California elections, 2002

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California's state elections were held November 5, 2002. Necessary primary elections were held on March 5. Up for election were all the seats of the California State Assembly, 20 seats of the California Senate, seven constitutional officers, all the seats of the California Board of Equalization, as well as votes on retention of two Supreme Court justices and various appeals court judges. Seven ballot measures were also up for approval. Municipal offices were also included in the election.

Incumbent governor Gray Davis won reelection with less than 50% of the vote over his Republican challenger Bill Simon. [1] Democrats also won every other statewide office and maintained their majorities in both houses of the state legislature.

Constitutional Offices[edit]

Governor[edit]

See also California gubernatorial election, 2002.

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[2]

2002 California gubernatorial election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gray Davis (incumbent) 3,533,490 47.3%
Republican Bill Simon 3,169,801 42.4%
Green Peter Miguel Camejo 393,036 5.3%
Libertarian Gary David Copeland 161,203 2.2%
American Independent Reinhold Gulke 128,035 1.7%
Natural Law Iris Adam 88,415 1.1%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

See also California lieutenant governor election, 2002.

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[3]

2002 Lieutenant Governor of California election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cruz Bustamante (incumbent) 3,589,804 49.5%
Republican Bruce McPherson 3,031,571 41.8%
Green Donna J. Warren 298,951 4.1%
Libertarian Pat Wright 104,920 1.4%
American Independent James D. King 91,015 1.2%
Reform Paul Jerry Hanosh 80,307 1.1%
Natural Law Kalee Przybylak 66,847 0.9%
Totals 7,263,415 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Secretary of State[edit]

See also California Secretary of State election, 2002.

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[4]

2002 California Secretary of State election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kevin Shelley 3,295,397 46.4%
Republican Keith Olberg 3,008,539 42.3%
Green Lawrence H. Shoup 274,523 3.9%
Libertarian Gail Lightfoot 200,146 2.8%
Natural Law Louise Marie Allison 173,139 2.4%
American Independent Edward C. Noonan 85,791 1.2%
Reform Valli Sharpe-Geisler 76,875 1.0%
Totals 7,114,410 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic gain from Republican

Controller[edit]

See also California State Controller election, 2002.

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[5]

2002 California State Controller election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steve Westly 3,228,908 45.4%
Republican Tom McClintock 3,206,178 45.1%
Green Laura Wells 409,172 5.8%
Natural Law J. Carlos Aguirre 176,791 2.4%
American Independent Ernest F. Vance 94,088 1.3%
Totals 7,115,137 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Treasurer[edit]

See also California State Treasurer election, 2002.

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[6]

2002 California State Treasurer election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Phil Angelides (incumbent) 3,481,146 49.4%
Republican Phillip Gregory Conlon 2,853,997 40.5%
Green Jeanne-Marie Rosenmeier 346,423 5.0%
Libertarian Marian Smithson 165,040 2.3%
Natural Law Sylvia Valentine 109,259 1.5%
American Independent Nathan E. Johnson 94,974 1.3%
Totals 7,050,839 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Attorney General[edit]

See also California Attorney General election, 2002.

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[7]

2002 California Attorney General election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Lockyer (incumbent) 3,646,829 51.4%
Republican Dick Ackerman 2,860,542 40.4%
Green Glen Freeman Mowrer 275,475 3.9%
American Independent Diane B. Templin 190,187 2.6%
Libertarian Ed Kuwatch 124,504 1.7%
Totals 7,097,447 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Insurance Commissioner[edit]

See also California Insurance Commissioner election, 2002.

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[8]

2002 California Insurance Commissioner election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Garamendi 3,283,367 46.6%
Republican Gary Mendoza 2,937,820 41.7%
Green David Ishmael Sheidlower 270,295 3.9%
Libertarian Dale F. Ogden 232,182 3.2%
Natural Law Raul Calderon 188,283 2.6%
American Independent Steven A. Klein 146,200 2.0%
Totals 7,058,147 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Board of Equalization[edit]

Overview[edit]

California Board of Equalization elections, 2002
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 3,391,313 50.28% 2 0
Republican 3,092,030 45.84% 2 0
Libertarian 262,083 3.89% 0 0
Totals 6,745,426 100.00% 4

