CDIO

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The CDIO Initiative (CDIO is a trademarked initialism for Conceive — Design — Implement — Operate) is an innovative educational framework for producing the next generation of engineers. The framework provides students with an education stressing engineering fundamentals set in the context of Conceiving — Designing — Implementing — Operating real-world systems and products. Throughout the world, CDIO Initiative collaborators have adopted CDIO as the framework of their curricular planning and outcome-based assessment.

Concept[edit]

The CDIO concept was originally conceived at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the late 1990s.[1] In 2000, MIT in collaboration with three Swedish universities - Chalmers University of Technology, Linköping University and the Royal Institute of Technology — formally founded the CDIO Initiative.[2] It became an international collaboration, with universities around the world adopting the same framework.[3]

CDIO collaborators recognize that an engineering education is acquired over a long period and in a variety of institutions, and that educators in all parts of this spectrum can learn from practice elsewhere. The CDIO network therefore welcomes members in a diverse range of institutions ranging from research-led internationally acclaimed universities to local colleges dedicated to providing students with their initial grounding in engineering.

The collaborators maintain a dialogue about what works and what does not and continue to refine the project. Determining additional members of the collaboration is a selective process managed by a Council comprising original members and early adopters.[4]

The CDIO syllabus consists of four parts[5]

  1. Technical knowledge and reasoning
  2. Personal and professional skills
  3. Interpersonal skills
  4. CDIO

Members[edit]

The following institutions collaborate in the CDIO initiative:[6]

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Chile

China

Colombia

Denmark

Finland

France

Germany

Honduras

Iceland

Israel

Italy

Japan

Malaysia

Netherlands

New Zealand

Poland

Portugal

Russia

Singapore

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Tunisia

United Kingdom

United States of America

Vietnam

Sources[edit]

  • Edward Crawley; Johan Malmqvist; Sören Östlund; Doris Brodeur (2007). Rethinking Engineering Education, The CDIO Approach. Springer. ISBN 978-0-387-38287-6. 

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.engsc.ac.uk/er/cdio/index.asp CDIO Retrieved March 29, 2010
  2. ^ "Wallenberg CDIO documents". Archived from the original on March 16, 2005. 
  3. ^ "CDIO Collaborators". Retrieved December 28, 2011. 
  4. ^ http://www.cdio.org/participate/join-cdio-0 Join CDIO Retrieved March 29, 2010
  5. ^ Edward F. Crawley (2002). "Frontiers in Education, 2002. FIE 2002. 32nd Annual". Frontiers in Education 2. IEEE. doi:10.1109/FIE.2002.1158202. ISBN 0-7803-7444-4.  |chapter= ignored (help)
  6. ^ CDIO Collaborators, retrieved March 29, 2010

External links[edit]