Cigna

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Cigna
Type Public
Traded as NYSECI
S&P 500 Component
Industry Managed health care
Founded CG and INA merger in 1982
Headquarters 900 Cottage Grove Road
Bloomfield, Connecticut, U.S.
Key people David Cordani, Chairman and CEO
Products Health plans, Group Disability, Life and Accident Insurance, and Disability and Workers' Compensation Case Management
Revenue Increase $ 29.119 billion (2012)[1]
Operating income Increase $ 1.624 billion (2012)[1]
Net income Increase $ 1.624 billion (2012)[1]
Total assets Increase $ 53.734 billion (2012)[1]
Total equity Increase $ 9.769 billion (2012)[1]
Employees 35,800 (Dec 2012)[1]
Website www.Cigna.com

Cigna (pronounced sig-nuh), headquartered in Bloomfield, Connecticut, US, is a global health services organization. Its insurance subsidiaries are major providers of medical, dental, disability, life and accident insurance and related products and services, the majority of which are offered through employers and other groups (e.g. governmental and non-governmental organizations, unions and associations). Cigna also offers Medicare and Medicaid products and health, life and accident insurance coverages primarily to individuals in the U.S. and selected international markets. In addition to its ongoing operations described above, Cigna also has certain run-off operations, including a Run-off Reinsurance segment.[1] In the Phoenix, Arizona metro area Cigna runs a full-service staff-model HMO (health maintenance organization) with satellite clinics throughout the region, known as the Cigna Medical Group[2]

Cigna International Expatriate Benefits' also operates under the Cigna corporation.

Cigna had approximately 35,800 employees as of December 31, 2012.[1]

History[edit]

Cigna was formed by the 1982 merger of the Connecticut General Life Insurance Company (CG) and the Insurance Company of North America (INA), the first stock insurance company in America.[3] INA was formed back in 1792 and is considered to be the ancestor of Cigna. The CG was created in 1865 by a special act of the Governor of Connecticut. In October 1871, the great Chicago Fire burned for two days, destroyed 2,000 acres and left 100,000 people in Illinois homeless. INA paid $650,000, one of only 51 insurance companies (out of a total of 202) to pay claims in full.[4]

Before selling its international property and casualty business to the Bermuda-based ACE Insurance company in the late 1990s, Cigna was among the companies with the largest international network in the league of Allianz, AIG and Zurich. The deal was made for strategic reasons to concentrate on core business. ACE – at that time a key player at the Bermuda and Lloyds insurance market – on the other hand was interested on expanding the international network in the traditional insurance market.[5]

Cigna sold the majority of its life insurance operations to Lincoln National Corporation in 1997.[6][7]

Cigna now operates in 30 countries, has approximately 35,800 employees and manages around US$53.734 billion in assets.[1]

In October 2011, Cigna has agreed to buy HealthSpring Inc. for $3.8 billion to jump-start its business selling Medicare plans from 46,000 Medicare Advantage members to almost 400,000 Medicare Advantage members.[8] The payment would come from an issue of new equity to cover about 20 percent of the value, with the rest funded by additional cash and debt.[8][9]

In 2002, it was alleged in violation of the Securities Exchange Act for earnings manipulation. Its common stock price plummeted significantly as a result.[10]

Cigna International Expatriate Benefits[edit]

Cigna International Expatriate Benefits
Type Subsidiary
Industry Employee Benefits
Founded 1977
Headquarters Wilmington, Delaware, US
Key people Andrew Kielty, President, Cigna International Expatriate Benefits
Products Medical, Dental, Disibility, Life Insurance
Parent Cigna Corporation
Website www.Cignaexpats.com

Cigna International Expatriate Benefits is a business unit within Cigna. The company is headquartered in Wilmington, Delaware, close to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Additional Cigna International Expatriate Benefits operations are located in Visalia, California, and Greenock, Scotland and Shanghai, China. Sales offices are located in North America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Products and services[edit]

CIEB global health plans typically include medical, dental, behavioral and disability, as well as business travel and life components. Expatriates are defined as employees of multinational companies working outside their home country on short, and long-term international assignments.[11] CIEB maintains its own, in-house international claims platform, and offers a network of physician and hospitals for its members (including 550,000 in the U.S. and more than 141,000 outside the U.S.).

