Callagiddy

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Callagiddy is located in Western Australia
Callagiddy
Callagiddy
Location in Western Australia

Coordinates: 25°03′04″S 114°01′41″E / 25.051°S 114.028°E / -25.051; 114.028 (Callagiddy) Callagiddy Station, commonly referred to as Callagiddy is a pastoral lease that operates as a cattle station in the Western Australia.

It is situated about 41 kilometres (25 mi) south east of Carnarvon and 109 kilometres (68 mi) north east of Denham in the Gascoyne region.

The property was established prior to 1904 and in 1905 was owned by Messrs Powell and McNish who were running sheep on Callagiddy.[1] The partnership was dissolved in 1906 with Dan Powell taking full ownership.[2] Powell sold the property in 1909 to Messrs Jackman and Balston for £16,500, at the time it was stocked with 11,000 sheep.[3] H. Farrar was appointed manager in 1910 of Callagiddy after three years at Minilya Station.[4] Later the same year 10,000 sheep were shorn producing 168 bales of wool.[5]

A large portion of the property was burned in 1923 by bushfires. Surrounding properties including Jimba Jimba, Boologooroo, Brick House, Minilya and Wandagee also lost large areas of grassland in the blaze.[6] More bushfires swept through the area in 1927 with Callagiddy, Brick House, Doorawarrah, Ella Valla and other properties all losing large areas of feed to the fires.[7]

Jackman sold the property in 1930 for £37,000 to the Waite family. The 160,000 acres (64,750 ha) property was stocked with 16,000 sheep at the time.[8]

Peter Johnston took over management of the family station in 1985 and had full ownership by 1987. The property was running Dorper and Damara sheep along with cattle and had diversified into growing sweetcorn, sorghum and sunflowers.[9]

The property was placed on the market in 2013 and occupied an area of 654 square kilometres (253 sq mi) with a high carrying capacity. The property currently carries goats as well as cattle and has area suitable for horticulture with good artesian water supply.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stock and Station news". Northern Times (Carnarvon, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 2 September 1905. p. 2. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  2. ^ "Advertising.". Northern Times (Carnarvon, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 10 November 1906. p. 2. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  3. ^ "Stock and Station news". Northern Times (Carnarvon, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 7 August 1909. p. 2. Retrieved 8 January 2014. 
  4. ^ "Shearing - A suggestion". Northern Times (Carnarvon, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 25 June 1910. p. 2. Retrieved 8 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "Callagiddy". Northern Times (Carnarvon, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 19 November 1910. p. 2. Retrieved 8 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "Serious Bush Fires.". Sunday Times (Perth, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 25 November 1923. p. 14 Section: First Section. Retrieved 8 January 2014. 
  7. ^ "Bush fires at Carnarvon". Western Argus (Kalgoorlie, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 27 December 1927. p. 23. Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "Sheep Station sold". The Daily News (Perth, Western Australia: National Library of Australia). 20 February 1930. p. 8. Retrieved 9 January 2014. 
  9. ^ "Pastoral Lines - Issue 7". Government of Western Australia. 2010. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  10. ^ "Great Northern Highway Carnarvon WA". realeastate.com.au. 2013. Retrieved 20 December 2013.