Calhoun County, Texas

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Calhoun County, Texas
Map of Texas highlighting Calhoun County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1846
Named for John C. Calhoun
Seat Port Lavaca
Largest city Port Lavaca
Area
 • Total 1,032 sq mi (2,673 km2)
 • Land 512 sq mi (1,326 km2)
 • Water 520 sq mi (1,347 km2), 50.36%
Population
 • (2010) 21,381
 • Density 41/sq mi (16/km²)
Congressional district 27th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.calhouncotx.org

Calhoun County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,381.[1] Its county seat is Port Lavaca.[2] The county is named for John Caldwell Calhoun, the seventh vice president of the United States.

Calhoun County comprises the Port Lavaca, TX Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Victoria-Port Lavaca, TX Combined Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,033 square miles (2,680 km2), of which 507 square miles (1,310 km2) is land and 526 square miles (1,360 km2) (50.9%) is water.[21]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,110
1860 2,642 138.0%
1870 3,443 30.3%
1880 1,739 −49.5%
1890 815 −53.1%
1900 2,395 193.9%
1910 3,635 51.8%
1920 4,700 29.3%
1930 5,385 14.6%
1940 5,911 9.8%
1950 9,222 56.0%
1960 16,592 79.9%
1970 17,831 7.5%
1980 19,574 9.8%
1990 19,053 −2.7%
2000 20,647 8.4%
2010 21,381 3.6%
Est. 2012 21,609 1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[22]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 21,381 people residing in the county. 81.5% were White, 4.4% Asian, 2.6% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 8.8% of some other race and 2.1% of two or more races. 46.4% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

As of the census[23] of 2000, there were 20,647 people, 7,442 households, and 5,574 families residing in the county. The population density was 40 people per square mile (16/km²). There were 10,238 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (8/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 78.04% White, 2.63% Black or African American, 0.49% Native American, 3.27% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 13.19% from other races, and 2.32% from two or more races. 40.92% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 11.4% were of German, 9.4% American and 5.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 67.9% spoke English, 29.1% Spanish and 1.2% Chinese as their first language.

There were 7,442 households out of which 35.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.20% were married couples living together, 11.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.10% were non-families. 21.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.50% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 22.30% from 45 to 64, and 13.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 100.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,849, and the median income for a family was $39,900. Males had a median income of $35,957 versus $19,772 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,125. About 12.70% of families and 16.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.30% of those under age 18 and 11.70% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

All of Calhoun County is served by the Calhoun County Independent School District.

Our Lady of the Gulf Catholic school, pre-K through grade 8, has also served the county since 1996.

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Airport[edit]

Calhoun County Airport, a general aviation airport, is located in unincorporated Calhoun County northwest of Port Lavaca.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated areas[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Kleiner, Diana. "Calhoun County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  4. ^ Little, Carol Morris (1996). A Comprehensive Guide to Outdoor Sculpture in Texas. University of Texas Press. pp. 358–359. ISBN 978-0-292-76036-3. 
  5. ^ Wade, Marian F and Don E; Hester, Thomas R (2002). The Native Americans of the Texas Edwards Plateau, 1582-1799. University of Texas Press. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-292-79156-5. 
  6. ^ Roell, Craig H. "John Joseph Linn". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  7. ^ Roell, Craig H. "Linnville Raid of 1840". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  8. ^ Morgenthaler, Jefferson (2009). Promised Land: Solms, Castro, and Sam Houston's Colonization Contracts. TAMU Press. p. 135. ISBN 978-1-60344-119-3. 
  9. ^ a b c "Indianola". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  10. ^ Handbook of Texas, The Morgan Line
  11. ^ Obedele-Starks, Ernest (2007). Freebooters and Smugglers: The Foreign Slave Trade in the United States after 1808. University of Arkansas Press. p. 119. ISBN 978-1-55728-858-5. 
  12. ^ Jones, Ray (2002). American Lighthouses, 2nd: A Definitive Guide. Globe Pequot. pp. 169–170. ISBN 978-0-7627-2269-3. 
  13. ^ Townsend, Stephen A (2006). The Yankee Invasion of Texas. TAMU Press. p. 28. ISBN 978-1-58544-487-8. 
  14. ^ "Port Lavaca". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  15. ^ Norcross, Bryan (2007). Hurricane Almanac: The Essential Guide to Storms Past, Present, and Future. St. Martin's Griffin. pp. 38–39. 
  16. ^ "Oliva, Texas". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  17. ^ "Port O'Connor". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  18. ^ "Point Comfort". Texas Escapes. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  19. ^ Michaels, Patrick J (2005). Meltdown: The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media. Cato Institute. p. 112. ISBN 978-1-930865-79-2. 
  20. ^ "Matagorda Island Wildlife Management Area". Shannon D. Moore. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  21. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  22. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  23. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 28°26′N 96°37′W / 28.44°N 96.61°W / 28.44; -96.61