CONMEBOL

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South American Football Confederation
CONMEBOL logo.svg
CONMEBOL.svg
Abbreviation CONMEBOL
Formation 9 July 1916; 98 years ago (1916-07-09)
Type Federation of national associations
Headquarters Luque, Paraguay
Coordinates 25°15′38″S 57°30′58″W / 25.26056°S 57.51611°W / -25.26056; -57.51611
Region served South America
Membership 10 member associations
Official language Spanish, Portuguese
Secretary General
Jose Luis Meiszner
President Juan Ángel Napout (Interim)
Website www.CONMEBOL.com

The South American Football Confederation (Spanish: Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol,[1] Portuguese: Confederação Sul-Americana de Futebol[2]), commonly known as CONMEBOL[3] /kɒnməbɒl/, also referred to as CSF, is the continental governing body of association football in South America and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay. CONMEBOL is responsible for the organization and governance of South American football's major international tournaments. With 10 member football associations, it has the fewest members of all the confederations in FIFA.

CONMEBOL national teams have won nine FIFA World Cups (Brazil five, Argentina and Uruguay two trophies each), and CONMEBOL clubs have won 22 Intercontinental Cups and four FIFA Club World Cups. Argentina and Uruguay have also won two Olympic gold medals each. It is, along with UEFA, the strongest confederation in the world.

The World Cup qualifiers of CONMEBOL have been rated as the toughest qualifiers in the world,[4][5] for its simple system (round-robin, two rounds), entry of some of the most laureated national teams in the world, leveling of the weaker national teams, climate conditions, geographic conditions, strong home stands and passionate supporters.

Juan Ángel Napout will be the interim president of CONMEBOL until March, 2015 replacing the former president Eugenio Figueredo who resigned on August 8, 2014. The first and second vicepresidents will be Luis Bedoya and Sergio Jaude.

History[edit]

In 1916, the first edition of the Campeonato Sudamericano de Fútbol, now known as the Copa América, was contested in Argentina to commemorate the centenary of the Argentine Declaration of Independence. The four participating associations of that tournament gathered together in order to officially create a governing body to facilitate the organization of the tournament. Thus, CONMEBOL was founded on July 9, 1916, Argentine Independence Day, under the initiative of Uruguayan Héctor Rivadavia, but approved by the football associations of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay. The constitutional congress on December 15 of that same year ratified the decision.

Over the years, the other football associations in South America joined, with the last being Venezuela in 1952. Guyana, Suriname, and the French overseas department of French Guiana, while geographically in South America, are not part of CONMEBOL. Consisting of a French territory, a former British territory, and a former Dutch territory, and located near the Caribbean Sea, they are part of the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF), mainly due to historical, cultural, and sporting reasons. With ten member nations, CONMEBOL is the smallest and the only fully continental land-based FIFA confederation (no insular countries or associates from different continents).

Competitions[edit]

International[edit]

The main competition for men's national teams is the Copa América, started in 1916. CONMEBOL also runs national competitions at Under-20, Under-17 and Under-15 levels. For women's national teams, CONMEBOL operates the Campeonato Sudamericano Femenino for senior national sides as well as Campeonato Sudamericano Femenino Sub-20 and Campeonato Sudamericano Femenino Sub-17 Championships.

In futsal there is the Copa América de Futsal and Campeonato Sudamericano de Futsal Sub-20. The Campeonato Sudamericano Femenino de Futsal is the women's equivalent to the man's tournament. The Preolímpico Sudamericano Sub-23 is now defunct.

Club[edit]

CONMEBOL also runs the two main club competitions in South America: the Copa Libertadores was first held in 1960, and was known as the Copa de Campeones until 1966; and the Copa Sudamericana was launched by CONMEBOL in 2002 as an indirect successor to the Supercopa Libertadores (begun in 1988). A third competition, the Copa CONMEBOL, started in 1992 and was abolished in 1999. In women's football CONMEBOL also conducts the Copa Libertadores de Fútbol Femenino for club teams. The competition was first held in 2009.

