CCGS Simon Fraser

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Career (Canada)
Name: Simon Fraser
Namesake: Simon Fraser
Port of registry: Ottawa
Builder: Burrard Dry Dock, Vancouver
Launched: 1960
Commissioned: 1960
Decommissioned: March 2001[1]
Refit: Versatile Marine, Montreal, Québec, 1986
Identification:
Fate: Sold, and currently being converted to yacht
General characteristics [2]
Type: Icebreaking, supply and buoy tender
Tonnage: 1,353 GRT
431 NRT
Length: 62.26 m (204 ft 3 in)
Beam: 12.8 m (42 ft 0 in)
Draft: 4.27 m (14 ft 0 in)
Ice class: 100 A1
Propulsion:
Speed: 13.8 knots (25.6 km/h; 15.9 mph)
Range: 5,000 nmi (9,300 km; 5,800 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph)
Endurance: 20 days
Complement: 24
Aviation facilities: Helicopter deck aft

CCGS Simon Fraser was a buoy tender operated by the Canadian Coast Guard.[4][5][6]

She was built by Burrard Dry Dock in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1960. She was modernized in 1986, at Versatile Marine, Montreal, Quebec. She displaces 1353 gross tons. She was staffed by a crew of 24.

She played a role in searching for wreckage that could show the cause of the crash of Swissair Flight 111.[7]

In 2000 she escorted the Nadon on a transit of the Northwest Passage, which was recreating the historic 1940-42 transit of the RCMP St Roch.[8] The Nadon's transit was a millennium project. This was the Simon Fraser's last voyage prior to her decommissioning.[9]

After her decommissioning the Simon Fraser, and her sister ship the CCGS Tupper, was sold for conversion into a yacht and charter vessel in Italy.[9]

As of June 2012 she is still in drydock at Livorno, Italy, undergoing conversion.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "50th Anniversary - Fleet Additions". Canadian Coast Guard. 2012. Retrieved 24 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "CCGS Simon Fraser Dimensions and Statistics". Canadian Coast Guard. 2012. Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  3. ^ "Navire Simon Fraser Screw, Québec, Canada". waymarking.com. 2012. Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  4. ^ "Ships of the CCG 1850-1967". Canadian Coast Guard. 2008-03-31. Archived from the original on 2009-09-13. 
  5. ^ "Fleet: CCGS Simon Fraser". Canadian Coast Guard. 2008-03-31. Archived from the original on 2009-10-01. 
  6. ^ "Technical: CCGS Simon Fraser". Canadian Coast Guard. 2008-03-31. Archived from the original on 2009-10-01. 
  7. ^ "Media Advisory: Fisheries and Oceans Canada Canadian Coast Guard Coast Guard support for Swiss Air Flight 111 investigation continues". Department of Fisheries and Oceans. 1998-09-06. Archived from the original on 2009-10-01. 
  8. ^ Paul Beesley. "Simon Fraser & Tupper". boatnerd. Archived from the original on 2009-09-26. Retrieved 2009-09-26. 
  9. ^ a b Tom Peters (2006-04-17). "New Life for Old Vessels". Canadian Sailings. Archived from the original on 2009-10-01. 
  10. ^ "Simon Fraser". shipspotting.com. 2012. Retrieved 25 October 2012.