CADAM

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For Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing in general, see CAD/CAM.
CADAM
Developer(s) Dassault Systemes
Stable release CADAM Drafting V5R19 SP1 / October 29, 2008
Operating system AIX, HP-UX, SGI-[IRIX], SunOS, Windows, MS-DOS
Website www.cadam.com

CADAM (Computer-Augmented Design And Manufacturing) is a CAD-related product that was developed by Lockheed. CADAM is/was software originally written for IBM mainframes and later ported to UNIX workstations. A variant of CADAM called Micro CADAM was also developed, which also ran on PCs under DOS.

History[edit]

  • 1977: IBM agreed to sell CADAM to aerospace companies.
  • 1981: CADAM Release 18.3 was released. It provided support for IBM mainframes running VM/CMS.
  • 1983: CADAM Inc is formed as a subsidiary of Lockheed Corp.
  • 1985: CADAM Inc successfully sued Adage over the CADAM look-and-feel. It was one of the first look-and-feel court cases.
  • 1987: CADAM Inc and SDRC won a massive GM C4 benchmark. CADAM agreed to port Professional CADAM to Sun, Apollo and HP.
  • 1989: CADAM Inc was sold to IBM. CADAM Inc, an IBM Company, was formed.
  • 1990: Microcadam was formed. CADAM Inc developed and enhanced CADAM (mainframes) and Professional CADAM (workstations). Microcadam developed Micro CADAM. Professional CADAM was ported to IBM RS/6000. It was one of the first non-IBM applications for the workstation.
  • 1991: There was a decision in the Soules v. CADAM court case.[1]
  • 1992: IBM sold CADAM Inc to Dassault Systèmes. This entity is called "Dassault Systemes of America" (DSA). DSA maintains mainframe CADAM and Professional CADAM. Altium was created. Altium supported Micro CADAM, P-CAD and IBM CAD.
  • 1993: An old version of Micro CADAM was made available via a free license for use on DOS PCs. Copies of this free version are still available on the internet.
  • 1999/1998: Microcadam became CSC/Microcadam.
  • 2000: Microcadam closed. Dassault Systèmes assumed support for Microcadam software.
  • 2001: Protel took the name Altium. [2]

External links[edit]