Burmese–Siamese wars

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Burmese–Siamese wars were a series of wars fought between Burma and Siam from the 16th to 19th centuries.[1][2]

Toungoo–Ayutthaya[edit]

No. Name Results Notes
1 Burmese–Siamese War (1548) Siamese defensive victory First Siege of Ayutthaya
Siam defeats first Burmese invasion
2 Burmese–Siamese War (1563–1564) Burmese victory Second Siege of Ayutthaya also called the War of the White Elephant.
Siam becomes Burmese vassal (1564–1568)
3 Burmese–Siamese War (1568–1569) Burmese victory Third Siege of Ayutthaya
Siam again becomes Burmese vassal (1569–1584)
4 Burmese–Siamese War (1584–1593) Siamese victory Fourth Siege of Ayutthaya
Siam regains independence; regains lower Tenasserim coast to Tavoy (Dawei)
5 Burmese–Siamese War (1594–1605) Siamese victory Siamese invasions of Burma
Siam conquers the entire Tenasserim coast to Martaban (1594)
Lan Na (Chiang Mai) becomes Siamese vassal (1602–1614)[3]
6 Burmese–Siamese War (1613–1614) Burmese victory Burma regains Lan Na and upper Tenasserim coast to Tavoy
7 Burmese–Siamese War (1662–1664) Burmese defensive victory Burma defends Lan Na and upper Tenasserim coast
8 Burmese–Siamese War (1675–1676) Burmese defensive victory
Siamese defensive victory
Burma defends upper Tenasserim coast (1675)
Siam defeats counter Burmese invasion (1675–1676)
9 Burmese–Siamese War (1700–1701) Siamese defensive victory Siam defeats Burmese invasion

Konbaung–Ayutthaya[edit]

No. Name Results Notes
1 Burmese–Siamese War (1759–60) Burmese victory Fifth Siege of Ayutthaya
Burma regains upper Tenasserim coast to Tavoy
2 Burmese–Siamese War (1765–67) Burmese victory Sixth Siege of Ayutthaya
Burma conquers lower Tenasserim coast; end of Ayutthaya Kingdom

Konbaung–Bangkok[edit]

No. Name Results Notes
1 Burmese–Siamese War (1775–1776) Siamese defensive victory Burma fails to recover southern Lan Na (Chiang Mai)
2 Burmese–Siamese War (1785–1786) Siamese defensive victory Also known as Nine Armies' Wars, Siam defeats Burmese invasion
Siam gains control of northern Lan Na (Chiang Saen), and Chan and Mook defend Thalang
3 Burmese–Siamese War (1787) Burmese defensive victory Burma defends Tenasserim coast
4 Burmese–Siamese War (1792) Burmese defensive victory Burma defends Tenasserim coast
Siam formally cedes Tennaserim to Burma per treaty (1793)[4]
5 Burmese–Siamese War (1797) Siamese defensive victory Siam defends Lan Na and Luang Phrabang
6 Burmese–Siamese War (1803–1808) Burmese defensive victory Burma defends Kengtung and Sipsongpanna; fails to regain Chiang Saen
7 Burmese–Siamese War (1809–1812) Siamese defensive victory Siam defends Junkceylon; credited to Maha Senanurak
8 First Anglo-Burmese War (1824 – 1826) Beginning of the end of Burmese independence Siam takes no serious part, but as a nominal British ally, secures a treaty with the UK
9 Burmese–Siamese War (1849–1855) Burmese defensive victory Burma defends Kengtung[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Harvey, pp. xxviii-xxx
  2. ^ James, p. 302
  3. ^ Fernquest, SOAS, pp. 51–52
  4. ^ Symes, SOAS, p. 98
  5. ^ Hardiman, pp. 408-409

References[edit]

  • Fernquest, Jon (Spring 2005). "The Flight of Lao War Captives from Burma Back to Laos in 1596: A Comparison of Historical Sources". SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research (SOAS, University of London) 3 (1). ISSN 1479-8484. 
  • Hardiman, John Percy (1901). Sir James George Scott, ed. Gazetteer of Upper Burma and Shan States Part 2 1. Government Press, British Burma. 
  • Harvey, G. E. (1925). History of Burma: From the Earliest Times to 10 March 1824. London: Frank Cass & Co. Ltd. 
  • James, Helen (2004). "Burma-Siam Wars and Tenasserim". In Keat Gin Ooi. Southeast Asia: a historical encyclopedia, from Angkor Wat to East Timor, Volume 2. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1-57607-770-5. 
  • Steinberg, David Joel (1987). David Joel Steinberg, ed. In Search of South-East Asia. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 
  • Siam Society (1904). The Journal of the Siam Society 1–3. Bangkok: Siam Society. 
  • Symes, Michael (Spring 2006). "An Account of an Embassy to the Kingdom of Ava, Sent by the Governor-General of India, in the year of 1795". SBBR (SOAS, University of London) 4. 
  • Wyatt, David K. (2003). History of Thailand (2 ed.). Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-08475-7.