Byram Township, New Jersey

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Byram Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Byram
Motto: "The Township of Lakes"[1]
Map of Byram Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Byram Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Byram Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Byram Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°57′36″N 74°42′48″W / 40.960099°N 74.713361°W / 40.960099; -74.713361Coordinates: 40°57′36″N 74°42′48″W / 40.960099°N 74.713361°W / 40.960099; -74.713361[2][3]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Sussex
Formed February 5, 1798
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act Council-Manager
 • Mayor James Oscovitch (term ends December 31, 2017)
 • Manager Joe Sabatini[4]
 • Clerk Doris Flynn[4]
Area[3]
 • Total 22.262 sq mi (57.659 km2)
 • Land 21.073 sq mi (54.579 km2)
 • Water 1.189 sq mi (3.080 km2)  5.34%
Area rank 123rd of 566 in state
11th of 24 in county[3]
Elevation[6] 1,053 ft (321 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 8,350
 • Estimate (2013[10]) 8,162
 • Rank 274th of 566 in state
5th of 24 in county[11]
 • Density 396.2/sq mi (153.0/km2)
 • Density rank 460th of 566 in state
11th of 24 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07874 - Stanhope[12]
Area code(s) 862/973
FIPS code 3403709160[13][3][14]
GNIS feature ID 0882263[15][3]
Website www.byramtwp.org

Byram Township — "The Township of Lakes"[1] — is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,350,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 96 (+1.2%) from the 8,254 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 206 (+2.6%) from the 8,048 counted in the 1990 Census.[16]

Byram Center (with a 2010 Census population of 90[17]) is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community located within Byram Township. Lake Mohawk (with 1,824 out of the CDP's total 2010 Census population of 9,916 in the township[18]) is a CDP split between Byram Township and Sparta Township.[19][20][21]

History[edit]

Byram Township was created by an act by the New Jersey General Assembly on February 5, 1798, from portions of the now-defunct Newton Township, and was incorporated on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships.[22][23] Byram Township was named in honor of patriarch Jephthah Byram and his family, who are believed to have emigrated to the area after the American Revolutionary War.[22] Before being named Byram, the community had been called Lockwood. In fact, the Lockwood Tavern still holds this as evidence. In 1829, a section of Green Township was incorporated into the township.[23] Portions of the township have been taken to form Sparta Township (April 14, 1845), Brooklyn borough (March 24, 1898, now called Hopatcong) and Stanhope borough (March 24, 1904).[23]

There are many historical sites located in Byram. The Roseville Schoolhouse, built in 1853, was recently moved from its original location on Lackawanna Drive to Mansfield Drive.[24] The Leport House, built in 1802, is Byram's oldest remaining house.[25] The house is located right by the Byram General Store on Sparta-Stanhope Road. The Lockwood Cemetery, Byram's most recognizable cemetery, was established circa 1818. The cemetery consists of about 30 gravestones, with slight remnants of the foundation of a church.

In 1911, the Lackawanna Cut-Off rail line opened through Byram Township, with a station stop near the current Forest Lakes neighborhood. The Cut-Off was part of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad's mainline from Hoboken, New Jersey to Buffalo, New York. The railroad was important in providing transportation for mines in Northern Jersey. It passes through Byram for a long distance. It runs mainly along Roseville, but as Roseville veers north, the tracks still head West. The line was abandoned in 1980 and the tracks were removed four years later. There is a proposal to reactivate passenger service via New Jersey Transit in the future.

In 2001, then-mayor Richard Bowe called for an investigation of weather forecasters due to a snowstorm that had been forecast but never materialized, arguing that forecasters should be held responsible for the "excessive overtime costs" that the township experienced and for losses of local businesses shut in advance of the predicted snowfall.[26]

Mining[edit]

Byram Township had a very large mining industry in the past. There are so many mineral mines in Byram that there is one almost walking distance from anywhere. The biggest mine, The Roseville Mine, is located on the current Roseville Road. The mine is in a quadrilateral plot of land, with the southwestern corner created by Roseville Road and Amity Road. The southeastern corner is created by an intersection between Roseville Road and the Lackawanna Cut-off. The Roseville Mine was first excavated in the early 1850s. It was well worked during its life, with production in 1880 alone documented as 67,000 tons. Most of the work was done via a large open cut. This cut as it exists today, is water filled, however its massive size was impressive, its vertical walls being probably over 80 to 90 feet high. Another popular mine is the Charlotte Uranium mine. The mine extracted uranium from the rocks of southwestern Byram. The mine closed in the 1950s, but many remnants are still visible.

