Call Me When You're Sober

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Call Me When You're Sober"
Single by Evanescence
from the album The Open Door
Released September 13, 2006
Format CD single, digital download, 7" single
Recorded 2006; Record Plant Studios, Los Angeles, California
Genre Alternative metal
Length 3:36
Label Wind-up
Writer(s) Amy Lee, Terry Balsamo
Producer(s) Dave Fortman
Certification Platinum (RIAA)
Gold (ARIA)
Evanescence singles chronology
"Everybody's Fool"
(2004)
"Call Me When You're Sober"
(2006)
"Lithium"
(2007)

"Call Me When You're Sober" is a song by American rock band Evanescence. The song was written by Amy Lee and Terry Balsamo and produced by Dave Fortman and it was included on their second studio album The Open Door. On July 30, 2006 several radio stations played the track before its official physical release as a CD single. Later, on August 15, the song was available for digital download and it was officially released as the first single from the album on September 25, 2006 through their record label Wind-up Records. Lee confirmed that the song was written about her ex-boyfriend Shaun Morgan, the lead singer of the band Seether.

"Call Me When You're Sober" is a moderately fast song which delivers genres from rock music to alternative metal, post-grunge and gothic metal. The song received mixed to positive reviews from music critics who generally praised the instrumentation, the rock sound and Lee's vocals in the song which were described as "strong". "Call Me When You're Sober" peaked at number 10 on the Billboard Hot 100, number 4 on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart, and within the top 20 of several more charts internationally. The single was certified Gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) in 2006 and platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).

The accompanying music video directed by Marc Webb and filmed in Hollywood, Los Angeles was based on the fairy tale Little Red Riding Hood. It portrays Lee and her ex-lover, played by the British actor Oliver Goodwill. Segments of the band performing the song and Lee singing with wolves are also shown during the video. "Call Me When You're Sober" was part of the set list during Evanescence's second worldwide tour, The Open Door Tour. It has been covered by American Idol contestant Gina Glocksen and used in the video game Rock Band.

Background and release[edit]

"The song is very personal.[...] It was very brave for me, the lyric writing, because I was just sick of hiding behind metaphors in all that I had been writing. So much of the record was about the turmoil I was going through, with choosing between happiness and comfort. In the end, I had to choose happiness and health for myself. I made the right decision."

-Amy Lee talking about "Call Me When You're Sober" with MTV News[1]

"Call Me When You're Sober" is written by Amy Lee and Terry Balsamo, and produced by Dave Fortman.[2] It was one of the last songs recorded for The Open Door. Lee's sisters, Carrie and Lori, perform backing vocals during the line "Make up your mind."[2] The song was recorded at Record Plant Studios and mixed at Ocean Way Studios, both in Los Angeles.[2] In an interview with MTV News, Lee said that the song was inspired by her ex-boyfriend Shaun Morgan from the band Seether. She added that it was also inspired by other things that happened in her life, "it was also about the people I was working with that were kind of holding me down and manipulating me and betraying me. I had to put my foot down and walk out the door."[1] Lee further explained the song:

"I think it's impossible to hide how obvious it is. The day that our single hit the airwaves, my ex-boyfriend said he was going into rehab and canceled their tour. I haven't ever said right out who it was about, but it's about the big relationship I was in, and the whole breakup, which was really long. The breaking up and the hard stuff in our relationship happened sort of after I was out of the spotlight for a while and writing. It wasn't in any way public. I was trying to be kind of discreet about it, and then he totally came out and said he was going to rehab. It was shocking to me. It kind of made for a more interesting story."[1]

During a 2011 interview with Spin Lee said, "It's mostly a chick anthem: 'You only want me when you're drunk. You only want me because I'm not there.' I definitely get a lot of girls who are like, 'That's my song. I assigned that ringtone to my ex-boyfriend.'"[3] The track was leaked onto radio on July 30, 2006, causing several radio stations to play the track early and without being released as a CD single.[4] It became available for digital download on September 4, and was officially announced and released as a single on September 25, 2006.[5] Rumors began to surface that Wind-up chose to release the track as a single themselves, which was stated as incorrect by Lee on Evboards.com: "Wind up didn't choose this single- I did, and I had to fight for it. I love this song. Also, they didn't change anything about it. This is the way we made it. We fought over the guitar part but eventually just got the mix right."[6]

