Bunte Republik Neustadt

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BRN issued fun passport, 1991

The Bunte Republik Neustadt (German: literally "Colourful Republic of Neustadt") was a micronation in Dresden in Germany, in parts of the city's district Dresden-Neustadt, from 1990 to 1993; nowadays every year in June a 3-day cultural festival is celebrated there under the same name.

History[edit]

The name Bunte Republik (Colourful Republic) is a play on words on the term Bundesrepublik (Federal Republic) that the founders of micronation alluded to as an alternative way, at the time of the Wende before East Germany joined the Federal Republic of Germany.

In June 1990, the Bunte Republik was set up by a provisional government that was headed by a "Monarch without portfolio" and constituted of several ministers responsible for example for "Defence Power Ripping and Rapping" (Wehrkraftzerfetzung) or "Unculture and Submarines" (Unkultur und Unterseeboote). The provisional government demanded unification with Vatican City and issued decrees about land and property ownership and freedom of movement. A own currency, called Neustadtmark, that was based on the East German currency, was issued. A coat of arms of created that retained elements of the coat of arms of East Germany with the head of Mickey Mouse featuring in the centre. Celebrating the founding of the Bunte Republik, the professional government organised a street festival that was held 21–23 June 1991 in Dresden-Neustadt.

Street festival[edit]

BRN festival, 2006
BRN festival, 2007

Nowadays during the annual festival, certain streets are closed off, with vendors selling food and drink, DJs and live bands playing music, and various other performances. To prevent the festival of become too commercial only residents, clubs and bars that are home in the festival area are permitted to sell drinks and food on the streets. Attractions and events are applied by a lot of locals to the regulatory authority and there is no organising host.

The festival draws large crowds from all walks of life. In 2006, more than 150,000 people attended, and over 100 bands played in the streets and parks of this area, with a total of more than 1000 artists participating. The two nights of the festival can be interpreted as a large house and street party with several stages and balcony-raves which ten-thousands of people attend.

Since 2001, as a result of several festival overshadowed by rioting, beverages sold in glass bottles is forbidden; the festival usually occurs under a strong police presence[1] while it rested easy in recent years.

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