Geography[edit]

Byram Township is located at 40°57′36″N 74°42′48″W / 40.960099°N 74.713361°W / 40.960099; -74.713361 (40.960099,-74.713361). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 22.262 square miles (57.659 km2), of which, 21.073 square miles (54.579 km2) of it was land and 1.189 square miles (3.080 km2) of it (5.34%) was water.[2][3] It is divided into several sections. They include the neighborhoods of Forest West, East and West Brookwood, Forest Lakes, Lackawanna, Cranberry Lake, and the Lake Mohawk area.

The township is known as the "Township of Lakes" because of the community's nearly two dozen lakes and ponds.[1]

Streams
  • Lubbers Run runs through the township, intersecting Mansfield Drive. The run is monitored monthly by the Byram Intermediate School's Environmental Club.
  • Punkhorn Creek runs through the township, flowing southwest from Lake Bottom, on the north side of and parallel with Amity Road, to Roseville Pond.

Residents of Byram are served by adjacent post offices in Stanhope, Andover Township and Sparta Township.[27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 1,153
1850 1,340 * 16.2%
1860 1,202 −10.3%
1870 1,332 10.8%
1880 1,406 5.6%
1890 1,380 −1.8%
1900 1,235 * −10.5%
1910 1,055 * −14.6%
1920 409 −61.2%
1930 245 −40.1%
1940 373 52.2%
1950 761 104.0%
1960 1,616 112.4%
1970 4,592 184.2%
1980 7,502 63.4%
1990 8,048 7.3%
2000 8,254 2.6%
2010 8,350 1.2%
Est. 2013 8,162 [10] −2.3%
Population sources:
1840-1920[28] 1840[29] 1850-1870[30]
1850[31] 1870[32] 1880-1890[33]
1890-1910[34] 1910-1930[35]
1930-1990[36] 2000[37][38] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[23]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,350 people, 2,926 households, and 2,361 families residing in the township. The population density was 396.2 per square mile (153.0/km2). There were 3,207 housing units at an average density of 152.2 per square mile (58.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.35% (7,878) White, 1.47% (123) Black or African American, 0.12% (10) Native American, 2.14% (179) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.62% (52) from other races, and 1.28% (107) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.99% (417) of the population.[7]

There were 2,926 households, of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.3% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.3% were non-families. 14.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.19.[7]

In the township, 25.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 24.3% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.2 years. For every 100 females there were 101.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.1 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $103,519 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,758) and the median family income was $113,555 (+/- $12,281). Males had a median income of $78,347 (+/- $7,621) versus $54,504 (+/- $5,146) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $43,160 (+/- $3,087). About 0.8% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 2.6% of those age 65 or over.[39]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[13] there were 8,254 people, 2,833 households, and 2,317 families residing in the township. The population density was 391.8 people per square mile (151.3/km²). There were 3,078 housing units at an average density of 146.1 per square mile (56.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 95.77% White, 0.97% African American, 0.06% Native American, 1.41% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.64% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.94% of the population.[37][38]

There were 2,833 households out of which 43.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.9% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.2% were non-families. 13.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.24.[37][38]

In the township the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 32.4% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 6.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.4 males.[37][38]

The median income for a household in the township was $81,532, and the median income for a family was $89,500. Males had a median income of $59,722 versus $40,396 for females. The per capita income for the township was $30,710. About 0.9% of families and 1.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 1.1% of those age 65 or over.[37][38]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Township of Byram is chartered under the Faulkner Act Council-Manager plan. Byram Township has a Mayor and four Council Members. The Mayor and all Council Members are elected on an at-large basis in nonpartisan elections for four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two seats (including the mayoral seat) or three seats up for election in odd-numbered years as part of the November general election, with terms beginning on January 1.[5][40] In August 2010, the township became the first in the state to shift its non-partisan elections from May to November as part of an effort to raise turnout and cut costs by combining the municipal election with the November general election, with the first election under the new cycle taking place in November 2011.[41][42]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Byram Township is James Oscovitch, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2017. Members of the Byram Township Council are David Gray (2015), Nisha Kash (2015), Scott Olson (2015) and Marie Raffay (2017).[43][44][45]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Byram Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[8][47][48]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[50][51] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[52][53]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[54][55] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[56] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[57]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[58] As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),[59] Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),[60] Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[61] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016)[62] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[63][58] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[64] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),[65] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016)[66] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[67][64] The County Administrator is John Eskilson.[68][69]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,805 registered voters in Byram Township, of which 1,128 (19.4% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,957 (33.7% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 2,714 (46.8% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 6 voters registered to other parties.[70] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 69.5% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 93.6% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[70][71]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 2,373 votes here (60.5% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,464 votes (37.3% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 78 votes (2.0% vs. 2.1%), among the 3,923 ballots cast by the township's 5,883 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.7% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[72] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,693 votes here (59.6% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,728 votes (38.3% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 76 votes (1.7% vs. 1.5%), among the 4,517 ballots cast by the township's 5,735 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.8% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[73] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,727 votes here (62.6% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,558 votes (35.8% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 56 votes (1.3% vs. 1.3%), among the 4,353 ballots cast by the township's 5,371 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.0% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[74]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,971 votes here (65.4% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 715 votes (23.7% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 286 votes (9.5% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 35 votes (1.2% vs. 1.3%), among the 3,016 ballots cast by the township's 5,708 registered voters, yielding a 52.8% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[75]

