California Inland Empire Council

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California Inland Empire Council (#045)
California Inland Empire Council CSP.png
Owner Boy Scouts of America
Headquarters Redlands, California
Country United States
Founded 1916
President Donna Baker
Council Commissioner Scott "Mac" McLeod
Scout Executive Joseph Daniszewski
Website
bsa-ciec.org
 Scouting portal

The California Inland Empire Council (CIEC) was formed in 1973 through the merger of the Arrowhead Area (#048) and Riverside Area Councils (#045). In 1974 Grayback Council (#024) also merged into the new council.[1] In 2006, the council acquired the San Bernardino County portions of Old Baldy Council (#043). The council territory includes all of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.

History[edit]

The Riverside Area Council (#045) was founded in 1919 as the Riverside Council. In 1927, the Hemet-San Jacinto Valley Council (#028) merged into the merged into Riverside Area Council (#045). In 1944, the council changed its name to Riverside County and Redlands, and in 1945 back to Riverside County. The Grayback Council (#024) was founded in 1945 as the Redlands Area Council. It changed its name in 1952. The Arrowhead Area (#048) council was formed in 1922 as the San Bernardino Valley council. Prior to adopting the name Arrowhead Area in 1933, the council was known as the San Bernardino District from 1923 to 1933.[2]

Organization[edit]

  • Arrowhead District
  • Five Nations District
  • Grayback District
  • High Desert District
  • River Valley District
  • Sunrise District
  • Tahquitz District
  • Temescal District
  • Three Peaks District
  • Old Baldy District as of May 2006 (Ontario, Montclair, Upland, and Rancho Cucamonga)[3]

Camps[edit]

  • Camp Emerson, in Idyllwild-Pine Cove, California. Council operated since 1919, largely on land donated to the former Riverside County Council by developer and humanitarian Lee Emerson.
  • Camp Helendade, near Running Springs, California. Council operated since 1960. It was partially burned in the California October 2007 fires.[4][5][6] Camp Helendade was given to Arrowhead Area Council in 1960 by Helen and Dade Davis, replacing Camp Arataba, located in the Barton Flats area. Camp Arataba, part of the history of Arrowhead Area Council since the 1920s, was the victim of a lodge fire in 1960. The loss inspired the Davises to donate the land for a camp to the Boy Scouts. Camp Helendade was originally called Camp Running Springs, but Edward Saxton, the Scout Executive of Arrowhead Area Council at the time, wanted to name the new camp in a manner that honored the donors. Hence the name Helendade was selected (Helen + Dade).[4]

Order of the Arrow[edit]

The Council is served by the Cahuilla Lodge #127.[7] It currently has nine chapters, roughly one serving each district (the High Desert District has two chapters due to its large geographic size). "[It] was formed January 1, 1973 from the merger of Tahquitz Lodge # 127 and Wisumahi Lodge # 478.[8] In 1974, the Lodge welcomed A-tsa Lodge # 380 into the family to make the territory of the Lodge as we know it today." With the merger of the Old Baldy Council, Navajo Lodge #98 also was merged into the Cahuilla Lodge.[7] The Lodge has received many awards, local and national, in its history, including the National Service Award (2001), the E. Urner Goodman Camping Award (most recently in 2006), and the Section W4B Spirit Award (17 times in 29 years; most recently in 2006 (tie)).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.bsa-ciec.org/about/history.php
  2. ^ Hook, James; Franck, Dave; Austin, Steve (1982). An Aid to Collecting Selected Council Shoulder Patches with Valuation. 
  3. ^ California Inland Empire Council
  4. ^ a b "Running Springs Fire Update". California Inland Empire Council. Oct 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-23. 
  5. ^ "Fires Consume 5,000 Acres Total". Fire & Wind. The Sun Daily Bulletin. Oct 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-23. 
  6. ^ "Main Page Website". Camp Helendade Website. Oct 2007. Retrieved 2007-10-23. 
  7. ^ a b History - Cahuilla Lodge # 127, Order of the Arrow, Boy Scouts of America
  8. ^ http://www.oaimages.com/478.shtml