The Recopa Sudamericana pits the past year's winners of the Copa Libertadores against the winners of the Copa Sudamericana (previously the winners of the Supercopa Libertadores), and came into being in 1989.

The Intercontinental Cup was jointly organised with UEFA between the Copa Libertadores and the UEFA Champions League winners.the winners four tet copa

Members[edit]

Country Association Founded Joined National team Top division
 Argentina AFA 1893 1916 ARG (M, W) Primera División
 Bolivia FBF 1925 1926 BOL (M, W) Liga Profesional
 Brazil CBF 1914 1916 BRA (M, W) Série A
 Chile FFC 1895 1916 CHI (M, W) Primera División
 Colombia FCF 1924 1936 COL (M, W) Primera A
 Ecuador FEF 1925 1927 ECU (M, W) Serie A
 Paraguay APF 1906 1921 PAR (M, W) División Profesional
 Peru FPF 1922 1925 PER (M, W) Primera División
 Uruguay AUF 1899 1916 URU (M, W) Primera División
 Venezuela FVF 1926 1952 VEN (M, W) Primera División

CONMEBOL competitions[edit]

Performances at FIFA tournaments[edit]

Men's[edit]

World Cup Finals[edit]

World Cup Participation and Results[edit]

Legend
  • 1st – Champion
  • 2nd – Runner-up
  •  3rd  – Third Place[6]
  • 4th - Fourth place
  • QF – Quarterfinals
  • R16 – Round of 16 (since 1986: knockout round of 16)
  • R2 - Second round (for the 1974, 1978, and 1982 tournaments, which had two group stages)
  • GS – Group Stage (in the 1950, 1974, 1978, and 1982 tournaments, which had two group stages, this refers to the first group stage)
  • 1S – First Knockout Stage (1934–1938 Single-elimination tournament)
  • Q — Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •    — Did not qualify
  •     — Did not enter / Withdrew / Banned
  •     — Hosts
Team Uruguay
1930
Italy
1934
France
1938
Brazil
1950
Switzerland
1954
Sweden
1958
Chile
1962
England
1966
Mexico
1970
West Germany
1974
Argentina
1978
Spain
1982
Mexico
1986
Italy
1990
United States
1994
France
1998
South Korea
Japan
2002
Germany
2006
South Africa
2010
Brazil
2014
Russia
2018
Qatar
2022
Total
Appearances
inclusive
WC Qual.
 Brazil GS 1S 3rd 2nd QF 1st 1st GS 1st 4th 3rd R2 QF R16 1st 2nd 1st QF QF 4th 20 20
 Argentina 2nd 1S GS GS QF R2 1st R2 1st 2nd R16 QF GS QF QF 2nd 16 17
 Uruguay 1st 1st 4th GS QF 4th GS R16 R16 GS 4th R16 12 18
 Chile GS GS 3rd GS GS GS R16 R16 R16 9 17
 Paraguay GS GS GS R16 R16 R16 GS QF 8 18
 Colombia GS R16 GS GS QF 5 15
 Peru GS QF R2 GS 4 16
 Bolivia GS GS GS 3 17
 Ecuador GS R16 GS 3 14
 Venezuela 0 12
Combined CONMEBOL Appearances 7 2 1 5 2 3 5 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 6 TBD TBD 80
inclusive World Cup Qualification 7 2 1 5 4 8 9 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 TBD TBD 164

FIFA Confederations Cup[edit]

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • GS – Group stage
  • Q — Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  ••  — Qualified but withdrew
  •  •  — Did not qualify
  •  ×  — Did not enter / Withdrew from the Copa América or withdrew from the Confederations Cup / Banned
  •    — Hosts
Team 1992
Saudi Arabia
1995
Saudi Arabia
1997
Saudi Arabia
1999
Mexico
2001
South Korea
Japan
2003
France
2005
Germany
2009
South Africa
2013
Brazil
2017
Russia
2021
Qatar
Total
 Argentina 1st 2nd × 2nd 3
 Bolivia GS 1
 Brazil × 1st 2nd 4th GS 1st 1st 1st 7
 Colombia 4th 1
 Uruguay 4th 4th 2
Total 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2

Women's[edit]

Women's World Cup Finals[edit]

The following table shows the CONMEBOL representatives at each edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, sorted by alphabetical order.