Education[edit]

The Byram Township School District serves public school students in Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 1,024 students and 82.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.41:1.[76] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[77]) are Byram Lakes Elementary School[78] serves grades K - 4 (526 students) and Byram Township Intermediate School [79] serves grades 5 - 8 (498 students).[80]

For public school students in ninth through twelfth grades, the township shares Lenape Valley Regional High School, which also serves Netcong in Morris County and the Sussex County community of Stanhope.[81] As of the 2010-11 school year, the school had an enrollment of 743 students.[82]

The Consolidated School,a former public school building that had previously been used by the school district for students in Kindergarten through second grade, has been leased to a private special needs school named Celebrate the Children.[83]

Private schools in the area include Reverend Brown in Sparta for grades K-8. Hilltop Country Day School, which also serves K-8, also has students from Byram. Byram has students in various private high schools, but all but one school are located outside of Sussex County. Pope John XXIII Regional High School, in Sparta Township, is the location of the only private high school in Sussex County, which has around 10 students from Byram.

Recreation[edit]

Trails and hiking[edit]

Byram Township is known as the "Gateway to New Jersey Trails".[84]

Sussex Branch Trail extends 21.2 miles from Netcong to Branchville, following the route of the old Sussex Branch Railroad. This line was in service under various ownerships from 1848 - 1966. Today trail users can explore the route once used by steam locomotives and long freight trains.[85]

Parks[edit]

The township has several municipal parks:[86]

  • C.O. Johnson Park, named for a former Byram mayor of about 25 years' tenure, has a football field, baseball field, tennis court, skateboard park, bocce court, and a track for walking. It has restrooms, a refreshment/snack area, and a picnic area with five tables with attached benches and two handicapped-accessible tables.[87]
  • Riverside Park is at the intersection of River Road and Waterloo Road in Byram Township. Opened in late summer 2001, it is Byram's newest park. The park has the Musconetcong River running right behind it and features walking paths, fishing and canoeing. The park has a playground, picnic tables, a gazebo and basketball courts.[87]
  • Tomahawk Park is a small park located on Tomahawk Trail in Byram Township. It is across from Tomahawk Lake.
  • Parts of Allamuchy Mountain State Park are in the township, with the park accessible via state trails.[88]
  • Neil Gylling Memorial Park has two softball fields. A soccer field is also set up between the softball fields during the fall season. There are also two tennis courts. This is the traditional location for Byram Day which is celebrated the 2nd Saturday in September of every year.[87]
  • Brookwood Park is a small park that contains a basketball court in East Brookwood.[87]

Waterloo Village[edit]

Waterloo Village used to exhibit many time periods from a 400-year-old Lenape (Delaware) Native American village to a bustling port along the once prosperous Morris Canal. The early 19th-century village contained a working mill with gristmills and sawmills, a general store, a blacksmith shop and restored houses. Classical and popular music programs are available to the public during the summer months. Waterloo Village was shut down to preserve the artifacts inside, though plans have been made to restore the buildings on the site.[89]

Transportation[edit]

The township had a total of 62.35 miles (100.34 km) of roadways, of which 45.40 miles (73.06 km) are maintained by the municipality, 12.34 miles (19.86 km) by Sussex County and 4.61 miles (7.42 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[90]

