University of St Andrews School of Medicine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Bute Medical School)
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 56°20′17″N 2°47′38″W / 56.338°N 2.794°W / 56.338; -2.794

University of St Andrews School of Medicine
University of St Andrews coat of arms.svg
Established 1450
Type Medical school
Dean Prof. R. Hugh MacDougall
Pro Dean (Undergraduate) Prof David Sinclair
Admin. staff 54
Students 464[1]
Location St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
Colours
                                 
Affiliations University of St Andrews
Website medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk

The University of St Andrews School of Medicine (formerly the Bute Medical School) is the school of medicine at the University of St Andrews in St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. The School of Medicine is ranked 8th in the UK by the Times Good University Guide Subject Tables 2013. Admission is very competitive, with an acceptance rate of 17.2% in 2012-13. The yield rate, also known as the matriculation rate is 68% for the 2012-13 admissions year. According to the Guardian University Guide 2013, St Andrews requires the 6th highest entry grades in the UK. The medical school teaches pre-clinical medicine with students completing clinical teaching at different medical schools in the UK.

The school is associated with 1 Nobel Prize and 2 Victoria Cross winners.

History[edit]

The early medical school[edit]

Medicine was the third subject to be taught at St Andrews University, at St Salvator's College and later the United College of St Salvator and St Leonard. Bishop Kennedy founded St Salvator's College in 1450, confirmed by a Papal Bull in 1458.

From the 17th to the 19th centuries, medical degrees from St Andrews were awarded by an early version of distance learning. The university awarded the degree of MD to individuals who were usually already established in medical practice, the first being conferred in 1696. This degree was awarded on the basis of a testimonial written by a supervisor, and a fee was paid to the university. The whole process was conducted through the post, and the candidate did not have to visit the university. Recipients of the MD at this time include the infamous French Revolutionary, Jean-Paul Marat (1743–1793), who obtained his MD in 1775 for an essay on gonorrhea, and Edward Jenner (1749–1823), who developed the first smallpox vaccine, and was awarded the MD in 1792.

In 1721, whilst Chancellor of the University, James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos established the Chandos Chair of Medicine and Anatomy, to fund the appointment of a Professor of Medicine and Anatomy at the university, and Thomas Simson was appointed as the first Chandos Professor. The Chandos Chair still exists, although it has now become a chair of physiology.

In the early 19th century, examinations were introduced. Students had to visit St Andrews to sit them, but there was no teaching at the university.

The founding of the Bute Medical School[edit]

In 1897, as Rector of the University of St Andrews, the 3rd Marquess of Bute, in addition to his provident restorations of other university buildings, initiated the construction of the current Bute Medical Buildings, south of St Mary's College, completed in 1899. The buildings, much added to and modified, especially after a gift from Andrew Carnegie, built labs to the north (now the Carnegie Building). These provided for the establishment of a regular medical school, which both taught and examined medical students. The 3rd Marquess of Bute also provided for the establishment of a new chair of medicine—the Bute Chair of Medicine.

Bute Medical Building

The St Andrews-Dundee course[edit]

In 1898, the University of St Andrews created the University College Dundee. Together, the Bute Medical School and clinical facilities at University College Dundee formed a conjoint medical school. Medical students could either undertake their pre-clinical teaching at the Bute Medical School in St Andrews or go straight to Dundee for their pre-clinical years, and then the two groups combined to complete their clinical training in Dundee. Students were awarded the degree of MB ChB by the University of St Andrews.

In 1954, University College Dundee changed its name to Queen's College, but remained part of the University of St Andrews.

In August 1967, following recommendations by the Robbins Report, the Universities (Scotland) Act 1966 came into force. This granted independent university status to the University of Dundee, separating Queen's College from the University of St Andrews. In many respects, the medical school at the University of Dundee inherited the medical traditions of St Andrews University.

As the clinical medical school (along with other parts of the University of St Andrews including the Law faculty) had been based in Dundee, this left St Andrews with no clinical medical school or teaching hospital. The Universities (Scotland) Act 1966 also removed the University of St Andrews's right to award undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in medicine, including the MB ChB and MD. However, the right to award the MD (St Andrews) has since been restored.

The link with Manchester Medical School[edit]

In order to continue to be able to teach medicine, St Andrews therefore established a new link with the English University of Manchester, in 1970 which was at that time seeking to enlarge its medical school. Students completed a three-year BSc in medical science at St Andrews, and could optionally complete an extra intercalated year for the award of BSc Hons at St Andrews, before completing their clinical training at the University of Manchester, with the final MB ChB awarded by Manchester.

