California elections, 2006

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The California state elections, 2006 took place on November 7, 2006. Necessary primary elections were held on June 6. Among the elections that took place were all the seats of the California's State Assembly, 20 seats of the State Senate, seven constitutional officers, and all the seats of the Board of Equalization. Votes on retention of two Supreme Court justices and various Courts of Appeal judges were also held. Five propositions were also up for approval.

United States Senate[edit]

United States Senate election in California, 2006[1][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dianne Feinstein (incumbent) 5,076,289 59.43%
Republican Dick Mountjoy 2,990,822 35.02%
Green Todd Chretien 147,074 1.72%
Libertarian Michael Metti 133,851 1.57%
Peace and Freedom Marsha Feinland 117,764 1.38%
American Independent Don Grundmann 75,350 0.88%
Green Kent Mesplay (write-in) 160 0.00%
Independent Jeffrey Mackler (write-in) 108 0.00%
Independent Lea Sherman (write-in) 47 0.00%
Independent Connor Vlakancic (write-in) 11 0.00%
Invalid or blank votes 357,583 4.19%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%
Democratic hold

United States House of Representatives[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in California, 2006[3][2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 4,720,714 53.05% 34 +1
Republican 3,329,485 37.41% 19 –1
Libertarian 170,711 1.92% 0 0
Green 48,445 0.54% 0 0
Peace and Freedom 27,467 0.31% 0 0
American Independent 11,694 0.13% 0 0
Independent 2,755 0.03% 0 0
Invalid or blank votes 603,243 6.78%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00% 53

Constitutional officers[edit]

Governor[edit]

California gubernatorial election, 2006[4][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger (incumbent) 4,850,157 55.9%
Democratic Phil Angelides 3,376,732 39.0%
Green Peter Camejo 205,995 2.31%
Libertarian Art Olivier 114,329 1.28%
Peace and Freedom Janice Jordan 69,934 0.79%
American Independent Edward Noonan 61,901 0.70%
Republican Robert Newman (write-in) 219 0.00%
Independent James Harris (write-in) 46 0.00%
Independent Donald Etkes (write-in) 43 0.00%
Independent Elisha Shapiro (write-in) 43 0.00%
Independent Vibert Greene (write-in) 18 0.00%
Independent Dealphria Tarver (write-in) 6 0.00%
Invalid or blank votes 219,643 2.47%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 32.77%
Republican hold

Lieutenant Governor[edit]

California lieutenant governor election, 2006[5][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Garamendi 4,189,584 47.08%
Republican Tom McClintock 3,845,858 43.22%
Green Donna Warren 239,107 2.69%
Libertarian Lynnette Shaw 142,851 1.61%
American Independent Jim King 68,446 0.77%
Peace and Freedom Stewart Alexander 43,319 0.49%
Invalid or blank votes 369,894 4.16%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 32.77%
Democratic hold

Secretary of State[edit]

California Secretary of State election, 2006[6][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Debra Bowen 4,032,553 45.31%
Republican Bruce McPherson (incumbent) 3,772,951 42.40%
Green Forrest Hill 181,369 2.04%
Libertarian Gail Lightfoot 171,393 1.93%
American Independent Glenn McMillon 135,824 1.53%
Peace and Freedom Margie Akin 91,483 1.03%
Invalid or blank votes 513,486 5.77%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%
Democratic gain from Republican

State Controller[edit]

California State Controller election, 2006[7][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Chiang 4,232,313 47.56%
Republican Tony Strickland 3,360,611 37.76%
Green Laura Wells 260,047 2.92%
Peace and Freedom Elizabeth Cervantes Barron 212,383 2.39%
Libertarian Donna Tello 188,934 2.12%
American Independent Warren Campbell 106,761 1.12%
Invalid or blank votes 538,010 6.05%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%
Democratic hold

State Treasurer[edit]

California State Treasurer election, 2006[8][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Lockyer 4,523,854 50.84%
Republican Claude Parrish 3,095,615 34.79%
Libertarian Marian Smithson 334,056 3.75%
Green Mehul Thakker 201,670 2.27%
American Independent E. Justin Noonan 93,281 1.05%
Peace and Freedom Jack Harrison 71,726 0.81%
Invalid or blank votes 578,857 6.50%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%
Democratic hold

Attorney General[edit]

California Attorney General election, 2006[9][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Brown 4,756,184 53.45%
Republican Chuck Poochigian 3,220,429 36.19%
Green Michael Wyman 195,130 2.19%
Libertarian Kenneth Weissman 177,469 1.99%
Peace and Freedom Jack Harrison 100,797 1.13%
Invalid or blank votes 449,050 5.05%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%
Democratic hold