Shaun Morgan's reaction[edit]

The same day when the song was released to the radio stations in the United States, Shaun Morgan was sent into rehab for treatment of "a combination of substances."[7] During an interview with MTV News, Morgan revealed that he wasn't thrilled by the song because it followed and it "haunted" him around. He further stated "People would say to me, 'Yeah, man, I know what you're going through,' and I was like, 'No, I don't think you do. 'Your ex-girlfriend didn't write a song about you, that millions of people have heard, saying you're a bad guy. As soon as that happens, buddy, come up and tell me you know what I'm going through.'"[7] Saying that he didn't want to "lower" himself to Lee's level, Morgan further explained his reaction towards the song: "There isn't necessarily a response as there's a lament. I was bummed out. I was really upset that she would say and do those things. In any relationship, I don't think it's right to say and do those things when people break up, and she obviously felt the need to go out there and make me sound like a complete a--hole. What can I do? I just refuse to lower myself to that level. But it was a painful thing and it got me down — people coming up to me on the street and referring to that song. But I didn't feel the need to write back and be mean."[7]

When asked about is there an inspiration between his relationship with Lee on Seether's song "Breakdown" from their album Finding Beauty in Negative Spaces, (2007) Morgan stated, "It isn't an aggressive song, and it isn't even an angry song – I would prefer to refer to it as a lament rather than an angry backlash. You couldn't tell that the song was about one person. It's probably more universal. I prefer to be a little more vague and respectful. There are some things I could have said and done too – there are always two sides to every story. And if anything, the song says, 'Fine. Go ahead and say those things.' But what's the point of telling my side? That's what the bloodthirsty want, and I don't care what the bloodthirsty want."[7] He explained people's expectations to find a song on the album influenced by Lee "These songs are turning out to be somewhat more introspective, which is weird – you'd assume I'd be more pissed off and have more things to say. I don't know how much I want to say and what I want to say. It's tough, because I know what the expectations are for this album and that people will be looking for that Amy Lee reference, and I am trying desperately not to have any. I just ended another truly, truly horrible relationship with somebody, so if there's anything about somebody on the record, it would be about her, not Amy."[7]

Lee performing the song during the Evanescence Tour.

Composition[edit]

According to the sheet music published by Alfred Publishing on the website Musicnotes.com, "Call Me When You're Sober" is a rock, alternative metal, post-grunge, and gothic metal song written in the key of E minor.[8] It is set in common time and performed in a moderately fast tempo of 96 beats per minute. Lee's vocal range in the song spans from the musical note of G3 to Eb5.[8] Kelefa Sanneh of The New York Times said that "Call Me When You're Sober" uses different genres such as piano balladry, nu-metal, symphonic rock and electronic pop.[9] It starts as a "piano ballad, swerves into hard rock, then builds to a grandiose pop-orchestral refrain, and later on a glorious, glimmering bridge."[10] During an interview with MTV News, Lee revealed the inspiration behind the song saying, "It's very obvious who it's about. I know that people would read between the lines and think it's about my ex-boyfriend Shaun Morgan [of Seether], but I wanted to be completely clear. I needed so bad to say exactly what I was feeling for so long. Music is therapy for me. It's my outlet for every negative thing I've ever been through. It lets me turn something bad into something beautiful."[11]

With no effort to hide her still-raw emotions, Lee accuses her lover, "Don't cry to me/ If you loved me/ You would be here with me/ Don't lie to me/ Just get your things/ I've made up your mind."[12] "Call Me When You're Sober" uses the lyrics "You never call me when you're sober/ You only want it cause it's over," which is directed towards her ex-boyfriend.[13] According to a writer from the website Contactmusic.com, she wrote the song to "vent her frustration" and a writer of The Daily Princetonian concluded that it was aimed towards her ex-boyfriend.[14][15] The Guardian's Caroline Sullivan concluded that the song was written for Evanescence's former guitarist, Ben Moody.[16] In the song, Lee further explains why the relationship won't work "or hoping that he'll crash and burn and finally learn a lesson."[17] She further sings the lines "Don't cry to me … If you loved me, you would be here with me / … How could I have burned paradise? How could I … you were never mine" during the bridge of the song.[18]