For a brief period there was the option of completing clinical training at Keele University Medical School in Stoke-on-Trent, and around twenty St Andrews graduates each year between 2002–2006 have gone to Keele University. This option no longer exists.

Recent History[edit]

Major changes to the curriculum were made in 2000 with increased emphasis on psychology and cellular biology, with the introduction of a two year course in cellular and molecular medicine and a three year course in behavioural sciences. Further curriculum changes took place in 2004, with a reduction in the amount of teaching but the introduction of a research project into the final year, allowing for an honours degree to be attained after three years' study, and therefore since September 2005, the Bute Medical School has offered a Bachelor of Science with honours in Medical Science (BSc Hons Med Sci).

Course structure[edit]

Phase 1 — Pre-Clinical Years[edit]

Teaching methods include lectures and practical classes, utilising self-directed learning and case-based learning. Examination methods include multiple-choice questions, short answers, and essays in written exams and OSPEs (Objective Structured Practical Exam). A research project is also required for completion of the honours degree—normally undertaken in third year of study.

A further three years' study is required to receive a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MB, ChB), and requires training at a university that supports a clinical course—this extra training is known as phase 2. The course therefore takes an extra year in comparison to other Scottish universities.

Phase 2 — Clinical Years[edit]

In 2004, Prof. Sir Kenneth Calman's report into medical education recommended that medical graduates from St Andrews should remain in Scotland to complete their clinical medical education, and arising out of this, discussions about a link with University of Edinburgh have taken place.

The Board for Academic Medicine under Sir David Carter was established and tasked with, amongst other things, the implementation of these plans. Sir David Carter, Professor Hugh MacDougall (Dean of Medicine) and Professor Simon Guild (Director of Teaching, Depute Head of School) surveyed the capacity of other medical schools to accept St Andrews medical students.

For the 2012 cohort it is expected that the students who are allocated a "Scottish Route" place will be divided as follows:

This began with a phased introduction of the students starting their St Andrews careers in 2007, with 55 progressing to the Scottish medical schools. This number has only risen marginally.

A remainder of 80 students would continue to go to the University of Manchester. Students choosing Manchester will be allocated to one of its four teaching hospitals. Every student accepted to St Andrews is guaranteed a place for their clinical years at one of the 4 Scottish schools or Manchester.

Each year, a group of students apply to complete their studies at the University of Cambridge. Spaces are limited and are allocated based on the student's academic and extracurricular achievements prior to application and an interview held in February.

Students with an interest in academic medicine sometimes choose to pursue an MRes or PhD prior to continuing to a clinical school.

Postgraduate[edit]

In 2002 the Scottish Parliament passed the University of St Andrews (Postgraduate Medical Degrees) Act 2002 which re-instated the university's right to award the postgraduate research degree of Medicinae Doctor (MD) to students who have completed two years of full-time or up to 5 years of part-time research, which had been removed by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1966. The first MD since 1967 was awarded in 2004.

Facilities—New Medical and Biological Sciences Building[edit]

New Medical School

The University of St Andrews’ new Medical and Biological Sciences Building brings together the medical school (relocated from the Bute Building), biologists, physicists and chemists, while also linking to the School of Physics and Astronomy via a first-floor bridge—making it one of the first medical schools in the UK to fully integrate research facilities across the sciences.

The School, which has been built at a cost of £45m, contains state-of-the-art research laboratory space, as well as modern teaching facilities and a large lecture theatre. The new building allows for extensive inter-disciplinary medical research and is unique in the fact that it is physically linked to the Faculty of Science buildings.

Opening the building on Friday 12 November 2010, the First Minister Alex Salmond said:

“The University of St Andrews has a long, proud tradition in educational excellence and this £45 million state-of-the-art facility will bring together students across all science disciplines to create a rich collaborative environment. "Scotland’s scientists and researchers have made an immense contribution to shaping the modern world and this new facility will strengthen this reputation. It will not only attract new undergraduates to the University, educating our next generation of doctors, but will establish a hub for the creation of new medical research and breakthroughs. “This new building will be one of the first UK medical schools where research facilities are integrated across the sciences and this opening demonstrates how Scotland's oldest University remains at the forefront of innovation.”

The First Minister marked the occasion by unveiling a commemorative, meagre stump in the building’s courtyard. He was joined by Chancellor Sir Menzies Campbell MP, Principal and Vice Chancellor Professor Louise Richardson, Master of the United College Professor Neville Richardson, Dean of Medicine and Head of the School of Medicine Professor Hugh MacDougall, and Acting Head of the School of Biology Professor Mike Ritchie.

