Cabildo (opera)

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Cabildo is the only opera by the American composer Amy Beach, her opus 149. This chamber opera is in one act and has a libretto by Nan Bagby Stephens. Beach composed the music in 1932 and made use of folksong and Creole tunes.[1][2] However, the work was not performed in her lifetime and received its first performance in 1947. Subsequent performances were in 1981, at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and in 1982, at the American Musicological Society meeting and the Sonneck Society.[3] The first fully professional production was on May 13, 1995, as part of the "Great Performers at Lincoln Center" series, led by Ransom Wilson and directed by Hans Nieuwenhuis.[4]

The Texas premiere of "Cabildo" was performed by Houston's Opera Vista[5] on September 22, 2007 at the Museum of Fine Arts' Bayou Bend, conducted by Opera Vista's Artistic Director, Viswa Subbaraman and stage directed by Chuck Winkler. This performance led to Opera Vista being invited to perform "Cabildo" at the actual Cabildo in New Orleans on April 18, 2009. The performance was again conducted by Viswa Subbaraman with stage direction by Joe Carl White.

Roles[edit]

Recording[edit]

  • Delos DE 3170: Stephen Mo Hanan, Anthony Dean Griffey, Charlotte Hellekant, Eugene Perry, Paul Groves, Thomas Paul, Lauren Flanigan; The New York Concert Singers; Instrumental ensemble; Ransom Wilson, conductor

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dickinson, Peter, "Reviews of Music" (February 1998). Music & Letters, 79 (1): pp. 156-157.
  2. ^ Pollack, Howard, "Review of Amy Beach, Passionate Victorian: The Life and Work of an American Composer, 1867-1944" by Adrienne Fried Block (Summer 2001). Journal of the American Musicological Society, 54 (2): pp. 389-395.
  3. ^ Dickinson, Peter, "Reviews of Books by Jeanell Wise Brown and by Walter S. Jenkins on Amy Beach" (November 1996). Music & Letters, 77 (4): pp. 633-635.
  4. ^ Bernard Holland (1995-05-15). "A Composer Who Made Her Timely Choice". New York Times. Retrieved 2007-10-20. 
  5. ^ {http://www.operavista.org}

External links[edit]