Reception[edit]

Critical reception[edit]

The song received general acclaim from contemporary critics. Bill Lamb of the website About.com gave the song four out of five stars stating, "It is great to hear rock power chords that radio will play".[19] He described the song: "There's a bit more zip in tempo than some of the past Evanescence favorites, but otherwise little has changed. Amy Lee's throaty voice soars over crunchy power chords that give way to quiet, contemplative moments."[19] In his review of The Open Door he put the song in the list of Top Tracks on The Open Door alongside "Sweet Sacrifice", "Your Star", "Good Enough" and "Lacrymosa".[20] R.J. Carter from the website The Trades said that "Call Me When You're Sober" has a perfect intro that shows Lee's vocal ability and added that the song is "the album's standout performance".[21] The Boston Globe called the song a "hard - charging opening salvo".[22] Brendan Butler from Cinema Blend called "Call Me When You're Sober" the "most-friendly radio song" along with "Sweet Sacrifice". He noted that those are the only two songs that "don't excruciatingly wane after a minute".[23] The New York Times' Kelefa Sanneh praised Lee's voice in the song, adding that she sounds terrific which "crashes through different styles while remaining diabolically hummable."[9] She added that the song is a classical Evanescence song, which according to her was a "bombastic, meticulously produced ([Ms.] Lee's vocals are doubled for the second stanza), unreasonably addictive".[10]

While reviewing The Open Door, Rob Sheffield of Rolling Stone called "Call Me When You're Sober" a "suit breakup song."[24] Later while reviewing their third self-titled studio album Evanescence (2011) Nick Catucci of the same publication noted that there was "nothing as saucy as the last album's hit, 'Call Me When You're Sober.'"[25] Simon Cosyn from The Sun said that the song is a great put-down and "It charts her [Lee's] personal break-up with Shaun Morgan... and his problems with booze."[26] The Courier-Mail's Jason Nahrung, noted that the song was remiscent to her work with Moody stating that it uses "heavy bass and drums, spotless and lavish production and Lee's unmistakable vocals."[27] A writer of Canada.com concluded that the band showed their power on the "biting single".[28] Allmusic's Stephen Thomas Erlewine highlighted the song saying that it had structure, hooks and momentum.[29] Nicholas Fonseca of Entertainment Weekly called "Call Me When You're Sober" an "angry-goth anthem".[30] Ed Thompson of IGN put the song on his list "Definitely Download" adding that it was "familiar to anyone who has listened to the radio at any point in the past two months."[31]

In more negative reviews, Michael Endelman from Entertainment Weekly gave the song a C stating, "The sound of a woman scorned? Very mild, guessing from unmemorable kiss-off, 'Call Me When You're Sober.' Evanescence frontwoman Amy Lee's latest pop-metal melodrama never lives up to the great title, as the melody hovers in a holding pattern."[32] Alex Nunn from musicOMH showed incredulity that the "angelic-vocalled woman" who wrote "My Immortal" could "churn out such dross as Call Me When You're Sober" and added, "musically it's power chords and big riffs-ahoy, generic, mundane, boring stuff."[33] In another review, he said that "Call Me When You're Sober" hints that "Evanescence are a mere shadow of the band they used to be."[34] Jenni Cole of the same publication concluded that there was nothing to recommend on the song and added that it was a "disappointing return" for the band.[35]

Recognition[edit]

Bill Lamb of About.com put the song at number 3 on his list of "Top 10 Most Annoying Pop Songs of 2006" saying, "It was good to hear the voice of Amy Lee from Evanescence back on the radio this fall...for the first 3 or 4 times. After play 12 or 13 it all just sounds like unnecessary histrionics. Let's dig down deep for something new in the Evanescence repertoire."[36] However, he later put the song at number 72 on his list of Top 100 Pop Songs of 2006 adding that the song "sounds a bit too much like we've heard it before."[37] "Call Me When You're Sober" was placed at number 10 on VH1's list of "Top 40 of 2006".[38] The song was nominated in the category for Favorite Rock Song at the 33rd People's Choice Awards.[39]

Chart performance[edit]

