CKMT1A

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creatine kinase, mitochondrial 1A
Identifiers
Symbol CKMT1A
Alt. symbols CKMT1
Entrez 548596
HUGO 31736
RefSeq NM_001015001
UniProt P12532
Other data
Locus Chr. 15 q15

Creatine kinase, mitochondrial 1A also known as CKMT1A is one of two genes which encode the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (ubiquitous mtCK or CKMT1).[1][2][3]

Function[edit]

Mitochondrial creatine (MtCK) kinase is responsible for the transfer of high energy phosphate from mitochondria to the cytosolic carrier, creatine. It belongs to the creatine kinase isoenzyme family. It exists as two isoenzymes, sarcomeric MtCK (CKMT2) and ubiquitous MtCK, encoded by separate genes. Mitochondrial creatine kinase occurs in two different oligomeric forms: dimers and octamers, in contrast to the exclusively dimeric cytosolic creatine kinase isoenzymes. Ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase has 80% homology with the coding exons of sarcomeric mitochondrial creatine kinase. Two genes located near each other on chromosome 15 (CKMT1A (this gene) and CKMT1B) have been identified which encode identical mitochondrial creatine kinase proteins.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Haas RC, Korenfeld C, Zhang ZF, Perryman B, Roman D, Strauss AW (February 1989). "Isolation and characterization of the gene and cDNA encoding human mitochondrial creatine kinase". J. Biol. Chem. 264 (5): 2890–7. PMID 2914937. 
  2. ^ Stachowiak O, Schlattner U, Dolder M, Wallimann T (July 1998). "Oligomeric state and membrane binding behaviour of creatine kinase isoenzymes: implications for cellular function and mitochondrial structure". Mol. Cell. Biochem. 184 (1-2): 141–51. doi:10.1023/A:1006803431821. PMID 9746318. 
  3. ^ Lipskaya TY (October 2001). "Mitochondrial creatine kinase: properties and function". Biochemistry Mosc. 66 (10): 1098–111. doi:10.1023/A:1012428812780. PMID 11736631. 
  4. ^ "Entrez Gene: CKMT1B creatine kinase, mitochondrial 1A". 

External links[edit]

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.