Caldbeck

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Caldbeck
Caldbeck is located in Cumbria
Caldbeck
Caldbeck
 Caldbeck shown within Cumbria
Population 714 (2001)
District Allerdale
Shire county Cumbria
Region North West
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Dialling code 016974
Police Cumbria
Fire Cumbria
Ambulance North West
EU Parliament North West England
List of places
UK
England
Cumbria

Coordinates: 54°44′N 3°03′W / 54.73°N 3.05°W / 54.73; -3.05

Caldbeck is a village and civil parish in the Borough of Allerdale, Cumbria, England. Historically within Cumberland, the village had 714 inhabitants according to the census of 2001.[1] It lies on the northern edge of the Lake District. The nearest town is Wigton, 6 miles north east of the village. In the last few years it has seen a massive house price boom, with many properties more than doubling their value over a couple of years.

The village is popular with tourists from across the globe. Caldbeck's most infamous/famous former resident is the hunter John Peel, whose grave is in the local churchyard. Prince Charles has visited the village several times in the last 10 years, overseeing the launch of the Northern Fells Rural Project, and in later years the end of the project, which became the Northern Fells Group. A famous resident is the climber Chris Bonington.

The village has a primary school situated in the area of Upton to the south west of the village proper. The northern part of the village centred on a large green is called Ratten Row.

The parish church is dedicated to St. Kentigern.

Caldbeck's closest fell is High Pike, which is a popular walk from the village. It is also the starting point for many other fell walking routes.

Within the civil parish of Caldbeck is also the village and former market town of Hesket Newmarket.

Approximately two miles from the village is located the Caldbeck transmitting station, 1,106 ft television and radio broadcasting station that covers most of northern Cumbria and south west Scotland.

Etymology[edit]

" 'The cold stream'; ON 'kaldr', 'bekkr'. The village and parish are named from the 'Cald Beck'..." [2] (ON=Old Norse). " 'bekkr'...is the usual Lakeland name for 'stream', occurring some 200 times..."[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Whaley, Diana (2006). A dictionary of Lake District place-names. Nottingham: English Place-Name Society. pp. lx,423 p.63. ISBN 0904889726. 
  3. ^ Whaley, 2006, p.389

External links[edit]