For the week ending September 2, 2006, "Call Me When You're Sober" debuted at number 25 on the Billboard Hot 100[40] and at number 11 on the Hot Digital Songs chart.[41] It moved at number 10 the next week, which later became its peak position.[42][43] It became the band's third top ten single on the chart,[44] and it spent a total of seventeen weeks.[44][45] "Call Me When You're Sober" ranked at number 77 on the Hot 100 year-end chart, a lower position than that of the band's previous singles, "Bring Me to Life" and "My Immortal".[46] It was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on February 17, 2009, selling more than 1 million copies.[47]

"Call Me When You're Sober" debuted at number 32 on UK Singles Chart for the week ending September 30, 2006,[48] and the next week it moved at number 4 which later became its peak positions.[49] It spent a total of 8 weeks on the chart and it was last seen at number 69 on November 11, 2006.[50] On the year-end chart in the United Kingdom, the song was placed at number 139.[51] It ranked on number 5 on ARIA's list of most played songs in 2007.[52]

Music video[edit]

In the music video for "Call Me When You're Sober", Amy Lee is shown with wolves which refers to the fairy tale Little Red Riding Hood.

A music video directed by Marc Webb[53] and filmed in Hollywood, Los Angeles in July,[54] was released on August 7, 2006.[53] The video and Amy Lee's theme is based on the fairy tale Little Red Riding Hood. During an interview with MTV News, Lee described the music video saying, "the song is so literal, the lyrics and everything – I mean, obviously, just by the title – that we felt like the video would have the freedom to go in a less literal direction. So it's [a modern re-imagining of] Little Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf and sort of a more cool, superhero, rock and roll Little Red Riding Hood."[55] According to an interview behind the scenes of the video, the director wanted Lee to straddle her "ex-lover" in the video, but Lee, opposed to selling sex, refused. Lee jokingly said, "You can't blame a guy for trying."[56] Each of the wolves used in the video had personal trainers. Despite Lee's allergy to the wolves in the video she "pet them and [sang] to them".[55][57] She further explained the shooting with the wolves:

"These live wolves came in, and they each had trainers and it was really fun.[...] I thought it was really cool, but then when they came in, they were 150 pounds. So I was like, 'Wow, if I got on all fours, I'd be about the same size as this huge animal.' But it was me and the wolves in the room, and it was all cool. It was awesome. My allergies kicked in, but I powered through. And then we shot the scene at the vanity with the Big Bad Wolf coming over my shoulders and trying to seduce me."[55]

The video begins with Lee wearing a red satin cape, and singing while sitting on opposite ends of a dining table with her "lover", played by British actor Oliver Goodwill. Lee is then shown standing in front of a mirror while her "lover" comes behind her; he starts to massage her shoulders and prepares to kiss her, but Lee refuses, saying that he is "too late". This cuts to Lee and four back-up dancers descending a staircase, where upon reaching the bottom, first Lee then the dancers are lifted into the air. At the end of the song, Lee walks atop the length of the dining table, while chairs and tabletop items are flung aside as she passes. She reaches her "lover" at the end, places her finger on his lips, and sings "I've made up your mind". Shots of the band performing and of Lee sitting with wolves are interspersed amongst the other elements of the video. Initially planned to be filmed at the end of June, the music video was delayed after filming did not begin until the second week of July.[58] It premiered on MTV, MTV2, VH1 and Fuse TV in the United States; and on MuchOnDemand in Canada. It managed to peak at number 1 on MTV's Total Request Live (TRL).[59] Corey Moss of MTV News concluded that the video "was an abstract take on somewhat literal lyrics."[54] The music video for "Call Me When You're Sober" was nominated in the category for Best International Video by a Group at the 2007 MuchMusic Video Awards.[60] It was also nominated in the category for Best Video at the 2007 NRJ Music Awards.[61]

Live performances[edit]

Amy Lee performing in 2007 during the band's second worldwide tour, The Open Door Tour.

