeley Bridge
215 10 Morgan G. Bulkeley Bridge.jpg
Official name Morgan G. Bulkeley Bridge
Carries Motor vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles
I‑84 / US 6 / US 44
Crosses Connecticut River
Locale Hartford, Connecticut
Maintained by ConnDOT[1]
Design stone arch bridge
Total length 1,075 feet (328 m)
Width 110 feet (34 m)
Longest span 119 feet (36 m)
Clearance below 39 feet (12 m)
Construction begin 1903
Construction end 1908[2]
Opened 1908
Coordinates

41°46′10″N 72°39′55″W / 41.76944°N 72.66528°W / 41.76944; -72.66528

Morgan G. Bulkeley Bridge
Bulkeley Bridge is located in Connecticut
Bulkeley Bridge
Location Hartford and East Hartford
Coordinates 41°46′10″N 72°39′55″W / 41.76944°N 72.66528°W / 41.76944; -72.66528Coordinates: 41°46′10″N 72°39′55″W / 41.76944°N 72.66528°W / 41.76944; -72.66528
Built 1908
Architect Graves, Edwin D., Wheelwright, Edmund M.
Architectural style CLASSICAL REVIVAL
NRHP Reference # 93001347
Added to NRHP 1993-12-10

The Bulkeley Bridge (also known as Hartford Bridge, Bridge No. 980A) is a stone arch bridge composed of nine spans located in Hartford, Connecticut. The bridge carries Interstate 84, U.S. Route 6 and U.S. Route 44 across the Connecticut River, connecting Hartford to East Hartford. As of 2005 the bridge carried an average daily traffic of 142,500 cars.[3]

The Bulkeley Bridge is one of the oldest bridges in use in the Interstate Highway System.[4] It is also the largest stone arch bridge in the world.[5] The Bulkeley Bridge is named for Connecticut governor and United States Senator, Morgan Bulkeley.

History[edit]

The current bridge is the third at that location.

The first bridge was built in 1810. Washed away in 1818, it was succeeded by a covered bridge, which burned in 1895. The current bridge opened in 1908.[6]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CT DOT
  2. ^ Connecticut's historic highway bridges
  3. ^ 2005 Traffic Volumes State Maintained Highway Network (Traffic Log); State of Connecticut Department of Transportation p89.
  4. ^ Oldest bridges currently used in interstate system; gatago.com
  5. ^ Hartford 'Firsts' and Other Interesting Facts at the Wayback Machine (archived May 14, 2009)
  6. ^ Delany, Edmund Thomas (1983). The Connecticut River: New England's Historic Waterway. The Globe Pequot Press. p. 91. ISBN 978-0-87106-980-1.