CELSR2

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Cadherin, EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor 2
Identifiers
Symbols CELSR2 ; CDHF10; EGFL2; Flamingo1; MEGF3
External IDs OMIM604265 MGI1858235 HomoloGene1078 IUPHAR: CELSR2 GeneCards: CELSR2 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE CELSR2 204029 at tn.png
PBB GE CELSR2 36499 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 1952 53883
Ensembl ENSG00000143126 ENSMUSG00000068740
UniProt Q9HCU4 A2AEE7
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001408 NM_001004177
RefSeq (protein) NP_001399 NP_001004177
Location (UCSC) Chr 1:
109.79 – 109.82 Mb
Chr 3:
108.39 – 108.42 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor 2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CELSR2 gene.[1][2]

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the flamingo subfamily, part of the cadherin superfamily. The flamingo subfamily consists of nonclassic-type cadherins; a subpopulation that does not interact with catenins. The flamingo cadherins are located at the plasma membrane and have nine cadherin domains, seven epidermal growth factor-like repeats and two laminin A G-type repeats in their ectodomain. They also have seven transmembrane domains, a characteristic unique to this subfamily. It is postulated that these proteins are receptors involved in contact-mediated communication, with cadherin domains acting as homophilic binding regions and the EGF-like domains involved in cell adhesion and receptor-ligand interactions. The specific function of this particular member has not been determined.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nakayama M, Nakajima D, Nagase T, Nomura N, Seki N, Ohara O (Sep 1998). "Identification of high-molecular-weight proteins with multiple EGF-like motifs by motif-trap screening". Genomics 51 (1): 27–34. doi:10.1006/geno.1998.5341. PMID 9693030. 
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: CELSR2 cadherin, EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor 2 (flamingo homolog, Drosophila)". 

Further reading[edit]

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.