Calhoun County, Alabama

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Calhoun County, Alabama
Calhoun County, Alabama Courthouse.JPG
Calhoun County courthouse in Anniston
Map of Alabama highlighting Calhoun County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Founded December 18, 1832
as Benton County
Seat Anniston
Largest city Anniston
Area
 • Total 612.32 sq mi (1,586 km2)
 • Land 608.46 sq mi (1,576 km2)
 • Water 3.86 sq mi (10 km2), 0.63%
Population
 • (2010) 118,572
 • Density 195/sq mi (75.2/km²)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.calhouncounty.org

Calhoun County is a county in the U.S. state of Alabama. Its name is in honor of John C. Calhoun, famous member of the United States Senate from South Carolina. As of the 2010 census the population was 118,572.[1] It is included in the Anniston-Oxford Metropolitan Statistical Area. Its county seat is Anniston.

History[edit]

Benton County was established on December 18, 1832, named for Thomas Hart Benton, a member of the United States Senate from Missouri, with its county seat at Jacksonville. Benton, a slave owner, was a political ally of John C. Calhoun, another slaveholder and a U.S. senator from South Carolina. Through the 1820s-1840s, however, Benton's and Calhoun's political interests diverged, with Calhoun increasingly using secession as a weapon to maintain and expand slavery throughout the United States. Benton, on the other hand, was slowly coming to the conclusion that slavery was wrong and that preservation of the union was paramount. On January 29, 1858, Alabama supporters of slavery, objecting to Benton's change of heart, renamed Benton County as Calhoun County. The county seat was moved to Anniston after years of controversy and a State Supreme Court ruling in June 1900. An F4 tornado struck here on Palm Sunday March 27, 1994. It destroyed Piedmont's Goshen United Methodist Church twelve minutes after the National Weather Service of Birmingham issued a tornado warning for northern Calhoun, southeastern Etowah, and southern Cherokee.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 612.32 square miles (1,585.9 km2), of which 608.46 square miles (1,575.9 km2) (or 99.37%) is land and 3.86 square miles (10.0 km2) (or 0.63%) is water.[2]

Major highways[edit]

Rail[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 14,260
1850 17,163 20.4%
1860 21,539 25.5%
1870 13,980 −35.1%
1880 19,591 40.1%
1890 33,835 72.7%
1900 34,874 3.1%
1910 39,115 12.2%
1920 47,822 22.3%
1930 55,611 16.3%
1940 63,319 13.9%
1950 79,539 25.6%
1960 95,878 20.5%
1970 103,092 7.5%
1980 119,761 16.2%
1990 116,034 −3.1%
2000 112,249 −3.3%
2010 118,572 5.6%
Est. 2012 117,296 −1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[3]
2012 Estimate[4]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 112,249 people, 45,307 households, and 31,307 families residing in the county. The population density was 184 people per square mile (71/km2). There were 51,322 housing units at an average density of 84 per square mile (33/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 78.88% White, 18.54% Black or African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.59% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. 1.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 45,307 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.20% were married couples living together, 13.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.90% were non-families. 26.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.60% under the age of 18, 10.40% from 18 to 24, 27.80% from 25 to 44, 24.10% from 45 to 64, and 14.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,768, and the median income for a family was $39,908. Males had a median income of $30,847 versus $21,076 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,367. About 12.40% of families and 16.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.60% of those under age 18 and 12.70% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

Presidential election results
Year GOP DEM Others
2008 65.7% 32,348 33.2% 16,334 1.1% 560
2004 65.9% 29,814 33.3% 15,083 0.8% 352
2000 57.3% 22,306 40.6% 15,781 2.1% 822
1996 49.0% 18,088 42.6% 15,725 8.4% 3,098
1992 48.2% 20,623 38.4% 16,453 13.4% 5,724
1988 58.3% 19,806 36.7% 12,451 5.0% 1,711
1984 61.2% 23,291 33.5% 12,752 5.4% 2,039
1980 49.2% 17,475 47.9% 17,017 2.9% 1,049
1976 36.0% 11,763 62.6% 20,466 1.4% 471
1972 76.9% 20,364 22.0% 5,832 1.0% 275
1968 11.4% 3,061 15.5% 4,146 73.0% 19,568
1964 63.1% 10,635 0.0% 0 36.9% 6,210
1960 33.0% 4,821 65.6% 9,590 1.5% 218

Calhoun is a staunchly Republican county in Presidential and Congressional elections. The last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Jimmy Carter in 1976. In 2008, Republican John McCain won 66% of the county's vote.

Calhoun is part of Alabama's 3rd congressional district, which is held by Republican Mike D. Rogers.

Cities and towns[edit]

Incorporated[edit]

Unincorporated[edit]

Places of interest[edit]

Calhoun County is home to Jacksonville State University, the Anniston Museum of Natural History, the Berman Museum of World History and the Coldwater Covered Bridge. It also contains a portion of the Talladega National Forest.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ United States Census Bureau. "2010 Census Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  2. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  3. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Census.gov. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  5. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

Coordinates: 33°46′10″N 85°49′15″W / 33.76944°N 85.82083°W / 33.76944; -85.82083