District 1[edit]

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[9]

2002 State Board of Equalization District 1 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carole Migden 1,171,688 60.64%
Republican David J. Neighbors 648,849 33.59%
Libertarian Elizabeth C. Brierly 111,386 5.77%
Totals 1,931,923 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[10]

2002 State Board of Equalization District 2 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Leonard 1,027,716 58.54%
Democratic Tim Raboy 728,061 41.46%
Totals 1,755,777 100.0%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[11]

2002 State Board of Equalization District 3 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Claude Parrish (incumbent) 1,008,170 58.93%
Democratic Mary Christian-Heising 636,300 37.20%
Libertarian J. R. Graham 66,171 3.87%
Totals 1,710,641 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[12]

2002 State Board of Equalization District 4 election
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Chiang (incumbent) 855,264 63.49%
Republican Glen R. Forsch 407,295 30.24%
Libertarian Kenneth A. Weissman 84,526 6.27%
Totals 1,347,085 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Judicial system[edit]

Supreme Court of California[edit]

Final results from the California Secretary of State:[13]

Associate Justice Marvin Baxter, Seat 1
Vote on retention Votes % ±%
Yes 3,455,084 71.6%
No 1,373,645 28.4%
Total votes 4,828,729 100.0%
Majority 2,081,439 43.2%
Turnout
Associate Justice Kathryn Werdegar, Seat 2
Vote on retention Votes % ±%
Yes 3,704,040 74.2%
No 1,294,277 25.8%
Total votes 4,998,317 100.0%
Majority 2,409,763 48.4%
Turnout
Associate Justice Carlos Moreno, Seat 3
Vote on retention Votes % ±%
Yes 3,628,632 72.6%
No 1,370,685 27.4%
Total votes 4,999,317 100.0%
Majority 2,257,947 45.2%
Turnout

California Courts of Appeal[edit]

See California Courts of Appeal elections, 2002.

California State Legislature elections[edit]

State Senate[edit]

For individual races see California State Senate elections, 2002.

There are 40 seats in the State Senate. For this election, candidates running in odd-numbered districts ran for four-year terms.[1]

California State Senate - 2002 Seats
  Democratic-Held 25
  Republican-Held 15
2002 Elections
  Democratic Held and Uncontested 11
  Contested 15
  Republican Held and Uncontested 14
 Total
40

State Assembly[edit]

For individual races see California State Assembly elections, 2002.

All 80 biennially elected seats of the State Assembly were up for election this year. Each seat has a two-year term. The Democrats retained control of the State Assembly.[2]

California State Assembly - 2002 Seats
  Democratic-Held 48
  Republican-Held 32
2002 Elections
  Democratic Incumbent and Uncontested 32
  Contested, Open Seats 32
  Republican Incumbent and Uncontested 16
 Total
80

Statewide ballot propositions[edit]

Seven propositions qualified to be listed on the general election ballot in California. Five of them passed.

Proposition 46[edit]

Proposition 46 would create a trust fund by selling $2.1 billion in general obligation funds to fund 21 types of housing programs, including multifamily, individual and farmworker housing. Proposition 46 passed with 57.5% approval. [14]

Proposition 47[edit]

The state would sell $13 billion in general obligation bonds for construction and renovation of K-12 school facilities and higher education facilities. Proposition 47 passed with 59% approval. [15]

Proposition 48[edit]

Would amend the Constitution to delete references to the municipal courts. Proposition 48 passed with 72.8% approval. [16]

Proposition 49[edit]

Would substantially increase funding for before and after-school programs, and make general funds permanently earmarked for the programs beginning in the 2004-2005 school year. Proposition 49 passed with 56.6% approval. [17]

Proposition 50[edit]

The state would borrow $3.4 billion through the sale of general obligation bonds for water projects. Proposition 50 passed with 55.4% approval. [18]

Proposition 51[edit]

Would permanently allocate sales and use taxes raised from the sale or lease of motor vehicles to specific transportation projects. Proposition 51 failed with 41.4% approval. [19]

Proposition 52[edit]

Would allow legally eligible California residents presenting proof of current residence to register to vote on Election Day (same-day voter registration). Proposition 52 failed with 40.6% approval. [20]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]