The township is bisected by U.S. Route 206. A small portion of Interstate 80 passes through the southern tip of Byram Township but without any interchanges.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Byram Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c FAQ, Byram Township. Accessed July 1, 2011. "Byram Township is located in Northern New Jersey in Sussex County. Byram is known as The Township of Lakes, having more than two dozen lakes and ponds. Several large communities have grown around the larger lakes."
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Manager / Clerk / Registrar, Byram Township. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Byram, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Byram township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Byram township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Stanhope, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  13. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  14. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 27, 2012.
  15. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  17. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Byram Center CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  18. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Lake Mohawk CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  19. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 19, 2013.
  20. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 19, 2013.
  21. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed February 19, 2013.
  22. ^ a b Byram Township History, Byram Township. Accessed June 13, 2007. "Byram Township was established on February 5, 1798, having been separated from the vast area that was then Newton. The name honored the Byram Family, surveyors who had settled in the area before the Revolution. In 1798, the head of the family was Jephthah Byram, who is buried in the Sparta Cemetary [sic]."
  23. ^ a b c d Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 229. Accessed October 25, 2012. A date of April 9, 1798 is shown as the date the township was formed, which appears to be incorrect, as the township was incorporated some six weeks earlier.
  24. ^ Roseville Schoolhouse Museum, accessed February 12, 2007.
  25. ^ Album Name: Leport House dedication & Kiddie Karaoke, New Jersey Herald, May 13, 2006.
  26. ^ via Associated Press. "N.J. mayor wants investigation into snowstorm", USA Today, March 8, 2001. Accessed April 9, 2013. "Byram Township Mayor Richard Bowe, who is an attorney, is calling for a federal or state investigation in an attempt to determine if the forecasts of heavy snow and blizzard conditions were mistakes or a deliberate attempt to generate ratings."
  27. ^ Services » Contacts: Post Offices, Byram Township. Accessed July 2, 2011.
  28. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  29. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 19, 2013.
  30. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 271, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 19, 2013. "Byram is in the extreme southern part of the county, on Hopatcong lake, and contained in 1850, 1,340 inhabitants; in 1860, 1,202; and in 1870, 1,332."
  31. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 11, 2013.
  32. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 11, 2013. Total shown for Bridgewater is 5,883, including 556 in Bound Brook, 1,009 in Raritan and 2,236 in Somerville. Total shown was calculated via subtraction.
  33. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  34. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  35. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  36. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  37. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Byram township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  38. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Byram township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  39. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Byram township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  40. ^ Town Hall » Government, Byram Township. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  41. ^ Moszczynski, Joe. "Vernon voters to decide on new form of government where mayor would assume new powers", The Star-Ledger, October 3, 2010. Accessed February 18, 2013. "In Byram, the council voted in August to move its elections from May to November in an effort to cut costs and increase voter turnout."
  42. ^ Moszczynski, Joe. "N.J. municipalities consider moving non-partisan elections from May to November", The Star-Ledger, September 26, 2010. Accessed July 28, 2014. "Byram, in Sussex County, became the first municipality in the state to make the change, on Aug. 30, after the township council voted 3-2 to approve the move, which will take effect in November 2011, when three council seats will be up for grabs."
  43. ^ Town Hall » Township Council, Byram Township. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  44. ^ Byram Faulkner Election May 12, 2009, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date May 13, 2009. Accessed February 13, 2013.
  45. ^ Summary Report - Group detail / General Election November 8, 2011, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 10, 2011. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  46. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  52. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  53. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
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  55. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
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  60. ^ Dennis J. Mudrick, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
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  83. ^ Stewart, Amy. "Seats open on Bryam Steering Committee", The Township Journal, February 15, 2008. Accessed July 2, 2011. "Looking at the municipal buildings that already exist will be part of the process. These include the civic center, formally the consolidated school. The use of that building on Lackawanna Drive periodically comes into question since a large portion of the building is rented to Celebrate the Children, a school run privately for children with educational disabilities, mainly autism."
  84. ^ Parks & Recreation » Trails, Byram Township. Accessed July 2, 2011.
  85. ^ Paulinskill & Sussex Branch Trails, Liberty Water Gap Trail. Accessed July 2, 2011. "The Sussex Branch Trail follows a section of the route of the former Sussex Branch line of the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad that extends through Sussex County from Byram Township in the south to Branchville Borough.... Located in Sussex County, the trail follows a 20-mile route beginning from the north at the Frankford Township-Branchville Borough boundary, and continues south through Lafayette Township, Andover Township, and Andover Borough to its southern terminus in Byram Township at Waterloo Road."
  86. ^ Parks & Recreation » Parks, Byram Township. Accessed July 2, 2011.
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  89. ^ Bouchal, Lyndsay Cayetana. "Supporters plan rebirth for Waterloo Village", New Jersey Herald, April 11, 2010. Accessed July 2, 2011.
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  91. ^ Falkenstein, Michelle. "A Festival For the Band Next Door", The New York Times, April 24, 2005. Accessed October 23, 2007. "Nevertheless, Mr. Freeman, 24, who is from Byram, says he is excited to do a show next weekend."

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