Team China
1991
Sweden
1995
United States
1999
United States
2003
China
2007
Germany
2011
Canada
2015
Total inclusive
WC Qual.
 Argentina GS GS 2 5
 Bolivia 0 5
 Brazil GS GS 3rd QF 2nd QF 6 6
 Chile 0 6
 Colombia GS 1 4
 Ecuador 0 5
 Paraguay 0 4
 Peru 0 4
 Uruguay 0 4
 Venezuela 0 5
Total 1 1 1 2 2 2 TBA 9
inclusive World Cup Qualification 3 5 10 10 10 10 TBA 50

CONMEBOL presidents[edit]

Headquarters of CONMEBOL in Luque, Paraguay

Rankings[edit]

National teams[edit]

Men's[edit]

Zonal
Ranking
FIFA
Ranking
Country Points
1 2  Argentina 1606
2 4  Colombia 1492
3 6  Uruguay 1330
4 7  Brazil 1241
5 12  Chile 1098
6 21  Ecuador 901
7 30  Venezuela 720
8 48  Paraguay 566
9 59  Peru 487
10 71  Bolivia 429

Last updated on: July 17, 2014 – Current Standings

Women's[edit]

Zonal
Ranking
FIFA
Ranking
Country Points
1 4  Brazil 2042
2 29  Colombia 1650
3 69  Uruguay 1330
4 120  Argentina 1609
5 120  Chile 1544
6 120  Ecuador 1484
7 120  Peru 1450
8 120  Paraguay 1430
9 120  Venezuela 1338
10 120  Bolivia 1236

Last updated on: September 13, 2013 – Current Standings

Clubs[edit]

CONMEBOL[edit]

CONMEBOL
Ranking
Club Points
2 Colombia Santa Fe 399.380
3 Brazil Santos 345.920
4 Argentina Vélez Sársfield 315.870
5 Brazil São Paulo 298.000
6 Brazil Internacional 294.040
7 Paraguay Libertad 268.880
8 Brazil Corinthians 510.200
9 Brazil Atlético Mineiro 245.880
10 Paraguay Olimpia 238.840

Last updated on: July 24, 2013 – Current Standings

IFFHS[edit]

Zonal
Ranking
IFFHS
Ranking
Club Points
1 4 Brazil Corinthians 287.0
2 6 Argentina Boca Juniors 281.0
3 11 Chile Universidad de Chile 223.0
4 12 Brazil Fluminense 222.0
5 19 Paraguay Libertad 205.0
6 23 Brazil Grêmio 202.0
7 24 Brazil Santos 201.0
8 35 Argentina Vélez Sársfield 189.0
9 38 Argentina Tigre 182.0
10 39 Ecuador Emelec 179.5

Last updated on: February 28, 2013 – Current Standings

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Spanish pronunciation: [komfeðeɾaˈθjon suðameɾiˈkana ðe ˈfuðβol], locally: [komfeðeɾaˈsjon suðameɾiˈkana ðe ˈfutβol].
  2. ^ Portuguese pronunciation: [kõfedeɾaˈsɐ̃w ˈsuw.ɐmeɾiˈkɐnɐ dʒi futʃʲˈbɔw].
  3. ^ Acronym created from Confederación/Confederação Sudamericana/Sul-Americana de Fútbol/Futebol.
  4. ^ "La eliminatoria más difícil del mundo", ESPN (in Spanish)
  5. ^ "South American WCQ toughest in world", ESPN
  6. ^ There was no Third Place match in 1930; The United States and Yugoslavia lost in the semifinals. FIFA recognizes the United States as the third-placed team and Yugoslavia as the fourth-placed team using the overall records of the teams in the 1930 FIFA World Cup.

External links[edit]