Insurance Commissioner[edit]

California Insurance Commissioner election, 2006[10][2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Poizner 4,229,986 47.53%
Democratic Cruz Bustamante 3,204,536 36.01%
Libertarian Dale Ogden 305,772 3.44%
Green Larry Cafiero 270,218 3.04%
Peace and Freedom Tom Condit 187,618 2.11%
American Independent Jay Burden 127,267 1.43%
Invalid or blank votes 573,662 6.45%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%
Republican gain from Democratic

Board of Equalization[edit]

Overview[edit]

California Board of Equalization elections, 2006[11][2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 4,101,849 51.33% 2 0
Republican 3,414,117 42.72% 2 0
Peace and Freedom 276,610 3.46% 0 0
Libertarian 199,306 2.49% 0 0
Invalid or blank votes 907,177 10.19%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00% 4

District 1[edit]

2006 State Board of Equalization District 1 election[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Betty T. Yee 1,508,130 64.94%
Republican David Neighbors 677,942 29.19%
Libertarian Kennita Watson 68,405 2.95%
Peace and Freedom David Campbell 67,697 2.92%
Totals 2,322,174 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

2006 State Board of Equalization District 2 election[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Leonard (incumbent) 1,155,308 55.75%
Democratic Tim Raboy 783,829 37.82%
Peace and Freedom Richard Perry 75,419 3.64%
Libertarian Willard Del Michlin 57,823 2.79%
Totals 2,072,379 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

2006 State Board of Equalization District 3 election[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michelle Steel 1,147,514 56.99%
Democratic Mary Christian-Heising 774,499 38.47%
Peace and Freedom Mary Finley 91,467 4.54%
Totals 2,013,480 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

2006 State Board of Equalization District 4 election[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Judy Chu 1,035,391 65.37%
Republican Glen Forsch 433,353 27.36%
Libertarian Monica Kadera 73,078 4.61%
Peace and Freedom Cindy Henderson 42,027 2.65%
Totals 1,583,849 100.00%
Voter turnout  %
Democratic hold

Judicial system[edit]

Voters are asked to vote on the retention of judicial seats within the Supreme Court of California and the California Courts of Appeal. Both of the two associate justices of the Supreme Court and all 55 judges of the Courts of Appeal retained their seats.

Supreme Court[edit]

Supreme Court Associate Justice seat 1, Joyce Kennard[12]
Vote on retention Votes Percentage
Yes 4,395,470 49.39%
No 1,501,183 16.87%
Invalid or blank votes 3,002,406 33.74%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%
Supreme Court Associate Justice seat 2, Carol Corrigan[12]
Vote on retention Votes Percentage
Yes 4,304,376 48.37%
No 1,483,509 16.67%
Invalid or blank votes 3,111,174 34.96%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00%
Voter turnout 53.93%

California Courts of Appeal[edit]

See California Courts of Appeal elections, 2006.

State Senate[edit]

There are 40 seats in the State Senate, the upper house of California's bicameral State Legislature. For this election, candidates running for even-numbered districts ran for four-year terms. The California Democratic Party maintained its majority control.

California State Senate elections, 2006[13]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 1,903,307 54.19% 25 0
Republican 1,450,607 41.30% 15 0
Libertarian 138,669 3.95% 0 0
Green 13,443 0.38% 0 0
Peace and Freedom 5,573 0.16% 0 0
Independent 911 0.03% 0 0
Totals 3,512,510 100.00% 20

State Assembly[edit]

All 80 biennially-elected seats of the State Assembly, the lower house of California's bicameral State Legislature, were up for election this year. The California Democratic Party retained control of the State Assembly.

California State Assembly elections, 2006[14][2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 4,406,601 49.52% 48 0
Republican 3,524,702 39.61% 32 +1
Libertarian 122,036 1.37% 0 0
Peace and Freedom 29,726 0.33% 0 0
Green 22,472 0.25% 0 0
Independent 51 0.00% 0 0
Vacant[A] 0 –1
Invalid or blank votes 793,471 8.92%
Totals 8,899,059 100.00% 80
A The 67th State Assembly district was left vacant after Republican Tom Harman won a special election to fill the 35th State Senate district on June 12, 2006. There was not enough time to schedule a special election for the Assembly seat, but Republican Jim Silva succeeded him after winning this election.

Statewide ballot propositions[edit]

Thirteen propositions, including five bond measures, qualified to be listed on the general election ballot in California. All five bond measures passed, but only two non-bonds, 83 and the bond-like 84, won approval.