Medical Societies[edit]

Over recent years, many medical societies have been developed, alongside the historical Bute Medical Society, to help incorporate the clinical aspects into the course—one which was traditionally science based only. These societies include Surgical, Clinical and a Medsin group.

The Bute Medical Society[edit]

Bute Medical School Scarf

The Bute Medical Society was founded in 1915, by its first president Margaret Shirlaw, with the support of Miss Mildred Clark, Calum McCrimmon, Clive Mackie Whyte, Cecily Thistlewaite, Mary Ellison and W.G. Robertson. The initial aim of the society was to hold clinically oriented lectures that the students could attend voluntarily. This tradition still continues today with the society's bimonthly 'cheese and wine' evening. As an independent, non-profit organisation it is still run entirely by medical students. It is sponsored by the British Medical Association, Medical Protection Society, Medical Defence Union and Salford Student Homes. Fund raising events held throughout the year also enable the Society to contribute to charities.

Medsin[edit]

Medsin is a network of students with an interest in health, with branches at universities across the UK. Medsin's Activities aim to promote health as well as to act upon and educate students about health inequalities in our local and global communities. In St Andrews therefore, Medsin acts as an umbrella society, supporting new start-up projects.

Projects include StopAids Campaign, Teddy Bear Hospital, Climate Change Awareness, and the Global Health Education Project (GHEP)

Malawi and The Global Health Education Project (GHEP)[edit]

The Global Health Education Project (GHEP) is an initiative set up within the School of Medicine at the University of St Andrews, independently by young, full-time medical students who collectively have interests in improving healthcare and education of medicine across the world.

In 2008 the society was partially established with the aims of developing such interests, raising awareness of global health, and tackling issues that may hinder improvements in both education and deliverance of healthcare across the developing world.

Currently the project is heavily involved in establishing an exchange programme with the Malawian College of Medicine, taking full advantage of the University's long history in the country. Endorsed by the University of St Andrews, the Scottish SNP Government and Members of Parliament in the UK, the project has grown rapidly since its founding in 2008, and has now more than 200 members and an active committee.

Ten students have visited the Malawian College of Medicine in July 2011 as part of a GHEP group, forming part also of the first ever University of St Andrews medical exchange.

Global Health Education Project

The relationship between the University of St Andrews and the Malawian College of Medicine is over twenty years old. The College was founded upon the basis of previous medical training at St Andrews and many of the graduates of Medicine and of Health Care Management now hold the highest clinical and governmental positions in Malawi.

A Memorandum of Understanding between the Bute Medical School staff and the College of Medicine was signed in March 2008, which outlines a collaboration between the two institutions over curriculum reform, curriculum support through improved infrastructure and IT resources and research networking and support. GHEP is however an entirely student run programme.

Other project activities include the running of Global Health Education Workshops/Module, which 2010 attracted more than 200 students, staff and visitors from the world of medicine and further afield. Titles covered included climate change, overpopulation, epidemics and elimination and the concept of good aid.

Surgical Society[edit]

In 2009, a small group of students set up the University's first surgical interest society. Since then, a multitude of lectures, skills workshops and anatomy revision tutorials have been run by the society and it continues to grow in size. The Robert Walmsley Lecture was created in 2011 as a yearly event held in the old Bute Buildings to commemorate this previous setting of the teaching of medicine in St Andrews; the inaugural lecture was delivered by Dr David Sinclair.

Research[edit]

Research at the school is grouped into three main areas: People and Populations, Molecular Medicine and Medical Photonics. Much of the research is interdisciplinary especially in medical photonics were close links with the School of Physics exist. There are groups involved in child health and development, cell signaling, cancer, neurobiology, infection, cell biology and molecular psychiatry.

Academic Dress[edit]

St Andrews undergraduate medical students are members of the United College of St Salvator and St Leonard, and as such wear the scarlet gown with burgundy velvet collar for official academic occasions. They graduate as a BSc or BSc (Hons) and so wear a black gown with a fuchsia hood trimmed with white fur. On graduation from Manchester they are entitled to wear a black gown with scarlet hood trimmed with white fur, and black cap.

When postgraduate students graduate with the MD degree, they wear a black gown with a crimson hood with a white lining, alternatively they may wear a crimson gown.

