CMX (comics)

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CMX (comics)
CMX logo.png
Parent company DC Comics
Status defunct (July 1, 2010)[1]
Founded 2004[2]
Country of origin USA
Headquarters location New York City, New York
Publication types Comics
Fiction genres Manga[2]

CMX was an imprint of DC Comics. It was DC's line of manga translations. CMX was known for its censoring of Tenjho Tenge and print version of Fred Gallagher's Megatokyo web manga series.[2]

Controversy[edit]

One of CMX's initial launches was a title variously known as Tengo Tenge, Tenjho Tenge, and Ten Ten. When CMX released Tenjho Tenge, many fans were livid that title had been edited contentwise and changed graphically to appeal to a "larger demographic"—in other words, edited to be acceptable to bookstores without shrinkwrap.[3][4][5][6] Tenjho Tenge and CMX received a heavy amount of angry backlash for the edits.[7][8]

CMX's announcement that all changes had been overseen and specifically approved by Oh! Great, the manga artist, did nothing to appease the vocal fans did not want the work censored. Some readers suggested a boycott of all CMX titles.[9]

In the face of complaints, CMX had internal discussions about the possibility of publishing an unedited version of Tenjho Tenge, but decided to complete the current version.[5] At the 2007 Anime Expo, CMX announced that it planned to change Tenjho Tenge's rating to Mature beginning with volume fifteen, but warned that it still would be edited, but more lightly.[10]

On May 18, 2010, DC Comics released a statement announcing its intention to shut the CMX brand down, with no new titles being published after July 1, 2010. At the time of its statement, DC could not state what would happen to all current unfinished volumes affected by the July 1st shutdown date. Megatokyo however continued under the DC Comics imprint.[1]

Megatokyo by 2013 moved to Dark Horse Comics and Tenjho Tenge went to Viz Media.[2]

List of manga titles published by CMX[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wilbanks, Ashley (2010-05-18). "DC Closes the Door on CMX!". DCCollector.com. Archived from the original on 2010-05-22. Retrieved 2010-05-18. 
  2. ^ a b c d McMillan, Graeme (January 8, 2013). "Short-Stint Imprints: A Look Back at DC's Defunct Lines". Newsarama. p. 10. Retrieved June 3, 2013. 
  3. ^ Reid, Calvin (2005-03-09). "Fans Ticked Over Manga Censorship". Publishers Weekly. Archived from the original on 2008-03-19. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  4. ^ "Interview with DC CEO Paul Levitz 2006, Part 3". ICv2. 2006-08-22. Retrieved 2007-11-30. 
  5. ^ a b "CMX on Tenjho Tenge Edits Again". Anime News Network. 2006-07-10. Retrieved 2012-01-03.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix
  6. ^ "Tenjho Tenge v1". Manga Life. Silver Bullet Comics. Archived from the original on 2007-12-22. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  7. ^ Dungan, Mike (2005-03-07). "Tenjho Tenge Vol. #01 of 15*". Anime on DVD. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  8. ^ "Tenjho Tenge Manga Heavily Edited". Anime News Network. 2005-03-03. Retrieved 2007-12-01. 
  9. ^ Harris, Franklin. "Censored book not a good start." The Decatur Daily. Retrieved on December 1, 2008.
  10. ^ Cha, Kai-Ming (2007-07-03). "Fans Mob AnimeExpo 2007". Publishers Weekly. PWxyz, LLC. Retrieved 2012-01-03.  Query Wayback Bibalex Wayback WebCite Wikiwix

External links[edit]