Proposition 1A[edit]

1A would amend the California constitution to limit the conditions under which the transfer of gasoline sales tax revenues from transportation costs to other uses may be allowed. Suspensions would be treated as loans to the General Fund which must be repaid in full, including interest, and suspensions would not be allowed more than twice every ten years. Additionally, all prior suspensions would need to be paid off before another suspension could be put into effect. Proposition 1A passed with 76.6% approval.

Proposition 1B[edit]

1B authorizes the state to sell $20 billion in bonds to fund transportation projects related to congestion, the movement of goods, air quality and transportation security. Proposition 1B passed with 61.3% approval.

Proposition 1C[edit]

1C authorizes the state to sell $2.85 billion in bonds to fund new and existing housing and development programs. Proposition 1C passed with 57.5% approval.

Proposition 1D[edit]

1D allows the state to sell $10.4 billion in bonds to fund construction and building modernization for K-12 schools and institutions of higher education. Proposition 1D passed with 56.6% approval.

Proposition 1E[edit]

1E authorizes the state to sell $4.1 billion in bonds for flood management programs. Proposition 1E passed with 64.0% approval.

Proposition 83[edit]

Increases the severity of punishments for sex crimes in several ways. It broadens the definition of certain sex offenses, lengthens penalties, prohibits probation for some crimes, eliminates early release credits for some offenses, extends parole for some specific sex offenses, and increases court-imposed fees on sex offenders. 83 is a lengthy and complex proposition, a complete summary of which can be found here.[15] Proposition 83 passed with 70.5% approval.

It effectively blocks offenders from living in the vast majority of the areas of large California cities.

Within 24 hours of its passage, its enforcement was blocked by U.S. District Judge Susan Illston, who ruled in a lawsuit filed by an existing offender based on its retroactive nature.[16]

Proposition 84[edit]

Allows the state to sell $5.4 billion in bonds to fund programs for safe water supply and quality, flood control, park improvements and natural resource protection. Proposition 84 passed with 53.8% approval.

Proposition 85[edit]

Amends the state constitution to require, except in certain circumstances, doctors to inform the parent or legal guardians of an unemancipated minor at least 48 hours before an abortion is performed on that minor; a process by which the minor can obtain a legal waiver of the notification requirement is also included in the text. Proposition 85 failed to pass with 45.9% approval.

Proposition 86[edit]

Amends the state constitution to increase the excise tax on tobacco cigarettes by $2.60 per pack, in order to fund healthcare expansion. Proposition 86 failed to pass, with 48.0% approval. [17]

Proposition 87[edit]

Imposes a tax of 1.5% to 6% on oil extracted from California (excluding offshore drilling on federally managed land) with the goal of decreasing petroleum consumption in California by 25%. The $4 billion raised by this tax would go towards research into alternative energy sources, as well as incentives for businesses and vehicle owners utilizing alternative energy and energy efficient technology. Proposition 87 failed to pass with 45.3% approval.

Proposition 88[edit]

Amends the state constitution to allow for a $50 "parcel tax" on the ownership of plots of land (with exclusions for certain elderly or disabled landowners) to provide additional public school funding. Proposition 88 failed to pass with 23.1% approval.

Proposition 89[edit]

Raises income tax on corporations and financial institutions by .2% in order to fund expanded public campaign funding for eligible state office candidates, and imposes new limits on contributions to campaigns. Proposition 89 failed to pass with 25.5% approval.

Proposition 90[edit]

Limits the ability of state or local governments to seize private land for public use, and significantly increases the compensation the government must provide to landowners if new laws result in a change in value to their property. This proposition is part of a national response to the Supreme Court case Kelo v. City of New London, in which the Court asserted the right of governments to seize land for private development if it benefits the public at large. Proposition 90 failed to pass with 47.5% approval.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "United States Senate" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-14. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Registration and Participation" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-18. Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  3. ^ "Congress" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-08-10. 
  4. ^ "Governor" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  5. ^ "Lieutenant Governor" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  6. ^ "Secretary of State" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  7. ^ "State Controller" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  8. ^ "State Treasurer" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-16. 
  9. ^ "Attorney General" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-22. 
  10. ^ "Insurance Commissioner" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-22. 
  11. ^ a b c d e "Board of Equalization" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-23. 
  12. ^ a b "Statement of Vote: 2006 General Election" (PDF). California Secretary of State. 2006-12-18. Retrieved 2008-07-23. 
  13. ^ "State Senate" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2007-01-18. Retrieved 2008-07-26. 
  14. ^ "State Assembly" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2008-07-26. 
  15. ^ http://www.ss.ca.gov/elections/vig_06/general_06/pdf/proposition_83/entire_prop83.pdf
  16. ^ Prop. 83 buffer zone for sex criminals blocked November 9, 2006
  17. ^ League of Women Voters. "Proposition 86: Tax on Cigarettes" (2006).