The song was included on the set list of the band's The Open Door Tour.[62][63] According to Donnie Moorhouse of The Republican, the song receives a "full band treatment" during the performances.[64] While reviewing a concert by the band, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's Jon M. Gilbertson said that the title "pushes away from rock's party mood".[65] However, he praised Lee's live performance of the song saying that she "projected so loudly and clearly that she seemed to be trying to reach well beyond the confines of the Eagles Ballroom, and she hit the notes throughout the set. No screaming or growling, in other words."[65] Chris Harris of Rolling Stone described the performance of the song as having "everyone in the place headbanging along with Lee, whose hair whipped in circles wildly as she belted out the chorus."[66]

During the Family Values Tour 2007, Evanescence performed "Call Me When You're Sober" on July 30, 2007 in Mansfield along with Korn. They had a 65-minute set during the show and Sarah Rodman of The Boston Globe praised their performance saying "'Call Me When You're Sober' was a seething highpoint, with Lee heaving and hurling her bitterness like so much china at a betrayer's head."[67] On the 2006 Jingle Ball, Evanescence performed "Going Under" and "Call Me When You're Sober". Before starting to sing the song, Lee announced: "We're going to do something completely different from everyone else tonight — and rock as hard as we can."[68] During the performance she was "bending over and pumping her fist" as stated by Kelefa Sanneh of The New York Times.[68] Later the band performed the song during the 2009 Maquinária Festival in São Paulo, Brazil.[66] In 2011, the band added the song to the set list of their third worldwide tour in support of their third self-titled studio album Evanescence (2011).[13][69] They also performed "Call Me When You're Sober" during the 2011 Rock in Rio festival on October 2, 2011.[70]

Covers and usage in media[edit]

Gina Glocksen, a contestant of the sixth season of the reality show American Idol performed the song live.[71] Talking about her cover of the song Lee said, "It's such a surreal thing watching other people perform your songs in the first place, but people that you don't even know on TV doing 'American Idol' and Paula Abdul commenting on it is just a whole other thing. It was pretty hilarious, just 'cause it's our song, but I don't think she did a bad job."[72] Jim Cantiello of MTV News praised Glocksen's performance saying that she "could kick Amy Lee's butt in a cage match".[73] A writer of Rolling Stone described the cover as "passable enough".[74] "Bring Me to Life", "Call Me When You're Sober" and "Weight of the World" were included in the game Rock Band.[75] D.J Nate, an American disc jockey made a remix of the song.[76]

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from The Open Door liner notes.[2]

Track listing[edit]

  • CD single (2006 UK 6-track enhanced 2-CD single set) - Released September 2006
  1. "Call Me When You're Sober" (Album version) - 3:34
  2. "Call Me When You're Sober" (Acoustic version) - 3:37
  1. "Call Me When You're Sober" (Album version) - 3:34
  2. "Call Me When You're Sober" (Acoustic version) - 3:37
  3. "Making of the Video" (Video clip) - 5:20
  4. "Call Me When You're Sober" (Music video) - 3:33
  • Vinyl single (2006 UK limited edition 2-track 7" vinyl single) - Released September 2006[79]
  1. "Call Me When You're Sober" (Album version) - 3:34
  2. "Call Me When You're Sober" (Acoustic version) - 3:37