Quality of care[edit]

According to Consumer Affairs, Cigna currently has the lowest possible rating (1-star/poor) for customer satisfaction, but should improve after implementation of employee Gary F. Eure's book.[12]

The CNA has determined that Cigna denies roughly 39.6% of all claims (compared to competitors such as Aetna who denied about 5.9% of all claims in the same time frame).[13]

Cigna's claim denial history is infamous to the point that in 2012, The Onion dedicated an entire article to lampooning the company and their CEO, David Cordani.[14]

Ethics[edit]

In December 2007, Cigna was criticized after the company refused to pay for a liver transplant of a California teenage girl, Nataline Sarkisyan, justifying their refusal to pay by claiming that the procedure was experimental, even though there was a liver ready and waiting to be transplanted and doctors estimated she had a 65% chance of surviving at least six months.[15] In response to much protest and public scrutiny, Cigna reversed its decision, though Ms. Sarkisyan died awaiting the transplant.[16] Cigna notes that it had no financial stake in the decision to authorize the transplant because it merely administers the insurance plan of Mr. Sarkisyan's employer and would not bear the cost of any operation. However, Cigna offered to pay for the transplant itself when it made the exception to the policy.[17]

Even though liver transplants have been performed since 1963 and are a well accepted treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure, Cigna defended its actions by claiming that there was insufficient data to show that a transplant for a patient in Sarkisyan's condition would be safe and effective.[17] Lawyers for her family are exploring litigation against Cigna.

The California court agreed with Cigna’s position that the Sarkisyans’ claims regarding Cigna's decision-making were preempted by federal ERISA law. On April 16, 2009, the United States District Court for the Central District of California dismissed all of the claims against Cigna related to the coverage determination.[18]

In August 2012, Cigna fought and lost their argument in court that ABA therapy for autistic children is "experimental". The courts decided the therapy is a known treatment for autistic children, and Cigna’s arguments had no merit. Cigna is currently fighting to have this decision reversed.[19]

Controversy[edit]

On February 9, 2005, CIGNA elected to adopt in the fourth quarter of 2004 fair value accounting for its stock options in accordance with SFAS No. 123 and to restate prior periods.[20]

According to Consumer Affairs, Cigna currently has the lowest possible rating (1-star/poor) for customer satisfaction.[12]

The CNA determined that Cigna denies roughly 39.6% of all claims (compared to competitors such as Aetna who denied about 5.9% of all claims in the same time frame).[13]

Cigna's claim denial history is infamous to the point that in 2012, The Onion dedicated an entire article to lampooning the company and their CEO, David Cordani.[14]

The UK newspaper Guardian in their "Esc and Ctrl" videoblog about control of Internet by corporations documented an incident of Nataline Sarkisyan and former vice president of Cigna talked about astroturfing, the practice of creating fake blogs by interested groups e.g. health insurance companies to push claims that are profitable for said company into media, e.g. dismissing universal health care.[21]

Wendell Potter, a former Cigna executive, resigned from the company due to "disgust". He currently writes books, gives speeches, and contributes to periodicals about his disdain for Cigna and their treatment of customers.[22]

Cigna Shocks Special Needs Family[edit]

In 2014, Kraig and Jennipher Beahn sent a simple language change request to Cigna that resulted in a commitment to change its global policies, and to inspire others around the world to do the same.

The Beahn family's 10-month-old daughter, Kennedi[23] was born with Down Syndrome. When Kennedi was 76 days old she also underwent open heart surgery due to a congenital heart defect. Despite all of this, the Beahn family was determined to prove that their daughter did not have to be defined by her disability. When they received a letter from Cigna regarding their daughter, they were shocked to see their daughter's condition referred to as "mental retardation." Until that day, Kraig Beahn stated that they had never heard that phrase used to describe their daughter's disability.[24]

The Beahn family reached out to Cigna, through e-mail and various social media interfaces, asking for change. They felt the phrase "mental retardation" was outdated and unnecessarily hurtful, suggesting that "intellectually disabled" be used instead. Although the request was a simple language change, the legal complexities involved in such terminology change, and the fact that "mental retardation" was still widely used by doctors, hospitals and insurance providers around the globe, the family's expectations were not high. So it came as a surprise when Cigna responded the way it did.

Cigna wasted little time in responding. Within just two days, the Beahns had received from the insurer not only an apology but also a commitment to change. "We agree with you," the company said, "that 'intellectual disability' is much better terminology than 'mental retardation.'" Just seven days later, Cigna followed up with a second communication explaining the steps they had already taken and those that they intended to take on behalf of "all families that have a loved one with an intellectual disability."

In an email to DisabilityScoop,[25] Cigna representative Mark Slitt referred to the designation of "mental retardation" as both "outdated" and "hurtful," conceding that the only appropriate action would be for the company to abandon the usage altogether in favor of a less derogatory term. Slitt also stated that while the company was committed to the change, it must jump through a few legal and regulatory hoops before it can formally distribute updated documentation. The process could take up to a year.

The Beahns admit to being "shocked beyond belief" that little more than a tactfully worded correspondence could initiate a corporate action with the potential to affect millions of Cigna policyholders. "We cannot begin to express how deep our gratitude reaches," they said.

The Beahn's are hoping however, that by taking the initiative and making an example they might inspire companies around the globe to follow suit by making similar language changes.

Awards[edit]

Cigna received gold in the 2009 Gartner & 1to1 Customer Experience Excellence Award. The awards are given to the companies that "most clearly demonstrate exemplary customer relationship strategy and an unrivaled level of excellence in delivering the customer experience".[26]

Cigna also recently[when?] received the JD Power award for customer service for all of its call centers for the fourth time in a row. According to the company, JD power ensures "Cigna HealthCare’s call center operations successfully passed a detailed audit of its recruiting, training, employee incentives, quality assurance capabilities, and management roles and responsibilities."[27]

The logo of Cigna HealthCare, the health insurance company operating under Cigna Corporation.

