CTI Electronics Corporation

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CTI Electronics Corporation[1] is a manufacturer of industrial computer peripherals[2] such as rugged keyboards, pointing devices, motion controllers, analog joysticks and many other industrial, military, medical, or aerospace grade input devices. CTI Electronics Corporation products are made in the United States and it is a well-known supplier of input devices to some of the most notable private defense contractors in the world, including Lockheed Martin, DRS Technologies, Computer Sciences Corporation, General Dynamics, BAE Systems, L3 Communications, AAI, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Boeing, Thales Group and many more companies that provide security and defense around the world. CTI also supplies Homeland Security and United States Department of Defense supporting their efforts in protecting and serving the country and military personnel of the United States.

Background[edit]

CTI Electronics Corporation was started in 1986 and is currently located in Stratford, Connecticut.

Industries[edit]

CTI's products are used all over the world in a variety of industries and specialize in highly reliable industrial grade input devices for use harsh environments.[3][4] It's products currently beingused in the control systems of UAVs, UUVs, and UGVs. CTI has also has donated industrial joysticks to students of UW-Madison to for research into the Standing Paraplegic Omni-directional Transport (SPOT)[5][6] These products are not only used for military but are also used in a the medical, industrial, and aerospace industries all over the world.

Product certifications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bloomberg Company Profile (Web), Bloomberg Businessweek, 2011, retrieved 2011 
  2. ^ Industrial-grade computer peripherals: more than just a NEMA enclosure (Print and Web Publication), Processing Magazine, 2013, retrieved 2013 
  3. ^ "Waterproof Instrumentation Panels Ideal for Harsh Conditions". Appliance Design 59 (3): p11. 2011. Retrieved 2012. 
  4. ^ Schneider, Richard T (2001). "Cursor controller and keyboard including lighting". Hydraulics & Pneumatics 54 (12): p14. 
  5. ^ Czink, Katharin (May 9, 2012). "Standing wheelchair fit for the operating room" (Web/News Reel). WGN News. 
  6. ^ Bret Olson, Michael Konrath, Justin Cacciatore, James Madsen, Blake Marzella (2012). "Standing paraplegic operating room device" (Web). UM Madison Department of Biomedical Engineering. Retrieved 2012. 

External links[edit]