Chinese Expeditionary Force (Burma)

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The reunion of The Chinese Expeditionary Force and the Chinese Army in India (X-Force and Y-Force).

Chinese Expeditionary Force Order of Battle

1st Route Expeditionary Forces - Lo Cho-ying (Late February 1942) [1]

  • Commander – US Army Lieut.-General Joseph Stilwell (Burma HQ established 21 March 1942) [4]
  • Chief of the Chinese General Staff Mission to Burma - Lieut.-General Lin Wei[4]
  • Executive Officer to General Stilwell - Lieut.-General Lo Cho-ying[4]
  • 36th Division - Li Chih-peng [grd] [1] in Yunnan as reserve, defended Salween crossing at Huitung Bridge
  • 88th Division - ? [grd] [1] Sent in May to defend Salween crossing at Huitung Bridge
  • 2nd Reserve Division - ? [1] sent in May to defend Salween crossing at Huitung Bridge (used as guerillas in Japanese rear).
  • Training Depot - ? [4]
    • 1st Reserve Regiment - ? [4]
    • 2nd Reserve Regiment - ? [4]
  • 5th Army - Du Yuming[1], (Lieut.-General Tu Yu-ming, designated 2nd-in-Command to Luo Zhuoying) [4]
    • New 22nd Division - Liao Yao-hsiang[廖耀湘], (Major-General Liao Yao-shiang) [4]
      • 64th Regiment
      • 65th Regiment
      • 66th Regiment
    • 96th Division - Yu Chao (Major-General Yu Shao)
      • 286th Regiment
      • 287th Regiment
      • 288th Regiment
    • 200th Division - Tai An-lan[戴安澜], (Major-General Tai An Lan) [4] [m]
      • 598thRegiment
      • 599th Regiment
      • 600th Regiment
    •  ? Engineer Regiment - Li Shu-cheng
    • 1st Armoured Regiment - Hu Hsien-chun
      • 18 Cv-33 light tanks
    •  ? Artillery Regiment - Chu Mo-chin
    • Truck Regiment - Hung Shih-shou
    • Signal battalion [4]
    • Cavalry regiment [4]
  • 6th Army - Kan Liu-chu[1] (Lieut.-General Kan Li-chu) [4] [entered Burma during Feb-42]
    • 49th Division - Peng Pi-sheng[1] (Major-General Peng Pi-shen) [4]
      • 145th Regiment
      • 146th Regiment
      • 147th Regiment
    • 93rd Division - Lu Kuo-chuan[1],(Lieut.-General Lu Kuo Ch’uan) [4]
      • 277th Regiment
      • 278th Regiment
      • 279th Regiment
    • 55th Provisional Division - Chen Mien-wu[1],(Lieut.-General Ch’en Mien-wu) [4]
      • 1st Regiment
      • 2nd Regiment
      • 3rd Regiment
    • Engineer battalion[4]
    • Transport battalion[4]
    • Signal Battalion[4]
    • 1st Battalion, 13th Artillery Regiment[4]
  • 66th Army - Chang Chen[1] (Lieut-General Ma Wei-chi) [4] [entered Burma from mid-Apr-42]
    • New 28th Division - Liu Po-lung[1],( (Major-General Liu Po-lung) [4]
      • 82nd Regiment
      • 83rd Regiment
      • 84th Regiment
    • New 29th Division - Ma Wei-chi[1],(Major-General Ma Wei-chei) [4]
      • 85th Regiment
      • 86th Regiment
      • 87th Regiment
    • New 38th Division - Sun Li-jen[1],(Lieut.-General Sun Li-jen) [4] [Finance Ministry Tax Police grd]
      • 112th Regiment
      • 113th Regiment
      • 114th Regiment
    • 1st Battalion, 18th Artillery Regiment[4]

Notes:

Air forces: [3][edit]

17th Pursuit Squadron / 5th Pursuit Group - squadron commander Liu Qingguang

  • Base: Lashio ; Burma (/42 – summer/42)
  • 11 x I-153's

American Volunteer Group - Claire Chennault

  • 1st Squadron ’Adam & Eves’ - Squadron Leader Robert Neale[1] (07/02/42 – 04/07/42)
    • Base: Mingaladon (14/01/42 – ), Lashio (03/42 – 27/04/42)
    • Curtiss P-40's
  • 2nd Squadron ’Panda Bears’- Squadron Leader John Newkirk[2] (18/08/41 – 24/03/42), Squadron Leader David Hill (24/03/42 – 04/07/42)
    • Base: Mingaladon (30/12/41 – 08/02/42), Loiwing (08/02/42 -), Magwe (08/02/42 – ), Kunming (08/02/42 – )
    • Curtiss P-40's
  • 3rd Squadron ’Hell’s Angels’- Squadron Leader Arvid Olson[3] (14/08/41 – 04/07/42)
    • Base: Mingaladon (12/12/41 – 03/42), Magwe (03/42 – 22/03/42), Lashio (03/42 – 27/04/42)
    • Curtiss P-40's

Notes

  • At the end of January 1942 eleven I-153s of the 17th Pursuit Squadron led by squadron commander Liu Qingguang, were quartered at Kunming (Yunnan Province). According to intentions, they were to repulse Japanese air attacks together with the American volunteers, who also were stationed there. However after some time they were sent on to Lashio airbase in Burma where they were utilised for communications and in May flew sorties attacking ground targets.

Sources:

  • [1] Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) 2nd Ed., 1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung, Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.
  • [2] [g] German trained Divisions: 3rd, 6th, 9th, 14th, 36th, 87th, 88th, and the Training Division of the Central Military Academy. Also the "Tax Police" regiment (equivalent of a division) under T.V. Soong's Ministry of Finance, later converted to the New 38th division during the war. From: "History of the Frontal (i.e. KMT) War Zone in the Sino-Japanese War", published by Nanjing University Press. Posted by yexu on Apr 7 2005, 04:28 AM - http://www.china-defense.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=8871&st=0&#entry176135[broken citation]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rossi, J.R. "1st Squadron Roster The Flying Tigers". The Flying Tigers - American Volunteer Group - Chinese Air Force. 
  2. ^ Rossi, J.R. "2nd Squadron Roster The Flying Tigers". The Flying Tigers - American Volunteer Group - Chinese Air Force. 
  3. ^ Rossi, J.R. "3rd Squadron Roster The Flying Tigers". The Flying Tigers - American Volunteer Group - Chinese Air Force.