Alumni[edit]

Medical students at the University of St Andrews have included:

Name Class year Notability Reference(s)
John Arbuthnot MD 1696 Physician in ordinary to Queen Anne, member of the Scriblerus Club, inventor of the figure of John Bull
Robert Whytt MA 1730, MD 1737 President of the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh, wrote book on diseases of the nervous system
William Wright MD 1763 President of the London Royal School of Medicine, Physician in Chief of Jamaica, the genus Wrightia (Apocynaceae) are named after him
Andrew Duncan MA 1762, MD 1769 President of the Royal Medical Society and the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh, First physician to the King in Scotland, founder of the Harveian Society, founder of the first lunatic asylum in Edinburgh
Jean-Paul Marat MD 1775 Radical pro-revolutionary journalist during the French Revolution
Edward Jenner MD 1792 Discovered the smallpox vaccine
Richard Poole MD 1805 Editor of the New Edinburgh Review, the Phrenological Journal and Encyclopædia Edinensis
Duncan McNeill, 1st Baron Colonsay MD 1809 Lord President of the Court of Session of Scotland, MP for Argyllshire
Anthony Brownless MD 1846 Founder of the University of Melbourne Medical School
Samuel Cockburn MD 1848 Scottish physician, outspoken defender of homeopathy
Anthony Dickson Home MD 1848 Scottish physician, Surgeon General of the British Army, recipient of the Victoria Cross [2]
Thomas Egerton Hale MD 1855 Scottish physician, Surgeon Major of the British Army, recipient of the Victoria Cross
Joseph Bancroft MD 1859 surgeon and parasitologist, discovered filariasis, made advances in leprosy
George Turner Orton MD 1860 Liberal-Conservative MP of Canada for Wellington Centre
John Young Bown MD 1863 Liberal-Conservative MP of Canada for Brant North
Stewart Duke-Elder BSc 1919, MA (Hons) 1919, MB ChB 1923, MD 1925, DSc 1927, LLD (Hon) 1950 Surgeon Oculist to King Edward VIII, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth II, Brigadier General in the Royal Army Medical Corps, author of the widely used textbooks Textbook of Ophthalmology and System of Ophthalmology, Founder of the Institute of Ophthalmology in London and the Faculty of Ophthalmologists, Hospitaller of the St John Ophthalmic Hospital, President of the International Council of Ophthalmology
Sir Douglas Black MB ChB 1943 Author of the Black Report; former President of the Royal College of Physicians
Walter Perry MB ChB 1943, MD 1948, DSc 1958 Dean of Medicine of the University of Edinburgh Medical School, First Vice-Chancellor of the Open University, Life Peer of the House of Lords
Sir James Black MB ChB 1946 Inventor of Propanolol; Developer of Cimetidine and Ranitidine; Nobel Prize in Medicine winner; Chancellor of the University of Dundee
Lord Patel MB ChB 1964 Chancellor of the University of Dundee
Gordon Ritchie MB ChB Progressive Conservative MP of Canada for Dauphin
John Garrow MD, PhD Chairman of HealthWatch, editor of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Faculty[edit]

List includes faculty who were not also graduates of the medical school

Name Department Notability Reference
Percy Theodore Herring Chandos Chair of Medicine and Physiology 1908-1948, FRSE 1916 Scottish physician, discovered herring bodies

The Bute Chair[edit]

The Bute Chair was established by John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute in 1898.

Holders of the Bute Chair are known as Bute Professors and include:

  • 1901–1914 James Musgrove
  • 1914–1946 David Waterston
  • 1946–1973 Robert Walmsley
  • 1973–1996 David Brynmor Thomas
  • 2003–present Robert Hugh MacDougall

Sir James Black Chair of Medicine[edit]

In 2010 the Bute Medical School of the University of St Andrews, where Black had studied his initial degree in medicine, unveiled that an honorary 'Sir James Black Chair of Medicine' would be created. This post remained unfilled for the reminder of the academic year 2009–2010. In September 2010 the first Chair of Medicine at the ancient University was given to Professor Stephen H Gillespie MD, DSc, FRCP (Edin), FRC Path, leaving his post as Professor of Medical Microbiology at UCL.

The John Reid Chair of Pathology[edit]

In 2012 the Bute Medical School of the University of St Andrews, appointed Prof. David Harrison to the John Reid Chair of Pathology, leaving his previous post as the Head of Division of Pathology in the University of Edinburgh. He remains an Honorary Consultant Pathologist in Lothian University Hospitals Division and Director of the Breakthrough Research Unit, Edinburgh.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "UCAS stats". Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Anthony Dickson Home". Retrieved 15 November 2013. 

External links[edit]