Burchard of Würzburg

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Saint Burchard of Würzburg
BurckarduswholeBW.jpg
Engraving by Johann Salver.
Born unknown
England
Died c. 750
Würzburg
Honored in Roman Catholic Church
Feast 14/10
The statue of Saint Burkhard on Würzburg's Alte Mainbrücke.

Burchard of Würzburg was a Bishop of Würzburg in 741–754.

He was an Anglo-Saxon who left England after the death of his kinsfolk and joined Boniface in his missionary labors, some time after 732. When Boniface organized bishoprics in Middle Germany, he placed Burchard over that of Würzburg; his consecration can not have occurred later than the summer of 741, since in the autumn of that year, we find him officiating as a bishop at the consecration of Willibald of Eichstädt.

Pope Zachary confirmed the new bishopric in 743. Burchard appears again as a member of the first German council in 742, and as an envoy to Rome from Boniface in 748. With Fulrad of Saint-Denis, he brought to Zachary the famous question of Pepin, whose answer was supposed to justify the assumption of regal power by the Carolingians.

His feast day is 14 October.[1]

Literature[edit]

Konrad Schäfer / Heinrich Schießer: Leben und Wirken des hl. Burkhard (Bad Neustädter Beiträge zur Geschichte und Heimatkunde Frankens, Band 4). Bad Neustadt a. d. Saale 1986: ISBN 3-9800482-4-1

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "St. Burchard of Würzurg". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainJackson, Samuel Macauley, ed. (1914). "article name needed". New Schaff–Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (third ed.). London and New York: Funk and Wagnalls.