Cameroon–China relations

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Sino-Cameroonian relations
Map indicating locations of Cameroon and China

Cameroon

China

The People's Republic of China and Cameroon first established bilateral relations on March 26, 1971. Cameroon is an adherent to PR China's One China Policy.[1]

Political relations[edit]

The People's Republic established relations with Cameroon in 1971. In the 2000s, leading politicians paid state visits to and from each country; these included Cameroonian President Paul Biya's visit for a conference in 2006 and Hu Jintao's visit to Cameroon in 2007.[1]

Economic development[edit]

Since the first Forum on China Africa Cooperation in 2000, Beijing has successfully delivered $2.4 billion in development finance to Cameroon.[2] $87 million of that total falls under the OECD-DAC criteria for Official Development Assistance. Major projects executed by the Chinese government in Cameroon include:

  • Construction of the Kribi Deep Seaport funded by a FCFA 207,270 billion loan from the Exim Bank of China[3]
  • A FCFA 243 billion loan from China Exim bank for construction of the Memve'ele hydroelectric Dam in Nyabizan[4]
  • Construction of a malaria research center at Yaounde's Hospital of Gynecology, Obstetrics, and Pediatrics[5]

Yearly trade topped 854 million US dollars in 2008, before dropping to 813 million US dollars in 2009 due to the global recession.[1]

Criticism[edit]

In the 2000s, some in Cameroon considered the economic relationship to be a form of neo-colonialism; this was mainly due to a perception that Chinese traders flooded the Cameroonian market with cheap but extremely fragile manufactured goods, which stymied the development of local industries.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Backgrounder: Relations between China, Cameroon People's Daily Online, March 23, 2010
  2. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects?utf8=%E2%9C%93&search=&active_string%5B%5D=Active&country_name%5B%5D=Cameroon&scope_names%5B%5D=Official+Finance
  3. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects/350
  4. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects/289
  5. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development. http://aiddatachina.org/projects/22850
  6. ^ China Invades Country With Cheap, Fragile Goods AllAfrica.com via postnewsline.com, 28 August 2008