Burs Church

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Burs Church, external view

Burs Church (Swedish: Burs kyrka) is a medieval Lutheran church on the Swedish island of Gotland, in the Diocese of Visby.

History and architecture[edit]

Detail of the altarpiece (15th century)

The church in Burs derives its unusual shape from the fact that it was built in stages. The nave is the oldest part of the church, dating from the early 13th century. The large tower was built in the middle of the same century, while the un-proportionally large Gothic choir was built a century later, replacing an earlier Romanesque choir and apse.[1]

Externally, the church is noteworthy not least for its choir portal. The doorway displays Gothic sculptures depicting a blessing Christ, apostles and saints, as well as a large frieze spanning the whole of the portal, depicting the Parable of the Ten Virgins. The choir, and hence the choir portal, was probably built by a stonemasons' workshop sometimes referred to as Master Egypticus. The same workshop probably made an unusual, very elaborate carved limestone bench inside the church, on which traces of original paint are still visible.[1]

The interior is spacious and airy. Of furnishings, the altarpiece deserves special mention. It is an unusually accomplished work of art made in Lübeck[2] or northern Germany during the first half of the 15th century. The church also has a triumphal cross from the 13th century, traces of medieval stained glass paintings and several pieces if furnishings which are later, dating from the 18th century.[1]

The church was thoroughly renovated in 1960-1964.[1]

An early photo of the Burs Church

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Lagerlöf, Erland (1973). Lagerlöf, Erland, ed. Gotlands kyrkor (in Swedish). Uddevalla: Rabén & Sjögren. pp. 110–112. ISBN 9129410355. 
  2. ^ "Kyrkan". burs.nu (in Swedish). Retrieved 14 August 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Lagerlöf, Erland; Stolt, Bengt (1970). Burs kyrka. Sveriges kyrkor, konsthistoriskt inventarium (in Swedish, with summary in English) 115. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell. pp. 5–79. Retrieved 28 June 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 57°14′44″N 18°30′31″E / 57.24556°N 18.50861°E / 57.24556; 18.50861