Camellia × williamsii

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Camellia × williamsii
Camellia x williamsii 'Mary Christian'.jpg
Camellia × williamsii 'Mary Christian' in Real Jardín Botánico, Madrid, Spain.
Genus Camellia
Species Camellia × williamsii
Cultivar group × williamsii
Origin Originally bred in Cornwall by J.C Williams.[1]

Camellia × williamsii is a cultivar group of hybrid evergreen shrubs that are derived from a crossing of Camellia saluenensis with Camellia japonica.[1] It was originally bred in Cornwall by John Charles Williams.

Cultivars[edit]

More than 100 named cultivars have been bred.[1]

The following cultivars have gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit:-

Name Flower colour Size Ref.
Anticipation rose-pink 10m² [2]
Bowen Bryant pink 16m² [3]
Brigadoon pink 10m² [4]
China Clay white 06m² [5]
Daintiness salmon pink 10m² [6]
Debbie rose pink 16m² [7]
Donation pink 64m² [8]
E.T.R. Carlyon white 10m² [9]
Elegant Beauty rose pink 10m² [10]
Elsie Jurey rose pink 10m² [11]
George Blandford pink 16m² [12]
Glenn's Orbit deep pink 16m² [13]
J.C. Williams pale pink 16m² [14]
Jurey's Yellow white/yellow 16m² [15]
Les Jury crimson 04m² [16]
Muskoka pink/red 16m² [17]
Saint Ewe rose pink 16m² [18]
Water Lily rose pink 10m² [19]

Gallery[edit]

Cultivation[edit]

C. × williamsii is an excellent companion to other ericaceous woodland plants such as rhododendron. It grows best in acid soil, ph5.5-6.5, in a sunny or partially shaded, sheltered position. In areas with frost and cold winds, it should be positioned facing away from the morning sun, as the flower buds are easily damaged.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Rowell, Raymond J. (1980). Ornamental Flowering Shrubs in Australia. Australia: AH & AW Reed Pty Ltd. ISBN 0589501771. 
  2. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Anticipation'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Bowen Bryant'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Brigadoon'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'China Clay'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Daintiness'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Debbie'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Donation'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'E.T.R. Carlyon'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  10. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Elegant Beauty'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  11. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Elsie Jurey'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  12. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'George Blandford'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  13. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Glenn's Orbit'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'J.C. Williams'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Jurey's Yellow'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  16. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Les Jurey'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  17. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Muskoka'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Saint Ewe'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  19. ^ "Camellia × williamsii 'Water Lily'". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  20. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964.