CD+G

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CD+G
CDGlogo.svg
Media type Optical disc
Encoding Various
Capacity Typically up to 800 MB (up to 80 minutes audio)
Read mechanism 780 nm wavelength semiconductor laser
Developed by Philips & Sony
Usage Audio, image, and data storage

CD+G (also known as CD-G, CD+Graphics and TV-Graphics[1]) is an extension of the compact disc standard that can present low-resolution graphics alongside the audio data on the disc when played on a compatible device. CD+G discs are often used for karaoke machines, which utilize this functionality to present on-screen lyrics for the song contained on the disc. The CD+G specifications were published by Philips and Sony in an updated revision of the Red Book specifications.[2][3]

The first CD to be released with CD+G graphics was Eat or Be Eaten by Firesign Theatre in 1985.[4] The CD+EG is a similar format that allows for better graphics, but has been used very rarely.[2]

Players[edit]

Along with dedicated Karaoke machines, other consumer devices that play CD+G format CDs include the NEC TurboGrafx-CD (a CD-ROM peripheral for the PC Engine/TurboGrafx-16) and Turbo Duo, the Philips CD-i, the Sega Saturn, Mega-CD, the JVC X'Eye, the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer, the Amiga CD32 and Commodore CDTV, and the Atari Jaguar CD (which was an attachment for the Atari Jaguar). Some CD-ROM drives can also read this data. The Pioneer CLD-A100 "LaserActive" LaserDisc player can also play CD+G discs, as long as either the PAC-S1/S-10 or PAC-N1/N10 game modules are installed.

Since 2003, some standalone DVD players have supported the CD+G format.

Implementation[edit]

The CD+G format takes advantage of the subcode channels R through W, which are unused in standard audio CD formats. These six bits store graphics information.[2]

In the CD+G system, 16-color (4-bit) graphics are displayed on a raster field which is 300×216 pixels in size, of which only the central 288×192 area is used with a flat-coloured border (6 pixels wide, 12 lines high) drawn around it.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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