Charts and certifications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Harris, Chris (August 10, 2006). "Evanescence Set For Fall Tour; Amy Lee Reveals Inspiration Behind 'Sober'". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved June 21, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d The Open Door (liner notes). Evanescence. Wind-up Records. 2006. 
  3. ^ Dodero, Camille (September 11, 2011). "Tough Questions for Evanescence's Amy Lee". Spin (Spin Media LLC). Retrieved September 21, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Evanescence's New Single "Call Me When You're Sober" Made Available to US Radio via Digital Distribution". Orlando, Florida: Vocus. August 1, 2006. Retrieved June 27, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Evanescence grows up". New Musical Express. Time Inc. July 27, 2006. Retrieved August 13, 2006. 
  6. ^ "Call Me When You're Sober - Page 79 - EvBoard - Evanescence Forum". EvBoard. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Harris, Chris (July 18, 2007). "Seether Frontman Won't Respond To Amy Lee's Attack: 'I Just Refuse To Lower Myself To That Level'". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b "Evanescence - Call Me When You're Sober Sheet Music (Digital Download)". Musicnotes.com. Alfred Music Publishing. Retrieved June 10, 2011. 
  9. ^ a b Sanneh, Kelefa (October 2, 2006). "Critics' choice - New CD's". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved June 23, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b Sanneh, Kelefa (August 3, 2006). "Evanescence and the Kllers Get Ready for Their Encores". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved June 26, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Evanescence: Amy Lee Explains the New Songs". VH1. Viacom. August 9, 2006. Retrieved June 10, 2011. 
  12. ^ Berry, Sara (October 13, 2006). "Evanescence makes welcome return through 'The Open Door'". St. Louis Post-Dispatch (Lee Enterprises). Retrieved June 20, 2011. 
  13. ^ a b Escudero, Nicki (October 2, 2006). "Amy Lee wants you to walk into her world". The Arizona Republic (Gannett Company). Retrieved June 23, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Lee reveals Sober inspiration". Contactmusic.com. August 14, 2006. Retrieved June 25, 2911. 
  15. ^ "Bare-boned Evanescence album lacks heart". The Daily Princetonian (Trustees of The Daily Princetonian Publishing Company). November 9, 2006. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  16. ^ Sullivan, Caroline (November 22, 2006). "Evanescence - Hammersmith Apollo, London". The Guardian (Guardian Media Group). Retrieved November 14, 2011. 
  17. ^ "The Open Door - Evanescence". Stornoway Gazette. October 20, 2006. Retrieved June 25, 2011. 
  18. ^ Farias, Andree (January 1, 2006). "The Open Door". Christianity Today. Christianity Today International. p. 1. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  19. ^ a b Lamb, Bill. "Evanescence Call Me When You're Sober - Review of Call Me When You're Sober by Evanescence". About.com. The New York Times Company. Retrieved June 10, 2011. 
  20. ^ Lamb, Bill. "Evanescence - The Open Door: Review The Open Door, the Second Album From Evanescence". About.com. The New York Times Company. Retrieved June 10, 2011. 
  21. ^ Carter, R.J. (October 15, 2006). "Music Review: Evanescence, The Open Door". The Trades. Retrieved June 21, 2011. 
  22. ^ "For Evanescence, black is the new black". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). October 3, 2006. Retrieved June 23, 2011. 
  23. ^ Butler, Brendan (October 3, 2006). "CD Review: Evanescence's The Open Door". Cinema Blend. Retrieved June 23, 2011. 
  24. ^ Sheffield, Rob (October 5, 2006). "The Open Door by Evanescence - Album Review". Rolling Stone. Wenner Media. Retrieved November 21, 2011. 
  25. ^ Catucci, Nick (October 11, 2011). "Evanescence - Album Reviews". Rolling Stone (Wenner Media). Retrieved November 21, 2011. 
  26. ^ Cosyns, Simon (October 6, 2006). "Amy Lee:I'm my own therapist". The Sun (News International). Retrieved June 23, 2011. 
  27. ^ Nahrung, Jason (October 19, 2006). "Evanescence still shining". The Courier-Mail (News Limited). Retrieved June 12, 2011. 
  28. ^ "'Open Door' to likeable return of Evanescence". Canada.com Postmedia News (Postmedia Network Inc.). November 11, 2006. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  29. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "allmusic (((The Open Door> Overview )))". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  30. ^ Fonseca, Nicholas (March 16, 2007). "The Odds Squad - American Idol". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc.). Retrieved June 26, 2011. 
  31. ^ Thompson, Ed (October 4, 2006). "Evanescence - The Open Door". IGN. News Corporation. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  32. ^ Endelman, Michael (September 22, 2006). "Call Me When You're Sober Review". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Retrieved June 10, 2011. 
  33. ^ Nunn, Alex (2006). "Evanescence - The Open Door". musicOMH. Retrieved 2011-06-21. 
  34. ^ Nunn, Alex. "Evanescence - Lithium". musicOMH. Retrieved June 26, 2011. 
