Bundesautobahn 92

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A92
Bundesautobahn 92
Route information
Length: 134 km (83 mi)
Location
States: Bavaria
Highway system
  • Roads in Germany

The Bundesautobahn 92 (translates from German as Federal Motorway 92, short form Autobahn 92, abbreviated as BAB 92 or A 92) connects Munich with Deggendorf, and is 134 kilometers long. Between the interchange Neufahrn and the interchange Munich Airport it has three lanes, otherwise two with a shoulder. There is a traffic control system in the direction of Deggendorf until right before the exit to the airport.

The A 92 essentially follows the lower Isar so that it passes Freising, Moosburg, Landshut, Dingolfing, Landau, Plattling and Deggendorf. Currently it is the most important connection between Munich and the East Central European countries like Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary. After completion of A 94 (Munich–Passau) a part of the traffic load for eastern Europe will shift towards that Autobahn.

The 60 km stretch of the A 92 between Landshut and Plattling has a very low traffic density. This is also the reason that the A 92 is used in part as a test stretch by the BMW factory in Dingolfing. One notes that among other things the road surface is better in the vicinity of Dingolfing.

History[edit]

The first conception of building of an Autobahn along the Isar was at the end of the 1960s. It started with the extension of Bundesstraße 11, and with the building of a bypass for Wallersdorf. Until 1970, a small piece of 5 km length of the autobahn was completed already around Wallersdorf, it was named 5-Minuten-Autobahn.

The last section between Dingolfing and Wallersdorf, 21 kilometers long, was completed in 1988.

Originally it was planned to extend the A 92 over its present end in Munich out to the Landshuter Allee, where it would have had a connection to the second Munich ring road A 999. This plan has not been executed.

Rest Areas[edit]

At the A 92 there are no filling stations or rest areas in the conventional sense (with an own exit). Therefore smaller gasoline station booths developed to rest areas at many of the exits.


External links[edit]