Caleb Tompkins

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Caleb Tompkins, New York Judge and Congressman

Caleb Tompkins (December 22, 1759 – January 1, 1846) was a U.S. Representative from New York, and the brother of Vice President Daniel D. Tompkins.

Early life[edit]

Caleb Tompkins was born on the Fox Meadows estate near Scarsdale, New York on December 22, 1759, and was the eldest son of Jonathan G. Tompkins, a prominent judge and landowner. He was educated locally, and trained for a legal career.[1][2]

American Revolution[edit]

Tompkins served as a Private in the 2nd Regiment of Westchester County Militia (Thomas's Regiment) during the American Revolution.[3][4] In October, 1776 he abandoned his home and fled British troops, successfully evading capture by submerging himself in a nearby swamp.[5] This incident was known to James Fenimore Cooper, who used a fictionalized version of it in his 1821 novel The Spy.[6][7]

Tompkins remained in the militia after the war, and was a Captain when he resigned in 1797.[8][9]

Career[edit]

Tompkins studied law, attained admission to the bar, and practiced in Westchester County. He also inherited Fox Meadows, where he resided throughout his life.[10]

An Anti-Federalist who became a member of the Democratic-Republican Party and later a Democrat who identified with the Bucktails and Jacksonians, he was Scarsdale's first Town Clerk, and held other local offices including Town Supervisor.[11][12][13]

Tompkins was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1804 to 1806.[14] He served as Judge of the Westchester County Court from 1807 to 1820.[15]

Tompkins was elected to the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Congresses, and served from March 4, 1817 to March 3, 1821.[16]

In 1823 Tompkins returned to the position of Westchester County Judge, and he remained on the bench until his death.[17] In 1828 he was an unsuccessful candidate for Congress, losing a narrow contest to Henry B. Cowles.

Death and burial[edit]

Tompkins died in Scarsdale, New York, January 1, 1846.[18][19] He was interred in the First Presbyterian Church Cemetery in White Plains.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marquis Who's Who, Who Was Who in America, 1963, page 533
  2. ^ Lyman Horace Weeks, John Hampden Dougherty, Legal and Judicial History of New York, Volume 3, 1911, page 112
  3. ^ Frank Lindsay Crawford, Charlotte Holmes Crawford, Morris D'Camp Crawford and His Wife, Charlotte Holmes Crawford: Their Lives, Ancestries and Descendants, 1939, page 7
  4. ^ New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, he New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Volume 112, 1981, page 95
  5. ^ Porter Sargent, A Handbook of New England, page 236
  6. ^ Sarah Comstock, Old Roads from the Heart of New York, 1915, page 293
  7. ^ John Thomas Scharf, editor, History of Westchester County: New York, Volume 1, Part 2, 1886, page 664
  8. ^ Hugh Hastings, State Historian, Henry Harmon Noble, Chief Clerk, Military Minutes of the Council of Appointment of the State of New York, 1783-1821., Volume 1, 1901
  9. ^ New York State Legislature, Documents of the Senate of the State of New York, Volume 9, 1902, page 365
  10. ^ Silas Constant, Emily Warren Roebling, The Journal of the Reverend Silas Constant, 1903, page 133
  11. ^ Sean Wilentz, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln, 2006, page 234
  12. ^ John Thomas Scharf, History of Westchester County: New York, Volume 1, 1886, page 662
  13. ^ Westchester County Board of Supervisors, Proceedings of the County Board of Legislators of Westchester County, N.Y., 1795, page 148
  14. ^ Stephen C. Hutchins, Edgar Albert Werner, Civil List and Constitutional History of the Colony and State of New York, 1891, pages 464-465
  15. ^ Henry Townsend Smith, Manual of Westchester County: Past and Present, Volume 3, 1913, page 215
  16. ^ Charles Lanman, Dictionary of the United States Congress, 2006, page 379
  17. ^ Henry Townsend Smith, Manual of Westchester County: Past and Present, Volume 3, 1913, page 215
  18. ^ John Thomas Scharf, History of Westchester County: New York, Volume 1, 1886, page 662
  19. ^ Westchester County Board of Supervisors, Proceedings of the County Board of Legislators of Westchester County, N.Y., 1795, page 148
  20. ^ Thomas E. Spencer, Where They're Buried, 1998, page 254

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jonathan Ward
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 3rd congressional district

1817 - 1821
Succeeded by
Jeremiah H. Pierson