  35. ^ Cole, Jenni. "Evanescence - Call Me When You're Sober | track reviews". MusicOMH. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  36. ^ Lamb, Bill. "Top 10 Most Annoying Pop Songs of 2006". About.com. The New York Times Company. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  37. ^ Lamb, Bill. "Top 100 Pop Songs 2006". About.com. The New York Times Company. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  38. ^ "Top 40 of 2006". VH1. Viacom. Archived from the original on September 22, 2011. Retrieved December 11, 2008. 
  39. ^ "People's Choice Awards Nominees Announced". The Washington Post (Beverly Hills, California: The Washington Post Company). November 7, 2006. Retrieved July 1, 2011. 
  40. ^ "Hot 100: Week Ending September 2, 2006". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 21, 2011. 
  41. ^ "Digital Songs: Week Ending September 2, 2006". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 21, 2011. 
  42. ^ "Hot 100 - Week of September 09, 2006". Billboard. Promehteus Global Media. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  43. ^ a b c "Evanescence - Billboard Singles". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  44. ^ a b Titus, Christa (June 20, 2011). "Amy Lee: New Evanescence Album is 'Much More of a Band Collaboration'". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved June 21, 2011. 
  45. ^ "Call Me When You're Sober - Evanescence". Billboard. Promehteus Global Media. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  46. ^ a b "The Billboard Hot 100 Singles & Tracks - 2006 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  47. ^ a b "Gold & Platinum Search Results". Recording Industry Association of America. February 17, 2009. Retrieved April 7, 2009. 
  48. ^ "Archive Chart". UK Singles Chart. The Official Charts Company. September 30, 2006. Retrieved July 1, 2011. 
  49. ^ a b "7, 2006/ Archive Chart" UK Singles Chart. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  50. ^ "Chart Stats - Evanescence - Call Me When You're Sober". Chart Stats. The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on April 9, 2012. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  51. ^ a b "UK Year-End Chart 2006" (PDF). The Official Charts Company. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  52. ^ "Pink most played artist on Australian radio, TV, pubs". News Limited. December 28, 2007. Retrieved January 16, 2008. 
  53. ^ a b "Booked: Evanescence - Marc Webb, director". Video Static. July 6, 2006. Retrieved July 30, 2006. 
  54. ^ a b Moss, Corey (November 2, 2006). "After Facing Big Bad Wolf, Amy Lee Faces Herself In Evanescence Clip". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  55. ^ a b c Harris, Chris (July 31, 2006). "Evanescence's Amy Lee Isn't Afraid Of Big Bad Wolf in 'Sober Clip". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved June 23, 2011. 
  56. ^ "Call Me When You're Sober" - Making of the Video. Note: The video can be found on the second version of the CD single. Retrieved July 31, 2011
  57. ^ McCabe, Kathy (September 28, 2006). "Amy Lee's opening doors". News Limited. Retrieved June 26, 2011. 
  58. ^ O'Donnell, Jane (April 27, 2007). "A.M. Surf Report: Britney's Got A Big Secret; 'Idol' Elbows Gwen And Pink; Snoop Still Loves Australia". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  59. ^ "The TRL Archive - Number Ones". ATRL.com. Retrieved July 1, 2011. 
  60. ^ "Evanescence - Call Me When You're Sober". MuchMusic. Bell Media. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  61. ^ "Aguilera And Evanescence Leads Nrj Nominations". Contactmusic.com. October 29, 2006. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  62. ^ Curtis, Larry D. (October 27, 2006). "Amy Lee bewitches Evanescence fans". Deseret News (Deseret News Publishing Company). Retrieved June 26, 2011. 
  63. ^ Massimo, Rick (April 5, 2007). "Amy Lee cements her status as the core of Evanescence". The Providence Journal (A. H. Belo Corporation). Retrieved June 25, 2011. 
  64. ^ Moorhouse, Donnie (April 4, 2007). "Amy Lee rises above Evanescence". The Republican (Advance Publications). Retrieved June 15, 2011. 
  65. ^ a b M. Gilbertson, Jon (October 16, 2006). "Lee bring Evanescence to life". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Journal Communications). Retrieved June 16, 2011. 
  66. ^ a b Harris, Chris (November 5, 2009). "Evanescence Return to the Stage at "Secret" New York Gig". Rolling Stone (Wenner Media). Retrieved June 10, 2011. 
  67. ^ Rodman, Sarah (July 30, 2007). "Evanescence, Korn 'Family Values' metal". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Retrieved June 15, 2011. 
  68. ^ a b Sanneh, Kelefa (December 18, 2006). "Jingle Ball - Music - Review". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved July 31, 2011. 
  69. ^ Florino, Rick (October 12, 2011). "Live Review: Evanescence — The Palladium, Hollywood". Artistdirect. Retrieved November 21, 2011. 
  70. ^ Ribeiro, Guilherme (October 2, 2011). "Evanescence toca o bom básico no Rock in Rio" (in Portuguese). MTV Brasil. MTV Networks. Retrieved October 4, 2011. 
  71. ^ Slezak, Michael (March 8, 2007). "Now That's What I Call Music! Recap". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc.). Retrieved June 26, 2011. 
