Cameroon–China relations

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sino-Cameroonian relations
Map indicating locations of Cameroon and China

Cameroon

China

China and Cameroon established bilateral relations on March 26, 1971. Cameroon is an adherent to the One China Policy.[1]

Political relations[edit]

Embassy of Cameroon in China

The People's Republic established relations with Cameroon in 1971. In the 2000s, leading politicians paid state visits to and from each country; these included Cameroonian President Paul Biya's visit for a conference in 2006 and Hu Jintao's visit to Cameroon in 2007.[1]

Chinese Foreign Minister, Wang Yi, is scheduled to visit Cameroon on 12 January, 2014.[2]

Economic development[edit]

Since the first Forum on China Africa Cooperation in 2000, Beijing has successfully delivered $2.4 billion in development finance to Cameroon.[3] $87 million of that total falls under the OECD-DAC criteria for Official Development Assistance. Major projects executed by the Chinese government in Cameroon include:

  • Construction of the Kribi Deep Seaport funded by a FCFA 207,270 billion loan from the Exim Bank of China[4]
  • A FCFA 243 billion loan from China Exim bank for construction of the Memve'ele hydroelectric Dam in Nyabizan[5]
  • Construction of a malaria research center at Yaounde's Hospital of Gynecology, Obstetrics, and Pediatrics[6]

Yearly trade topped 854 million US dollars in 2008, before dropping to 813 million US dollars in 2009 due to the global recession.[1]

Criticism[edit]

In the 2000s, some in Cameroon considered the economic relationship to be a form of neo-colonialism; this was mainly due to a perception that Chinese traders flooded the Cameroonian market with cheap but extremely fragile manufactured goods, which stymied the development of local industries.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Backgrounder: Relations between China, Cameroon People's Daily Online, March 23, 2010
  2. ^ "Chinese Foreign Minister Due In Cameroon Soon". CameroonOnline.org. 2015-01-05. Retrieved 2015-01-05. 
  3. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development.
  4. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. Project 350. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development.
  5. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. Project 289. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development.
  6. ^ Austin Strange, Bradley C. Parks, Michael J. Tierney, Andreas Fuchs, Axel Dreher, and Vijaya Ramachandran. 2013. China’s Development Finance to Africa: A Media-Based Approach to Data Collection. Project 22850. CGD Working Paper 323. Washington DC: Center for Global Development.
  7. ^ China Invades Country With Cheap, Fragile Goods AllAfrica.com via postnewsline.com, 28 August 2008