Cahuilla traditional narratives

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Cahuilla traditional narratives include myths, legends, tales, and oral histories preserved by the Cahuilla people of the Colorado Desert and Peninsular Ranges of southern California.

Cahuilla oral literature has much in common with the traditions of the other Takic-speaking groups of southern California and with the Yumans of southern California, western Arizona, and northern Baja California. (See also Traditional narratives (Native California).)

Sources for Cahuilla narratives[edit]

  • Apodaca, Paul. 1999. Tradition, myth, and performance of Cahuilla bird songs. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Folklore & Mythology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA.
  • Apodaca, Paul (with Luke Madrigal). 1999. "Cahuilla bird songs", California Chronicles, 2(2): 4-8.
  • Bean, Lowell John. 1992. "Menil (Moon): Symbolic Representation of Cahuilla Woman". In Earth & Sky: Visions of the Cosmos in Native American Folklore, edited by Ray A. Williamson and Claire R. Farrer, pp. 162–183. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, NM. (Summary, interpretation, and some original presentation of Cahuilla myths.)
  • Curtis, Edward S. 1907-1930. The North American Indian. 20 vols. Plimpton Press, Norwood, MA. (Desert and Pass Cahuilla versions of the Creation myth, collected from Charley Alamo and William Pablo, vol. 15, pp. 106–121.)
  • Gifford, Edward Winslow, and Gwendoline Harris Block. 1930. California Indian Nights. Arthur H. Clark, Glendale, CA. (Three previously published narratives, pp. 196–198, 227-232.)
  • Hooper, Lucile. 1920. "The Cahuilla Indians". University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 16:315-380. Berkeley, CA. (Myths collected in 1918, pp. 317–328, 364-378.)
  • Kroeber, A. L. 1925. Handbook of the Indians of California. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin No. 78. Washington, DC (Brief comments on the Creation myth, pp. 707.)
  • Margolin, Malcolm. 1993. The Way We Lived: California Indian Stories, Songs, and Reminiscences. First edition 1981. Heyday Books, Berkeley, CA. (Creation myth, p. 124-125, from Hooper 1920.)
  • Patencio, Francisco. 1943. Stories and Legends of the Palm Springs Indians. As told to Margaret Boynton. Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, CA. (Numerous myths and legends documented in the 1930s.) OCLC 4020904
  • Patencio, Francisco. 1971. Desert Hours with Chief Patencio. As told to Kate Collins. Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, CA. (A few additional traditional narratives recorded in the 1930s, along with predominantly historic-period material.) OCLC 2298555
  • Saubel, Katherine Siva. 1968. "Adventures of Konvaxmal". Indian Historian 1(4):28. (One myth.)
  • Strong, William Duncan. 1929. "Aboriginal Society in Southern California". University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 26:1-358. Berkeley. (Desert and Pass Cahuilla myths and legends, pp. 86–87, 100-102, 109, 130-143.)
  • Seiler, Hansjakob. 1970. Cahuilla Texts. Indiana University Research Center for the Language Sciences, Bloomington, IN.
  • Woosley, David J. 1908. "Cahuilla Tales". Journal of American Folklore 21:239-240. (Two brief narratives from the Colorado Desert.)

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