  72. ^ Moss, Corey (March 26, 2007). "Evanescence's Lee Laughs At 'Idol,' Promises Less Fluff In 'Sweet' Clip". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  73. ^ Cantiello, Jim (March 8, 2007). "'Idol' Recap: Simon Says Antonella's Time Is Up, Melinda Aces It Again". MTV News. MTV Networks. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  74. ^ "Blogging "American Idol": Girls Gone Wild". Rolling Stone (Wenner Media). March 8, 2007. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  75. ^ Hartley, Adam (June 15, 2009). "Classic Spinal tunes on Rock Band". Future plc. Retrieved June 15, 2011. 
  76. ^ "Spin's 5 Best New Artists for January". Spin (Spin Media LLC). January 3, 2011. p. 2. Retrieved September 22, 2011. 
  77. ^ "Call Me When You're Sober". EIL.com. Retrieved December 11, 2008. 
  78. ^ "Call Me When You'Re Sober [Single, Maxi]". Amazon.de. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  79. ^ "Call Me When You're Sober [Single, Import]". Amazon.com. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  80. ^ "Australian-charts.com – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  81. ^ "Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober – Austriancharts.at" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  82. ^ "Ultratop.be – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober" (in Dutch). Ultratip. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  83. ^ "Ultratop.be – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober" (in French). Ultratip. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  84. ^ "Canadian BDS Airplay". Jam!. Quebecor. Retrieved August 24, 2006. 
  85. ^ "Evanescence Album & Song Chart History" European Hot 100 for Evanescence. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  86. ^ "ČNS IFPI" (in Czech). Hitparáda – Radio Top 100 Oficiální. IFPI Czech Republic. Note: insert {{{year}}}{{{week}}} into search. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  87. ^ "Evanescence: Call Me When You're Sober" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  88. ^ "Lescharts.com – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober" (in French). Les classement single. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  89. ^ "Die ganze Musik im Internet: Charts, News, Neuerscheinungen, Tickets, Genres, Genresuche, Genrelexikon, Künstler-Suche, Musik-Suche, Track-Suche, Ticket-Suche – musicline.de" (in German). Media Control Charts. PhonoNet GmbH. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  90. ^ "Chart Track". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  91. ^ "Italiancharts.com – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober". Top Digital Download. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  92. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – Evanescence search results" (in Dutch) Dutch Top 40. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  93. ^ "Charts.org.nz – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  94. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober". VG-lista. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  95. ^ "Swedishcharts.com – Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober". Singles Top 60. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  96. ^ "Evanescence – Call Me When You're Sober – swisscharts.com". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  97. ^ "Evanescence Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot 100 for Evanescence. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  98. ^ "Evanescence Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Pop Songs for Evanescence. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  99. ^ "Evanescence Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Adult Pop Songs for Evanescence. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  100. ^ "Pop Rock" (in Spanish). Record Report. November 4, 2006. Archived from the original on November 24, 2006. 
  101. ^ "Pandora Archive Year End Charts 2006" (PDF). ARIA Charts. Pandora Archive. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  102. ^ "ARIA Charts - End Of Year Charts - Top 100 Singles 2006". Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  103. ^ "Dutch Top 40 Year End Chart - 2003". MegaCharts. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  104. ^ "I singoli più venduti del 2006" (in Italian). Federation of the Italian Music Industry. Hit Parade Italy. Retrieved September 23, 2011. 
  105. ^ "Swiss Year End Charts 2006". Swiss Music Charts. Hung Medien. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  106. ^ "The Billboard Hot Digital Songs - 2006 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  107. ^ "The Billboard Hot Digital Tracks - 2006 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  108. ^ "The Billboard Pop 100 - 2006 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  109. ^ "Best of 2006:Alternative Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved December 31, 2011. 
  110. ^ "The Billboard Pop 100 - 2007 Year End Charts". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  111. ^ "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2006 Singles". Australian Recording Industry Association. 2006. Retrieved May 5, 2009. 

External links[edit]