California Proposition 77 (2005)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Proposition 77 was a California ballot proposition on the 2005 California special election ballot.

Official summary[edit]

From the California Attorney General:

Redistricting. Initiative constitutional amendment.

  • Amends process for redistricting California Senate, Assembly, Congressional and Board of Equalization districts.
  • Requires panel of three retired judges, selected by legislative leaders, to adopt new redistricting plan if measure passes and after each national census.
  • Panel must consider legislative, public comments/hold public hearings.
  • Redistricting plan effective when adopted by panel and filed with California Secretary of State; governs next statewide primary/general elections even if voters reject plan.
  • If voters reject redistricting plan, process repeats, but officials elected under rejected plan serve full terms.
  • Allows 45 days to seek judicial review of adopted redistricting plan.

Summary of Legislative Analyst's estimate of net state and local government fiscal impact:

  • One-time costs for a redistricting plan. State costs totaling no more than $1.5 million and county costs in the range of $1 million.
  • Potential reduction in costs for each redistricting effort after 2010, but net impact would depend on decisions by voters.

Results[edit]

The proposition was rejected with a margin of 19.4% of voters rejecting it (About 1,474,930 ballots).

References[edit]

See also[edit]