Community and civic affairs and charitable giving[edit]

In 2008, the Cigna Foundation contributed $2,533,535 to charitable activities that promote wellness.[28] Since 1995, Cigna and its employees have contributed $22.3 million to the March of Dimes.[28]

In July 2010, Cigna began giving each company employee eight hours of paid time off annually to volunteer with non-profit health and community service organizations.[29] The Salvation Army of Greater Philadelphia helped kick off the program in front of Cigna's Philadelphia headquarters with the Christmas in July campaign.[30]

Lobbying[edit]

Cigna spent more than $4.4 million from 2005 to 2009 on lobbying to attain legislation that the company favors. This includes $720,000 spent in 2009 alone, when it had 20 lobbyists at five firms working on their behalf.[31]

Competitors[edit]

Strategic alliances[edit]

On April 16, 2010, Cigna announced an alliance with Humana group to offer a streamlined Medicare Advantage offering through employer clients for retirees.[32]

Joint Venture in India[edit]

Cigna and TTK Group, an Indian business conglomerate focused on healthcare have formed a joint venture called Cigna TTK to build out a health insurance business in India.[33]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Cigna, Form 10-K, Annual Report, Filing Date Feb 28, 2013". secdatabase.com. Retrieved Mar 25, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Directions to Cigna Corporate Offices." Cigna. Retrieved on September 19, 2011.
  3. ^ Cigna International Expatriate Benefits
  4. ^ http://www.Cigna.com/aboutus/company-history
  5. ^ ACE to Buy Cigna Unit for $3.45 Billion in Cash
  6. ^ "Cigna, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 31, 1997". secdatabase.com. Retrieved Mar 25, 2013. 
  7. ^ Lincoln National Set to Acquire Bulk of a Cigna Business
  8. ^ a b "Cigna, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Oct 24, 2011". secdatabase.com. Retrieved Mar 25, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Cigna to buy Medicare co HealthSpring for $3.8 billion". October 24, 2011. [dead link]
  10. ^ "Cigna Corporation". Retrieved Jun 26, 2013. 
  11. ^ Cigna International Expatriate Benefits
  12. ^ a b [1],
  13. ^ a b [2],
  14. ^ a b "The Onion - David Cordani/Cigna". 
  15. ^ "Los Angeles Local News, US & World, Business, Entertainment, Green News | NBC Los Angeles". Knbc.com. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Health Insurer to Be Charged With Teen's Murder – ABC News". Abcnews.go.com. December 21, 2007. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  17. ^ a b Vanessa Fuhrmans and Laura Meckler (January 7, 2008). "A Medical Case Becomes Political". The Wall Street Journal: A1. Archived from the original on January 8, 2008. Retrieved February 11, 2013. 
  18. ^ Retrieved 2008-01-07.[dead link]
  19. ^ http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/in-autism-suit-against-Cigna-insurance-for-denying-aba-therapy-court-certifies-national-class-action-for-all-Cigna-insureds-167053385.html
  20. ^ "CIGNA Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2004 Results; Strong Earnings Growth Driven by Health Care Results LENGTH:". 
  21. ^ Esc and Ctrl: Jon Ronson investigates astroturfing – video,
  22. ^ [3],
  23. ^ "BabyBeahn.com". BabyBeahn.com. Retrieved 7/1/2014. 
  24. ^ "Tallahassee Family Successfully Pushes Cigna to Change Mental Disability Terminology" (5PM Newscast, Second Lead Story, 6/20/2014). WCTV-TV (CBS). 6/21/2014. Retrieved 7/1/2014. 
  25. ^ Heasley, Shaun (6/26/2014). "Family’s Complaint Prompts Insurer To Drop ‘R-Word’". Disability Scoop, LLC. Retrieved 6/26/2014. 
  26. ^ Retrieved 2009-09-28.[dead link]
  27. ^ "Cigna Newsroom | Cigna HealthCare Recognized for Providing an Outstanding Customer Service Experience For a Fourth Consecutive Year". Newsroom.Cigna.com. January 19, 2010. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  28. ^ a b http://newsroom.Cigna.com/images/56/2008givingreportfinal.pdf
  29. ^ "Cigna rings in new volunteerism program". July 19, 2010. 
  30. ^ "The Salvation Army of Greater Philadelphia: The Salvation Army Launches Christmas in July Campaign". Use.salvationarmy.org. June 29, 2010. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  31. ^ "Center for Responsive Politics". Opensecrets.org. October 31, 2011. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  32. ^ "Cigna Newsroom | Cigna and Humana Form Alliance on Retiree Solutions for Employers". Newsroom.Cigna.com. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  33. ^ "Cigna & TTK form health insurance JV". financialexpress.com. Retrieved April 8, 2014. 

External links[edit]